IN THIS ISSUE
ROAD RUNNER VS TRAIL RUNNERS
EVEN SHORTER HIGH INTENSE TRAINING IS BETTER
ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS
Routes and Photos
2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE
TRUXTON KIDS TRI VOLUNTEERS
THE HEART OF FINISHING DFL
PERFORMANCE -= CONSISTENCY + GENETICA
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
UP COMING EVENTS

Sun 19 Jun
SPCA 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 19 Jun
TRUXTON TRI
Truxton Park

Sat 25 Jun
STOP the BLEEDING 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 July
CHESTER RIVER SWIM
Chestertown, Md

Sun 17 July
AA COUNTY STRIDERS
KID's TRI
Piney Orchard

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 30 July
ANCHOR RUN 5k
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

Sat 10 Sep
SPLASH DASH 5K
Crumpton, Md

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

 
ROAD RUNNERS vs TRAIL RUNNERS

RonandBeau
 
It's not unusual to see cross over between trail runners and road runners, a more and more road runners are looking for new adventures on the trails. 
 
And while road running and trail running are not mutually exclusive, they are different sports with different cultures. It reminds me of the stand-up comedy piece by comedian George Carlin on the differences between baseball and football.
 
In that piece, Carlin says, "In football, you wear a helmet; in baseball, you wear a cap. In football, you march into enemy territory; in baseball, you come home. In football, you play in any kind of weather, rain, snow, sleet, hail and fog. In baseball you get rained out. In football, they tackle you in the mud; in baseball, if you slide into second base, you call time out to dust off your uniform. ..." And the list goes on.
 
So, I created the same sort of piece for trail runners vs. road runners? Here it is:
 
* Road runners show up in snazzy matching outfits and Nike track suits. Trail runners have been mistaken for homeless people.
 
* Road runners try to step around the puddles on the street; trail runners are warned not to rock hop when going through rivers and streams so they don't break an ankle
 
* Road races have aid stations every two miles where the volunteers throw Gatorade into your mouth as you run by. Trail runners have a delectable feast at their aid stations with cookies, chips, PB&Js, trail mix and gummy bears.

* Road runners are constantly checking their watches for split times; trail runners check where the sun is in the sky, to see if they need to take out their headlamps.

* Road runners have pretty white tennies; trail runners have so much dirt and mud all over their shoes, you can't tell what color they are.

* Serious road runners don't carry water. Trail runners have backpacks with water bladders, rain jackets, blister care, food and electrolyte tablets.
 
* If you go down in a road race, the road runners will jump over you and let volunteers know at the next aid station; trail runners will stop, pull out their meds, first aid-kit, emergency beacon, give you CPR and carry you to the next aid station.

* Road runners hope they are not overtaken by faster runners; trail runners watch out for mountain lions, rattle snakes, bears or other creatures.

* Road runners check for flat fast courses; trail runners look at elevation charts and the scenery.
* Road runners are lean and skinny; trail runners can crush a road runner with their calves and power up mountains with their glutes.
* Road marathons might have up to 40,000 runners, start with fireworks and end with bands and balloons; trail races start with, "Ready, Set . . . GO!"

* Road races are meticulously measured and certified; trail runs might be a few miles long, give or take a mile or two.

* Road runners count miles and study average pace; trail runners train by time.

* Both road and trail runners are healthier than the average American couch potato, and enjoy the camaraderie of their fellow runners.

* And finally, both trail runners and road runners like wearing their race T-shirts and gaining bragging rights.
   :-)
 

EVEN SHORTER BOUTS OF HIGH INTENSITY TRAINING CAN BE MOST BENEFICIAL
It is a commonly held perception that getting in shape and staying there requires hard work and hours upon hours of training. Now, new research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) shows the opposite -- just four minutes of vigorous activity three times per week is enough to make previously inactive men fitter and more healthy.
Regular training improves maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), which is a well-established measure of physical fitness. However, just how much exercise, and how intense that exercise should be to deliver the biggest benefit remains to be defined. Now, researchers from NTNU's KG Jebsen Centre of Exercise in Medicine/Cardiac Exercise Research Group have found that just three short high-intensity sessions (AIT) per week can make for substantial differences in the fitness of inactive men.
"Our data suggest that a single bout of AIT performed three times per week may be a time-efficient strategy to improve VO2max," says Arnt Erik Tjønna, a postdoctoral fellow at the centre and lead author of the study. Tjønna says one of the advantages of this approach is that it is easy for people to incorporate into their daily lives.
The researchers measured changes in VO2max and traditional cardiovascular risk factors in 24 inactive but otherwise healthy overweight men after they completed a 10-week training session that involved three weekly high-intensity interval sessions. One group of 13 followed a protocol that has previously shown to be effective, consisting of four intervals of 4 minutes of high intensity exercise at 90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax) interspersed with 3 minutes of active recovery at 70% HRmax (4-AIT), commonly known as 4x4 training.
The other group followed a protocol that consisted of one 4-minute interval at 90% HRmax (1-AIT). After training, VO2max increased by 10% in the group that had just one high-intensity session three times a week (1-AIT), while the group that followed the 4x4 regime increased its VO2max by 13%. Both groups saw decreases in their blood pressure, but the 1-AIT the group's blood pressures showed greater decreases than their 4-AIT counterparts for both systolic and diastolic readings.
Tjønna says while the results look promising, the number of study participants was small, which limits the scientists' ability to extrapolate their findings. He also noted that people who are active probably won't benefit as much as the inactive participants did from the 1-AIT training regime.
"It has to be noted that the subjects were previously inactive, and the same effect on physical fitness cannot be expected in active individuals," he said. "Nevertheless, since we know that more and more people are inactive and overweight, the kind of improvement in physical fitness that we saw in this study may provide a real boost for inactive people who are struggling to find the motivation to exercise."

 

ROSARYVILLE  TRAILS RUNS
Rosaryville logo
Come join us for a 'day in the woods with friends'.  Your choice of 10K, 10M, 25K,or 50K at the Rosaryville State Park
Sunday 24 July
OR

To benefit
 SPECIAL OPERATIONS WARFARE FOUNDATION

 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #230, 18 JUNE 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 
"I want to get more comfortable being uncomfortable. I want to get more confident being uncertain. I don't want to shrink back just because something isn't easy. I want to push back, and make more room in the area between I can't and I can. Maybe that spot is called -I will. "

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 6 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).
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NOTE:  The 2016 MARATHON, HALF MARATHON, and ULTRA Training Plans are posted - ta da.
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A SPECIAL THANKS to Leslie Kriewald for her donation to our Port A Pot!!!
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The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 
FEATURED ARTICLE

Truxtun Youth Triathlon on Sunday June 19th is looking for volunteers on the Run or Bike course. If you have family, friends or other groups that would be interested, please volunteer at the link below.  Race tee shirts will be provided for each volunteer.

 

THE HEART OF FINISHING
DFL

 
Little voices can pop up in the back of our head before the start of a race. They ask questions like, "Am I ready? Do I have what it takes?" And sometimes pipe in with, "What if I come in last?" Many might fear the thought of finishing last - vivid nightmares of a finish line being taken down upon those final steps can be daunting. And unfortunately, where there's a winner, there will also be someone who finishes Dead F*cking Last.  But is that such a bad thing?

Ultra marathons slow down even the fastest of runners, and that means everyone else's pace slips a little or a lot, depending on the circumstances.  Time cut-offs at aid stations were implemented to prevent volunteers and race officials from being out there longer than they had planned, otherwise the slower, determined ultrarunners might just keep going well into Monday.  Because no one wants to be pulled from a race.  No one.

Ours is a sport about getting to the finish line. If there's any concern about being last, it's likely to dissolve within the first 25 miles (unless the aid stations start running out of food). The embarrassment that could fester in the head of a back-of-the-packer during the final stretch of a road race isn't common for ultrarunners, because spending hours on the trail strips us down to our true selves, leaving worries like those in the dust.
We intend to finish what we start - pushing ourselves to the outermost limits.  And sometimes, we unexpectedly prove to the world that it can be done. 

 At age 70, Gunhild Swanson created one of the most intense DFL finishes at last year's Western States.  As she rounded the track at Auburn, the time clock ticked down to less than a minute away from the 30-hour cutoff.  The entire crowd cheered her on, running along side her and swarming behind as she simultaneously neared the finish and the cutoff.  With six seconds to spare, she crossed the finish line and became one of the top stories from Western States that year, right alongside winner Rob Krar, and his repeat victory.

When the last finisher of a race inspires just as much as the winner, that's when you know it isn't about what place you came in, it's about being able to say you did it.  A personal journey that started with a few hundred people, and ended with you.

Performance = Consistency + Genetics.
Coach Paul Roche gives all of the athletes he coaches that simplified formula. Solving it takes effort, but if you put in the time, it provides insight for structuring your running training, removing self-imposed pressure and enjoying every run.
So how can you maximize each variable?
 
1. Consistency
Good running training is like the classic '90s movie She's All That, in which a normal student becomes the most beautiful person in the class on the day of the big dance.
Most of the time, good training is unglamorous. It's all about getting the job done during the daily grind. The bulk of running progression comes from logging many miles over many years, some hard but most easy, focusing on avoiding major setbacks and day-to-day excuses. "Sexy" run training, replete with complexity and epicness, often ends in injury. Instead, structure your life and training in a way that prioritizes day-after-day, month-after-month and year-after-year work.
Then, on race day, you can transform into a beautiful, fleet-footed queen or king of the big dance.
 
Consistency Tips
1. Even one mile counts. If you are tired from work (or from binge-watching '90s movies on Netflix) and can't do your planned run, at least do something. I only get disappointed with my athletes if they fail to run at all when they are healthy.
2. Start slow. Take the pressure off by doing the first 5 to 10 minutes of each run extra relaxed, like you are a girl walking down the stairs on prom night in a Freddy Prinze Jr. movie.
3. Work up to at least five or six runs a week. Once your body adapts to running, it craves it. If I take even two days off, my calf muscles ache for days after I start up again.
4. Choose hard workouts that align with your goals. Two principles to remember: You need consistent mileage to support hard workouts, and any workout that substantially increases injury risk is a bad workout. So unless you are doing more than five or six hours of running per week, focus on building consistency before you build intensity beyond one focused yet safe workout (like strides or hill intervals) per week. (Runners older than 50 may want to substitute some of the running volume with cross training to avoid injury.)
5. Think long term. Running rewards personalities that can deal with delayed gratification. If you have an injury, rest it. If you are thinking of running a 50-mile race but are only training 35 miles per week, wait a year or two, until you have built up to running more miles. Approach both big and small decisions by thinking about whether they will make you a better runner a year from now.
  
2. Genetics
Here's a fun experiment: Ask the best runner you know how they did in the elementary-school gym-class mile. Chances are good that they finished in the top few, even if they had never run before that moment.
Too often, runners don't acknowledge the prominent role genetics play in training and racing. VO2 max has a strong genetic component, and lactate threshold only slightly less. Even the way your bones are shaped matters.
Fortunately, you can train your physiology to improve massive amounts, but that improvement requires years of consistent commitment to daily running.
Interestingly, the emerging study of epigenetics may reveal that the way our genetics works is not as fixed as you might think. Epigenetics is the study of gene activation. To simplify it a bit, the genes themselves are fixed, but external factors-environment, behavior-can change the way they express. In other words, if you do some activity, like running, consistently over time, your gene expression may change to make you better at that activity-and some alterations may even be passed on to offspring. So while you have no control over your genetic code, you may have some control over how that genetic code impacts your running.
 
Genetics Tips:
1. Don't sweat it. No matter how hard you work, you can't choose your parents. So don't think about your running-related genetic luck too much. Most of us never get anywhere close to our genetic potential anyway, unless we're training at an elite level for many years. In practice, unless you are going to use the data to structure your training, I recommend not trying to measure your genetic potential through something like a VO2 max test; it will only lead to needless self-judgment.

2. Think long term. This tip rears its boring head again! You will only find out your true genetic potential with years of dedication to any activity, whether it is running or lawyering or knitting. Don't get discouraged and never give up on your goals along the way.
 

It takes time to determine whether a puppy has the genetic potential to be a champion sled dog.
 
3. Performance
Most importantly for people thinking about doing a trail race, performance is mostly out of your control once you get to race day. Almost everyone thinks they could have gone harder or found some magic if only they had pushed a bit more, but in my experience, that is not the way it works. You do what you can-some days you have it, some days you don't. Consistent, smart training is designed to put more days in the first category.
 
Performance Tips
1. Don't get nervous or beat yourself up. Just do what you can based on a smart plan and view race day as a party no matter what. By the time you get to the start line, the work is done, and the race itself is just a celebration of the grind it took to get there.
2. Smile every mile. Drink a beer after the race. Then go back to thinking about how you can be as consistent as possible in the next block of the training grind.
 

Registration is NOW open for the  10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
 

 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd









 

CLICK HERE to register

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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

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