IN THIS ISSUE
WHEN TO PICK UP THE PACE
STRIDE FREQUENCY AND RUNNING EFFICIENCY
Routes and Photos
GENERAL INFORMATION
EATING BREAKFAST BEFORE EXERCISE
2018 TRAINING SCHEDULE
JOKE OF THE WEEK
KIRG TRAINING PLANS
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 8 Sept
LFS PATRIOT DAY 
Great Mills, MD

Sat 8 Sept
Stef Ripple 5k
Belvedere Md

Sat 15 Sept
PERSEVERANCE 5k
White Plains, Md

Sat 15 Sept
MY SOLE KNOWS 5k
District Heights, Md

Sun 16 Sept
MATT RECOVERY 5k
Havre de Grace, Md

Sun 16 Sept
TRI for the CHESAPEAKE
Mayo, Md

Sat 22 Sept
BOSS 5k
La Plata, Md

Sat 22 Sept
RUN for DAN
Waldorf, Md

Sat 22 Sept
JMJ 5k
Towson, Md

Sat 22 Sept
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5k
Crownsville, Md

Sat 29 Sept
GABRIEL NETWORK 5k
Columbia, Md

Sat 6 Oct
Howard County AUTISM 5k
Columbia, Md

Sun 7 Oct
KELLY T.S. 5k
Kent Island, Md

Sat 13 Oct
MYOSISTIS 5k
Centennial Park, Md

Sat 20 Oct
ST MARY RYKEN
Leonardtown, Md

Sat 20 Oct
OLD S.County C.C.Pink&Blue
South County C.C. , Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

WHEN TO PICK UP
THE PACE

RonandBeau
When I was running high school track (yes, they had tracks back then) our coach did not think it was a successful workout until you threw up.  Fortunately, we have made a lot of progress since then. Now, just because you finish your intervals without dry heaving doesn't mean you should jack up your pace right away. Speeding up too much too soon can be a recipe for disaster. Knowing when and how to pick up the pace will help you meet your goals come race day.

When you boost the intensity of your training, over time your muscles learn to endure more and difficult workouts feel easier. The body becomes more efficient at making energy and moving blood and oxygen to muscles where they're in demand. VO2 max improves and, voila, performance is elevated.

But how do you know when to speed up your intervals, repeats, or tempo runs? Here's a guide:

Give Yourself Time

Even if you're feeling great after workouts, allow three to four weeks before making substantial changes to the pace of your intervals. If you keep upping the tempo week after week without giving your body enough time to recover, you risk overtraining. Instead, enjoy the feeling of strength during these plateaus. If workouts continue to feel easy over a period of a month or more, it's probably a sign that it's time to speed up the intervals. Be sure not to speed them up by more than one to two seconds per lap at a time. That may not sound like much, but it adds up over the distance. If you speed up by too much, you could end up crashing on the last interval.

Listen to Your Body

There are certain signs that will help you understand that you're ready to take your intervals up a notch. One indication is when you feel, at the end of your workouts, like you could still easily do one more interval. If at the end of the workout, you feel like you can't run another step, you've probably gone too far. You should be breathing hard, not gasping for air. You want to build in a buffer so that you don't burn out.

Monitor Recovery

When you're running intervals, you typically "recover" for half to the same amount of time of the interval (so three to six minutes of recovery for a six-minute interval). If you are able to recover more quickly than that on the last intervals, it's time to pick up the pace. That means your cardiovascular system has adapted to the new intensity and is ready for additional work.

If you train with a heart-rate monitor, you can use a formula to gauge this. Your recovery heart rate is roughly halfway between your maximum and resting heart rates; if you reach it before your recovery period is over, you can speed up your intervals next time out. So, for example, if your maximum heart rate is 170 beats per minute and your resting heart rate is 60 beats per minute, step up the tempo if you reach 115 before your recovery period is over.

Mix It Up

And remember, pace is just one factor you can adjust to boost stamina; adding more repeats at the same pace or shortening recovery between intervals can also help. Don't adjust more than one factor at a time, though. Too much change all at once could be a one-way ticket to injury.


 You are an 'experiment of one' :-)

 
"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  
 
 Fatigue is voluntary.
 
  You are an 'experiment of one'
  
 
DIFFERENT RACES, DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT EVERYTHING.
 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far t
hey can go."   

STRIDE FREQUENCY
and
RUNNING EFFICIENCY
Most of us can't escape the ultra-shuffle as we reach the later stages of races. As we fatigue our biomechanics change in many ways, including changes in stride length and frequency. In this article I will shy away from the nitty gritty details of biomechanics and focus on the relationship between stride length and frequency and how they impact running economy.
At the same running speed, stride length and frequency are reciprocal with one increasing and the other decreasing. Running economy (or running efficiency) is defined as the oxygen consumption (or energy) required for a given running speed. Along with maximal oxygen consumption and speed at lactate threshold, running economy is very important for performance and can vary as much as 30% between runners with similar maximal oxygen consumptions. Previously, I have discussed how strength training and speed work enhance running economy, this article will focus on the role of stride length and frequency on running economy. Perhaps the ultra-shuffle is actually a mechanism to optimize efficiency, or maybe it's just a consequence of fatigue causing us to change our stride length and frequency for the worse?
both novice and experienced runners self-select a stride frequency below optimal, but experienced runners are significantly closer to optimal stride frequency.
A number of studies have looked at the relationship between self-selected (i.e., natural) stride frequency and an experimentally imposed stride frequency. Researchers examined stride frequency at three different speeds; self-selected, 90% and 110% of self-selected. At each speed heart rate was measured. The lowest heart rate was found at 83 strides/minute, whereas the self-selected stride frequency was close, but suboptimal at 78-80 strides/minute.
Researchers had novice and experienced runners run at a single speed, but using seven different stride frequencies all while measuring both heart rate and oxygen consumption to assess running economy. Novice runners' self-selected stride frequency was 77 strides/min, but optimal was 84 strides/min. Experienced runners self-selected at 85 strides/min, but their optimal stride frequency was 87 strides/min. Thus, both novice and experienced runners self-select a stride frequency below optimal, but experienced runners are significantly closer to optimal stride frequency.
Researchers also found that both heart rate and oxygen consumption can be used to measure running economy, which allows us to determine our own most economical stride frequency by measuring heart rate after running for 3-5 minutes at different stride frequencies. The data indicate that as we gain running experience we increase our self-selected stride frequency, but we are still likely running at a slightly lower stride frequency than is optimal.
The two above studies were done on runners who were not fatigued, but as we know the ultra-shuffle comes on after hours of running and fatigue has set in. Far less research has examined this question of whether self-selected stride frequency changes during fatigue and how that might impact running economy, but a couple of studies provide some insight.
First, runners who ran for an hour at near maximal intensity show a slight decrease in stride frequency from the beginning of the run to the end. But they managed to run at an optimal stride frequency for almost the entire time, suggesting that faster running results in self-selection of a more optimal stride frequency, further supporting the use of speed work in training, but not providing much insight into what happens during an ultra.
One research group focused a number of studies on how running economy and stride characteristics change in response to mountain ultras. Runners in the challenging Tour De Geant 330k race did not change stride frequency in post-race testing compared to pre-, but they did improve running economy on uphill (10 or 15% grade) treadmill tests, which suggests that such a long race may elicit other beneficial changes in running economy.
To summarize, in non-fatigued situations we tend to run at slightly too slow of a stride frequency, but we can improve our stride frequency with training. As we fatigue in an ultra we do increase stride frequency (on the flats) and adopt a stride to minimize damage, but whether these changes in stride characteristics also improve running economy have not been systematically tested and likely will vary depending on the type of terrain and speed of running.
Stay tuned as research in this area continues and for now keep shuffling on.
Matt Laye of Boise, Idaho, has a PhD in Medical Physiology and is an Assistant Professor of Health and Human Performance at The College of Idaho. He enjoys competing on trails and on the roads in distances from the mile to 100 miles. He has averaged under 8 min/mile for 100 miles and under 5:30/mile over a marathon.



ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

Spring/Summer Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
Week #316, 8 SEPT 2018
===========================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 A recent visit to the Naval Academy Columbarium to visit my running mentor - who taught me that

"RUNNING IS A METAPHOR FOR LIFE,
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE CHOICES YOU MAKE"

 LCOL BEN MOORE's resting spot.


GENERAL INFORMATION
NOTE:  We are down to 2 months coverage for the TRUMAN PORT A POT -
.---------------------------------------------------
This past weekend, we celebrated the 45th Reunion of my Naval Academy Class '73.  My
McCain burial site
 roommate and I took a running 'tour' of the Academy to show him the changes since he was last here.  During the run we stopped by the burial site for Senator/ '58 Grad John McCain. 



==============================
 NOTE: The traffic light on Truman Park is operational. 

RUTLAND RD - Maintenance is completed and is OPEN.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

BACON RIDGE NATURE TRAILS
 

We are hoping to have a new map for submission to MET and SRLT in the coming weeks.


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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE\

 - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE
Eating Breakfast 
Before Exercise May Burn More 
Carbs and 
Boost Metabolism
As the popular saying goes: "Breakfast is the
 most important meal of day." For some, a 
well-rounded breakfast has to be 
 their first meal of the day, while others feel 
that they function the best when they skip out 
on breakfast completely.
Whether or not you should eat breakfast before
 exercise in the morning has been a widely 
 discussed topic. Some say it's important, as it 
 muscles, whereas others believe in fasted 
workouts in order to burn more fat, if that's 
what you're after. According to a study 
published in the American Journal of 
Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism, 
eating breakfast before working out may "prime
" the body to burn more carbohydrates during
 exercise and accelerate metabolism after w
orking out.

Researchers at the University of Bath were
 studying the effect of eating breakfast vs. 
fasting overnight before cycling for one hour.
 In a controlled test, 12 men completed three
 trials: eating breakfast followed by three hours 
of rest, eating breakfast two hours before 
exercise, and overnight-fasted exercise.
After the exercise or rest, researchers tested 
the blood glucose levels and muscle glycogen 
levels of the volunteers. They found that eating breakfast increased the rate that the male volunteer's bodies were burning carbohydrates during exercise and also increased the rate that the body digested and metabolised food eaten 
after exercise.

"This is the first study to examine the ways in 
which breakfast before exercise influences our
 responses to meals after exercise. We found
 that, compared to skipping breakfast, eating 
breakfast before exercise increases the speed
 at which we digest, absorb and metabolize 
carbohydrates that we may eat after exercise,"
 Dr. Javier Gonzales, senior lecturer in the 
department for health and co-lead of the study, 
said, according to Science Daily. "We also found that breakfast before
 exercise increases carbohydrate burning during exercise, and that this carbohydrate wasn't just coming from the breakfast that was just eaten, but also from carbohydrate stored in our muscles as glycogen," said Rob Edinburgh, PhD student in the department for health and study co-lead.
Because of the increase in the use of muscle glycogen, this may be why there was a rapid clearance of blood sugar after lunch when breakfast was consumed before exercising, Rob explained. "This study suggests that, at least after a single bout of exercise, eating breakfast before exercise may 'prime' our body, ready for rapid storage of nutrition when we eat meals after exercise," the researchers concluded.

This study only assessed the short-term responses to breakfast after exercise and longer-term implications are unclear. Instead of drinking water first thing in the morning, with the hopes of boosting your metabolism, simply start eating breakfast before your morning workout!
 

2018 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

JOKE OF THE WEEK


HEY, WHO's BEEN
FOLLOWING ME? 
Kent Island Running Group is planning a new race! Mark your calendar for the inaugural Solstice Stomp 5K through Cascia Vineyards, planned for June 24 at 6:30pm. This unique evening race will wind through the lush vineyard, and the amazing after party features free wine tastings and live music in a picturesque waterfront setting. To register, go to https://www.kirg.org/solsticestomp/

 
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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003