IN THIS ISSUE
ROAD RUNNER VS TRAIL RUNNERS
HOW TO BECOME A BETTER CLIMBER
Routes and Photos
WHY DO I THINK BETTER AFTER A RUN
PERFORMANCE -= CONSISTENCY + GENETICA
ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 25 Jun
STOP the BLEEDING 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 July
CHESTER RIVER SWIM
Chestertown, Md

Sun 17 July
AA COUNTY STRIDERS
KID's TRI
Piney Orchard

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 30 July
ANCHOR RUN 5k
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

Sat 10 Sep
SPLASH DASH 5K
Crumpton, Md

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

 
ROAD RUNNERS vs TRAIL RUNNERS

RonandBeau
 
As a follow-on to last week's article on Road vs Trail Runner, Peter Tango sent in his Race Report on his first trail race.
 
"Fun piece on road vs trail Ron, I enjoyed it J. So true! As mostly a road racer, during my second foray into trail racing at the Big Elk Trail Half Marathon a week ago, I started out the race in typical road mode checking a couple of splits in the opening miles. I was running around 6th or 7th and averaging about 7:20/mile. That's slower than my typical  training pace on roads by a good margin, but there I was moving along well at the front of the race. By mile 6 of twists, turns, rises, falls, rockslides, switchbacks, creek crossings, stumps, roots, logs, rocks, mud, and fields, I checked my watch once more. I was feeling it head to toe from the ever changing landscape under my feet including a few
 moments of twisted ankles, and I saw that I was now even slower and averaging just over 8 minutes a mile, and still through it all I had moved up into 3rd. I never bothered to look at my watch again, it served no purpose beyond telling time. The landscape was dictating everything. The backside of the course was just a little bit kinder with a couple of short stretches where I could stretch my legs, open up my stride, shake out my legs, but then minutes later it would be back to single track switchbacks and more. I had to push through the last mile before exiting the woods, holding down 3rd,  and cruising into the finish line at 1:38:28. No headlamps needed on this one but unlike the road version of me, I did learn to carry a water bottle. Oh yeh, the after party was like a family bbq with hamburgers, hot dogs, veggie burgers, watermelon, chips and such. Bagels and bananas are always very much appreciated but the post-race meal here was a nice end-of-trail race surprise. A very fun day.
 
HOW TO LEARN TO A 
 
 
BETTER 
-CLIMBER-

Eric Senseman wrote for the Denver Post recently.

"Standing atop a 14,000-foot peak this summer, having nimbly navigated high alpine terrain in thin air, you'll thank yourself for all the uphill battles with pavement, trail, and stairwell that you endured to get there. Mountain summits don't come easy, but you can prepare yourself by improving your fitness and strength before your feet ever hit the path. 
Ewen North, head coach at Revolution Running, a multisport training club for all levels of runners along Colorado's Front Range, encourages hikers and runners to incorporate exercises with an incline as much as they can.
"Quite simply, running or walking uphill, whether you're a beginner, seasoned veteran, or top level professional, is one of the most beneficial activities you will ever do to help improve your fitness," North says. "It's important that hikers wanting to summit 14ers do some preparation work as not only will it make the attempt more achievable, it will reduce the risk of injury."
Prepare for an injury-free, summit-filled summer by incorporating the following workouts into your routine. You should aim to complete two to three workouts per week, and begin about five or more weeks before your next big uphill adventure.  
Stair Repeats
Stair repeats, or running up stairs over and over again, may not sound fun, but they can improve your power and strength in quick, explosive bursts. This workout is especially useful for city dwellers who can't regularly get to the mountains or foothills. Find a stairwell of at least five stories, and spend five to 10 minutes walking or lightly jogging before and after.
  • For the out-of-shape individual: Walk powerfully up at least five flights of stairs, then return to the lowest floor via the elevator. Repeat six to eight times. Progress to more flights of stairs if possible, or increase the repeats to as many as 10.  
  • For the average Jane or Joe: Do the same as above but incorporate running as your fitness progresses. Start by running every third or fourth repeat but try to run as many as every other repeat as you progress.  
  • For the exceptional athlete: Run five or more flights of stairs eight times, taking the elevator back to the bottom floor after each repetition. Increase the pace as you progress, or do as many as 12 repeats.
Swing your arms and drive your knees on steep inclines.
 
Short Hill Repeats
Repeatedly walking or running up an incline for a short period of time, and at a high effort, will teach you to navigate climbs smoothly and efficiently. "Going uphill makes the body operate at a harder level because you're going against gravity," North explains. "Doing this regularly allows the body to respond to the stimulus being applied. Over time, fitness is developed." To perform this workout, find a 400-meter uphill section of trail or road. Begin and end the workout with 10 to 15 minutes of walking or easy running.
  • For the athlete: Run uphill for 90 seconds, then walk or jog back to your starting point. Repeat 10 times. Extend the uphill interval up to three minutes. Think about pumping your arms and driving your knees forward for maximum benefit.
Power hike steep sections by using your hands to push off your knees. 

The Long Uphill
Long, continuous uphill efforts teach you to get into a rhythm and improve your uphill capacity. "Regularly incorporating lengthy hill walks or runs will get the muscles and connective tissue used to the action of going uphill. The increased cardiovascular fitness will also help enormously as the air gets thinner," North says. Find an uphill trail or paved road that continues upward for at least three miles at a moderate grade. When preparing for a 14er, execute your long uphill workout by summiting a smaller, more accessible mountain in the foothills, like Green Mountain in Boulder or the White Ranch Open Space Park's high points in Golden. Warm up before, and cool down after, your long uphill effort, with 15-20 minutes of easy jogging or walking.
  • For the athlete: Begin with 60 minutes of continuous uphill exercise and alternate between walking and running. Use your breathing as a guide: Walk if you're gasping for breath, run when your breathing is under control. Progress to 90 minutes and incorporate as much running as possible.
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

PORT  A   POT  Donation
We need your donation.

 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

I can now accept credit card donations; with secure, receipt verification.

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #231, 25 JUNE 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 


"Balance, that's the secret. Moderate extremism. The best of both worlds."

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 6 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE:  The 2016 MARATHON, HALF MARATHON, and ULTRA Training Plans are posted - ta da.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

A SPECIAL THANKS to Leslie Kriewald for her donation to our Port A Pot!!!
----------------------------------------------------------------
 
Last Saturday's run was very nice.  Of course, we only did the Chesterfield loop as a 'test' of my recovering hip.  We did have a good sized group; with a variety of distances and paces. Temps started in the low 70's with comparatively lower humidity but raised quickly to the 80's.
  
Running in brutal summer temperatures means you need to focus on electrolyte replacement. I know there are several of you who have indicated you are finding it hard to drink a sports drink during your runs. It is dangerous to strictly drink water during these long training days and on the day of your event. You really need to include some form of sports drink. Those of you that are heavy sweaters may find it easier to add supplements.  You can simply carry a few packets from a fast food restaurant in a plastic bag, or try the supplements that not only have sodium, but magnesium and potassium (we lose all that and more when we sweat) listed below. Many of these are available at our local run and bike shops
 
Succeed Tablets   Endurolytes    NUUN Tablets    NATHAN SPORT 
 
Now is the time to experiment with these supplements, and sports drink options so you can find something that will work for you during your event.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

Why Do I Think Better after I Exercise?

 
After being cooped up inside all day, your afternoon stroll may leave you feeling clearheaded. This sensation is not just in your mind. A growing body of evidence suggests we think and learn better when we walk or do another form of exercise. The reason for this phenomenon, however, is not completely understood.
Part of the reason exercise enhances cognition has to do with blood flow. Research shows that when we exercise, blood pressure and blood flow increase everywhere in the body, including the brain. More blood means more energy and oxygen, which makes our brain perform better.
Another explanation for why working up a sweat enhances our mental capacity is that the hippocampus, a part of the brain critical for learning and memory, is highly active during exercise. When the neurons in this structure rev up, research shows that our cognitive function improves. For instance, studies in mice have revealed that running enhances spatial learning. Other recent work indicates that aerobic exercise can actually reverse hippocampal shrinkage, which occurs naturally with age, and consequently boost memory in older adults. Yet another study found that students who exercise perform better on tests than their less athletic peers.
The big question of why we evolved to get a mental boost from a trip to the gym, however, remains unanswered. When our ancestors worked up a sweat, they were probably fleeing a predator or chasing their next meal. During such emergencies, extra blood flow to the brain could have helped them react quickly and cleverly to an impending threat or kill prey that was critical to their survival.
So if you are having a mental block, go for a jog or hike. The exercise might help pull you out of your funk.
LEARNING TO RUN
DOWNHILL EFFICIENTLY
If you've ever woken up with burning quads the day after a hilly race, you can probably blame all the downhill pounding. Although running uphill may feel more difficult from a cardio perspective, going downhill well is challenging-and a lot harder on your body.

Here's why: Muscles contract in two ways-concentrically (muscle shortens: think picking something up) and eccentrically (muscle lengthens while contracting: think putting that something back down). "Eccentric contractions are much more costly from an energy and wear and tear perspective," says Dr. Ivo Waerlop, D.C. "Running downhill requires lots of eccentric contraction, especially in the quadriceps and lower leg muscles." Mastering the downhill with proper form will put less stress on your legs and can help you make up time in your next race.
Form tips for going fast downhill
Lean forward from the hips, not the shoulders. Gravity naturally pulls you downhill. Avoid the urge to lean back and focus on keeping your body perpendicular to the ground. "As you increase speed, move your center of gravity forward with you; not enough and your feet are sliding out from under you, too much and you're on your face," Waerlop says.

Use your arms for balance. When running downhill, we don't need the forward-back arm movement for power like we do on flats and uphills. Although it may look ridiculous in race photos, Xterra world champion Lesley Paterson recommends flailing your arms out to the side for balance. "It can help give your body the control it might need if speed takes over or a sudden change in direction is needed," she says.
Engage your core. Think of your abs, glutes and back as your stable base that your limbs work around.
"Circle" your stride. Because you don't need as much power from the knee drive (thanks, gravity!), keep the feet under the body and don't overstride. "I often do an almost circular motion-especially if on steep terrain-rather than driving the knee straight through in front of the body," Paterson says. "It allows more extension out the back and a chance to relax some of the muscles in the follow-through."
Look down the hill, not at your feet. Waerlop says when you look at your shoes, it induces neck forward flexion and actually facilitates your flexor muscles, which "turns off" the hip extensor muscles (glutes, hamstrings, back muscles)-the ones which help keep you upright and neutral- increasing your risk of falling forward.
Imagine hot coals under your feet. Keep contact time as minimal as possible. "I like to feel as though I am 'dancing' over the ground, just lightly touching it with my mid-/forefoot and springing right off again," Paterson says. This is even more important for off-road running, when you need to be more versatile with where you plant your foot and for how long.

Perfect Foot Position
Think of your foot as a tripod, with the three points being the heads of the big and little toes (at the ball line) and the heel. This tripod needs to be level for the foot to function optimally. If you are too much on your heel, your shins need to slow the descent of the foot, which can lead to shin splints. If you land too much on your forefoot, your calves have to work harder to lower your heel and will exaggerate any forefoot abnormality you have in your gait; this will place additional stress on your knees


 

ROSARYVILLE  TRAILS RUNS
Rosaryville logo
Come join us for a 'day in the woods with friends'.  Your choice of 10K, 10M, 25K,or 50K at the Rosaryville State Park
Sunday 24 July
OR

To benefit
 SPECIAL OPERATIONS WARFARE FOUNDATION

 
Registration is NOW open for the  10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
 

 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd









 

CLICK HERE to register

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003