IN THIS ISSUE
MORE ABOUT EXTREME ENDURANCE EXERCISE POTENTIALLY DAMAGING THE HEART
TRAINING OVERREACH - YOU?
ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS
Routes and Photos
TRUXTON KIDS TRI VOLUNTEERS
kNOW YOUR SWEAT RATE
WHY YOUR BALANCE IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE
2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
UP COMING EVENTS

Sun 19 Jun
SPCA 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 19 Jun
TRUXTON TRI
Truxton Park

Sat 25 Jun
STOP the BLEEDING 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 July
CHESTER RIVER SWIM
Chestertown, Md

Sun 17 July
AA COUNTY STRIDERS
KID's TRI
Piney Orchard

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 30 July
ANCHOR RUN 5k
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

Sat 10 Sep
SPLASH DASH 5K
Crumpton, Md

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

 
MORE about "Runners may live longer, but extreme endurance exercise may damage heart"

RonandBeau
  
Barb Hamilton sent this article a while back about the affects of long distance running (riding, rowing, etc) producing disruptive chemicals and scarring.

  
I strongly recommend you read them and draw your own conclusions.  After all, an informed runner is a better person :-)
For me, it is a matter of how you (each of us) defines "moderate exercise".  To some, that's around the block three times a week, others it's 20 miles a day.  It's ALL relative :-)
  I think it somewhat a generalization.  They did not give statistics on how many in the study developed/already had the contrary indications - so, it's like mountain lion attacks.  If an attack happens to 1 in 100 cases for runners along a certain trail - do you take the odds and go for a run?  You weigh the odds and the benefits and MAKE A CHOICE.
  For me,  I KNOW I would  be less content NOT doing what I enjoyed - not to mention probably being divorced - on the chance I might be developing one/some of the indications in the article.   If I find at some point that I have developed any of the indications mentioned in the articles,  I know I have had a LOT of years of enjoyment and fulfillment - AND it was MY choice  :-)
 

Training Overreach: The Warning Signs You Should Never Ignore
Overtraining is a full-grown grizzly bear, throwing massive, mauling haymakers that can ruin your day-to-day life.
Overreaching, meanwhile, is a bear cub. It's mostly harmless on its own, but momma grizzly could be close behind unless you act quickly.
Trail-running training is a constant process of introducing stress that causes your body to adapt positively. Sometimes, the body doesn't heal as quickly as it should. That "overreach" can be caused by high-intensity training, a big increase in training volume or even the way running interacts with your life outside of short shorts (things like lack of sleep, too much work or inadequate nutrition).

No matter what causes an overreach, you need to recognize it immediately and know how to react. Continuing normal hard workouts through overreaching symptoms causes the workouts to suffer, and things could progress into overtraining syndrome, a disastrous array of maladies that sometimes ends running careers.
The science on the overtraining spectrum is incomplete, so it's essential to listen to your body. Here's how.
 
Symptoms
There is no clinical diagnosis I have as a coach that makes me go, "Ohshnikes, time to back off." But there are some symptoms you should never ignore.

1. "Clenching" Quads in the Evening
There is a difference between soreness (which is usually fine) and deep fatigue (which could put you in deep shnike).
If you are lying in bed and your legs are uncomfortable on a cellular level- difficult-to-pinpoint fatigue that feels deeper than run-of-the-mill soreness-your body may be having an adverse reaction to training stress.
On a related note, if you find yourself involuntarily flexing your legs throughout the evening, it's time to back off.

2. Difficulty Sleeping or Difficulty Staying Awake
Hard training produces the stress hormone cortisol. Too much cortisol can throw your sleep rhythms off. For some athletes, dangerous overtraining manifests itself as an inability to sleep deeply at all.
The key is avoiding that point at all costs, since it starts a self-perpetuating cycle that has left many runners up shnike creek without a paddle.

3. Abnormal Fatigue Walking Up Stairs or Running Up Slight Hills
If a broken escalator is a great personal setback, your training is taking too much out of you. Deep fatigue seems to be impossible to ignore on inclines.

4. Abnormal Heart-Rate Readings
If you monitor your heart rate, always be on the lookout for big deviations. An overreach can manifest in just about any abnormality you can think of. Pay special attention to an elevated resting heart rate and a too-high or too-low heart rate during activity.
A less scientific but equally tell-tale signal is your heartbeat at night-watch for a strange awareness of your heart beating through your temples. It didn't end well for Edgar Allen Poe's protagonist, and it probably won't end well for you either if you ignore it.

5. Abnormal Fatigue or Lack of Motivation
If you are a highly motivated person, respect any dips you perceive in your focus-they are usually singing a song that your physiology is writing. (If you are lazy, then suck it up unless you have one of the other indicators above.)

Gentle inclines are a good time to look out for symptoms of overreaching. Photo by David Roche
 
Treatment (Running)
In a hard three-month training block, I might feel the above symptoms once or twice; overreaching slightly is a natural byproduct of quality training.
What sets people apart is not so much avoiding it altogether, but responding swiftly using whichever of the below methods works best for you.

1. Slow Jogging
The week before the 2016 Way Too Cool 50K, I was running with trail-running stud Dylan Bowman and my wife Megan, also a top runner, when I had extreme difficulty keeping up. The next morning, Megan and I drove to our favorite trails, and I could barely move.
I had symptoms (1), (3) and (5) above-painful legs at rest that only got worse on a slight incline, accompanied by an urge to say "fudge this shnike." So I jogged at 10-minute pace with our dog until I felt better, just in time for the biggest race of my season.
The father of running training, Arthur Lydiard, used to have his athletes run painfully slow when they demonstrated similar symptoms. His direction was something along the lines of running at the pace of an elderly person pushing a shopping cart. In other words, slow down until you don't feel resistance from your body, and run at that pace (up to 90 minutes each day if you're an advanced athlete).

2. Complete Rest
Even slow running can be a stress, so if you feel especially bad, don't even do that. Let your legs completely recover, doing some push-ups or other upper-body lifting if you need to burn off steam and get your hormones pumping. Using the sauna is a good way to sweat without much stress.

3. Easy Running Plus Fast Strides
Sometimes, an overreach isn't too worrisome, and is accompanied by just minor symptoms. In that case, you can run low effort and add in some fast strides at the end. Strides are smooth 20-to-30-second accelerations that max out at 800-meter race pace. You can do them on hills to work on power, even when you feel a bit weak.
However, no matter what, don't push yourself in moderate or hard workouts if you're experiencing the symptoms above.
 
Treatment (Lifestyle)
Lifestyle is highly individual. These tips are merely guidelines that address possible precipitating factors of overreach.

1. Diet
Often, an overreach can be caused by inadequate nutrition and hydration. If an athlete eats meat, I usually recommend a burger or a steak each day until the symptoms go away. If an athlete doesn't eat meat, I just advise them to eat a lot of something rich in fat and protein.
Never skimp through an overreach, even if activity levels decrease. Some people theorize that overtraining is usually accompanied by lack of calories (especially fat). While the science is still out on many of the overtraining theories, there is a general consensus that inadequate fuel can make the engine go bad.
Another thing to monitor is your iron. Almost all the high-volume runners I know (especially women) take supplementary iron or vitamins that contain iron. Be extremely careful with any supplement, and always consult a doctor before use.

2. Sleep
You heal when you are asleep. At its core, overreaching is insufficient healing. So make time for shut-eye! (Here's more on why sleep is essential to runners.)

3. Stress
The body doesn't differentiate too much between sources of stress-the cortisol can come from hard running, hard parenting or hard dancing. Account for all sources of stress, and aim to limit them whenever you can. Also, make time to put your legs up for 10 minutes a day, meditating while your legs levitate. Use compression gear on your legs if you are going to be stationary for a long time while working.
Most of all, chill. Life is not a race, and even if it is, very few people are eager to reach the inevitable finish line. So slow down and take your time, whether it's with training or other life goals. The joy is in the journey. By making smart decisions, you can get the most out of your body-and avoid getting eaten by a self-created grizzly bear.
 

ROSARYVILLE  TRAILS RUNS
Rosaryville logo
Come join us for a 'day in the woods with friends'.  Your choice of 10K, 10M, 25K,or 50K at the Rosaryville State Park
Sunday 24 July
OR

To benefit
 SPECIAL OPERATIONS WARFARE FOUNDATION

 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

PORT  A   POT  Donation
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 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

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OUR SPONSORS
 
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SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #229, 11 JUNE 2016
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25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 
"The fearless are merely fearless. People who act in spite of their fear are truly brave." - working for your first marathon is brave.
  - James A. LaFond-Lewis, 

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 6 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).
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NOTE:  The 2016 MARATHON, HALF MARATHON, and ULTRA Training Plans are posted - ta da.
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A SPECIAL THANKS to Leslie Kriewald for her donation to our Port A Pot!!!
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This is not really a Race Report, more of a Crew Report.  I agreed to Crew for Jim LeClare for his OLD DOMINION 100 run this past weekend. John Gee and Justin Peake were also planning to toe-the-line so when the gun went off at 4am Saturday morning, Kelly Gee, John Curley, Tom and Nancy Zorn, and I were 'at the ready'.
  One of the most difficult things about Crewing - as well as being the Crew-ee (Crew-ed?) is logistics. Jim, John, and Justin had a very precise game plan with expected arrival times for each of the Crew accessible Aid Stations (many others were in out of the way places only foxes and rabbits dared to go).  
  I met Jim at 20 miles after he did a huge 3 mile switchback climb that we scoped out the day before - Ugh! He was 15 minutes ahead of his Pla n and cruising.  My next stop was Four Pts at 35 miles.  It was a 15 mile loop back to the same spot so I decided to start running a hour before we expected Jim to arrive - figuring he would catch up with me.  Justin and John were about 30 minutes back and separated by about 10 min.
 Man, that was a TOUGH 14 miles even with about 6 of it on road. The rest was very narrow single track, mostly very rocky, and along/in stream beds.  I finished before Jim and he was beginning to suffer. He came in about 6:30 (the leader came in at 4:30-amazing) The heat was getting to Jim.
   John Curley, Tom and Nancy Zorn met me at the 56 mile Station. Kelly Gee and Emily Peake came in a bit later. The boys were beginning to suffer - a LOT.
   It was pretty cool for me as the Aid Station Captain recognized me from "way back" so we extolled everyone on 'how it used to be".  Jim came in and immediately puked; set down and tried to recovery, get something to stay in his stomach. He got himself together and got back on the trail after about 40 minutes in the Aid Station.  Justin came in tired but looking good; John came in next looking good but showing signs of fading.
  From there we Crew went to Woodstock for lunch and then John Curley and I headed to Elizabeth Furnace Station (75 miles)- the only section runners could have Pacers was 75 to 86 miles.  Tom went to Small Fort (65 miles) to support John or whomever was struggling the most.
   It turns out Jim got 'swepted' and pulled out at 65 miles - so he got a 100K in.  There was a 12 am Cut Off at EF so we were relieved and concerned when Justin came in at 11pm, well after expected time.  John Curley and I took off (read- stumbled in the dark) with Justin, figuring Tom could get John to a quicker pace he would need to make the cut off.
  Well folks, the next 4+ hours could be a story all in itself. After a mile of rocky single track along the river, we up - long switchbacks, straight vertical sections, but always over continuous loose rocks. Oh, and did I mention the rain - expected thunderstorms and flooding.  It has been a LONG time since I felt so invigorated!  I loved EVERY minute!  I realized I had pulled ahead of Justin and John when I did not see the 1000 watt searchlight headlamp John was wearing.  I had been chatting with no one for a good part of the climb - never wondering why I did not get any replies.
  We reached the top, breathed a bit, then started down.  Down was easier, but only slightly.  At night, with your entire focus on the 4 ft diameter illuminated by your headlamp (in my case, an old Army surplus headlamp - John's and Justin's lamps covered about a square acre).  I'm sure part of the reason I was "enjoying" the night stroll was that I had 'only' done 15 miles early - not 75 miles - AND I did not have anther 15 miles to go!!  Just to keep things in perspective :-)
  To top off the adventure, our logistics got screwed up and we missed our ride from Veach West (86 miles) back to Elizabeth Furnace, where the car was.  So John and I walked 5 miles back up the main road - pitch black, walking on the yellow center line.  We passed cows we could only see their eyes - about a foot apart, heard all the night sounds (although it is very still at 2am).  At one point, we startled four dogs in a fenced yard who commenced to bark at us until we passed. One got out and made a false charge, but we both turned and must have looked too intimidating - or we had just left his territory and were no longer worth the effort.
   When we left Justin for his last 14 mile leg, he was moving well, and in good spirits - but we figured he had to do 4 mph (15 min/mile) the rest of the way. Which was mostly down but with a few climbs.  It was going to be CLOSE.
   He made it at 27:50, 10 minutes
 to spare!!  I was/am truly impressed.  He literally had to ramp up his effort over those last 14 miles - and that is impressive with 86 miles already under your belt.
   It was a nice adventure for me.  I got in 32 miles overall.  You all should try it sometime!
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The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 
FEATURED ARTICLE

Truxtun Youth Triathlon on Sunday June 19th is looking for volunteers on the Run or Bike course. If you have family, friends or other groups that would be interested, please volunteer at the link below.  Race tee shirts will be provided for each volunteer.

 

KNOWING YOUR "SWEAT RATE" AND WHY IT'S IMPORTANT

 
-As I was working my way through the 93 degree temps during the run portion of the EAGLEMAN HALF IRONMAN TRI near Cambridge this Sunday, I realized it was time to remind you all about your Sweat Rate.  After the Eeewwwss and Yeccccks; it makes very good sense.   Everyone sweats at a different rate; some soak their shoes and socks and others 'glow', so when you ask 'how much should I drink' and I respond - - wait for it - -  IT DEPENDS, you will know why.  Actually conditions do not play as big a role in sweating as your body makeup does.  That's why some runners don't break a sweat until it's 70 degrees and others are dripping at 50 degrees.  To determine how much liquid to take during a run or race, you need to know your sweat rate, and that can vary between 1 and 4 quarts per hour. Weigh yourself nude before a timed training run, and then again after. One pound of weight loss equals 1 pint of water loss. Calculate your sweat rate and use this to determine your fluid needs during a run or race.  For example, if you lose 2 pounds during an hour run, that's 2 pints or 32 ounces. Thus, you need 8 ounces of water or sports beverage every 15 minutes. Remember, as little as 2 percent dehydration will have a negative effect on your race performance. 
There will be a quiz later :-)
 



WHY YOUR BALANCE IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE
Some of you have mentioned to me that you have had to get a bit more conservative (read - slower) especially during trail runs because you are just not as confident  in your balance. Reduced balance is a natural part of aging.  Understanding WHY will give you insight on how you can keep those nimble toes longer.
  Inside our ears is a balance center called the vestibular system that detects where our body is in space. Are we upright or lying flat, are standing on our feet or performing a handstand?  The vestibular system is connected to centers in the brain that also control our balance.  When the vestibular system and brain determine what we are about to fall over -as in tripping on a root or rock - the brain directs the body to take corrective action.
 As we age, cells in the vestibular system die off - sad, but that's life.  This affects how accurately we detect our position in space.  That, in turn, affects our ability to correct our position.  For example, if we start to tilt to the right and the vestibular system does not detect this quickly, it becomes harder for the brain to prevent falling to the right..
  Our sight, the ability to focus and see things clearly, diminishes with age. So do depth perception, night vision and sensitivity to contrast.  Eye problems can impair, blur or distort vision.  The loss of these visual cues compromises balance. You have probably seen a runner staggering toward the Finish with a pronounced lean to one side.  That is an affect of a malfunctioning vestibular system also.  The runner may not even be aware of the lean
  Blood pressure can dip suddenly when you stand up quickly, especially if you have been running for a long time, causing dizziness. lightheadedness, blurry vision, even fainting.
  Also, affecting our balance is muscle mass loss as we age. We lose power; a function of strength and speed, which affects balance as well.  If you start to trip, power helps you react swiftly.  Running and regular strength training can help keep strength and power, or at lest slow down the decline.
   I keep one of those 'party balance boards' nearby to practice on by seeing how long I can keep the edges from touching the ground.  It's great for strengthening the ankles as well.   Being proactive will not prevent the scourges of getting older but will help you not "go gently into the night" but fighting and clawing every step of the way.
 

2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Registration is NOW open for the  10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
 

 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd









 

CLICK HERE to register

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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