IN THIS ISSUE
DO YOU - CAN YOU - REALLY LISTEN TO YOUR BODY
YOU'VE MADE IT THROUGH 'PRE-SEASON', NOW FOR 'EARLY SEASON TRAINING PLAN'
2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
Routes and Photos
FIVE REASONS YOU ARE NOT IMPROVING
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 4 Jun
ArCCR 5k, 10k
Quiet Waters 

Sun 5 Jun
Quarterfield E.S. 5k
B&A, Marley Station

Sun 19 Jun
SPCA 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 19 Jun
TRUXTON TRI
Truxton Park

Sat 25 Jun
STOP the BLEEDING 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 July
CHESTER RIVER SWIM
Chestertown, Md

Sun 17 July
AA COUNTY STRIDERS
KID's TRI
Piney Orchard

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 30 July
ANCHOR RUN 5k
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

Sat 10 Sep
SPLASH DASH 5K
Crumpton, Md

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

 DO YOU - CAN YOU - REALLY LISTEN TO YOUR BODY? 

RonandBeau
  
Strengthening and lengthening the body is an often overlooked task for most endurance athletes. However, the benefits of spending just a few short sessions a week on stretches and strengthening exercises such as yoga or pilates are immense. Many endurance athletes are turning to workouts like yoga, pilates and other forms of core conditioning because they see significant performance gains due to increased flexibility, improved core strength and injury prevention.  Here is an article that will tell you more;  Strengthening the body
 
  Now is the time to be proactive in preventing injury.  Your training volume is ramping up and that always means greater chance for injury.  If I could sum up the "secret" to staying injury free, it would be LISTEN TO YOUR BODY. It is like one of your kids who will keep turning up the volume on their pleas until you respond to them. ACT EARLY and you can avoid something that will impact your training.  ASK QUESTIONS. There is a lot of experience in your fellow runners and LOTS of proven self-imposed remedies that can save you a lot of doctor's bills.  A rule of thumb I use for a injury/soreness, no matter how slight, is to do something about it right away - ice, self-massage. If it persists more than a couple of runs, alter your running to reduce the stress on the injury; do a bike instead of a run, for example. If it does not show improvement in about a week - get help.  To me that means getting a massage; trigger point therapy and/or deep tissue is great because they can isolate the injury and help identify the root cause.  I think chiropractic adjustment is extremely valuable to runners. No one has perfect body mechanics and symmetry. Running for multiple hours will magnify ANY slight anomaly to the point of discomfort. High arches, low arches, leg length difference, muscle imbalance, are just a few of the things you will never notice in day to day activities but at the end of a 20 mile run - you WILL know.  Also, massage specialists and chiropractors tend to be much more attuned to runners than MD's.  Their first response is not going to be 'don't run' and 'take these pain-killers' and 'come back in two weeks'.  Now there are SOME things that may get to the point needing a specialist in orthopedics, like torn cartilage in the knee, but you will know a lot more about the injury and what has worked and not worked before you get to that point.
 

YOU HAVE MADE IT THROUGH THE 'PRE-SEASON' NOW FOR
'EARLY SEASON TRAINING PLAN'
EARLY SEASON
You are ready to start your season when you feel injury free, mentally refreshed and possibly a pound or two heavier from pre-season ice cream.
There is a saying about successful running that aptly describes the early season: "You've gotta put the hay in the barn." In other words, you have to do the work, little by little, to reap the benefits, however unglamorous it may be. The early season is all about simplicity: Understand the best way to shovel the hay, and you'll be ready for your best season yet.
Goal: Build your durability, aerobic threshold and neuromuscular efficiency.
Duration: Four to 12 weeks. If you are building mileage for a longer race, it's important to spend more time in this phase. If you're in a rush to get to hard workouts and peak performances, the early season can be shorter.
 
Methods
Apply these four principles to fill your barn with the highest-quality hay:
1. Build your base. Start at 40 to 60 percent of your sustained weekly mileage from the middle of the previous season, emphasizing frequency of runs over length.
Howe cautions that runners should anticipate the soreness that may result after a proper off-season: "The return to running can make you feel like King Kong plodding along on the trail." After she gets over the initial sluggishness, Howe increases her mileage by no more than 10 percent per week until reaching her goal weekly mileage.
In general, the more miles you run per week, the faster you will race, so the early season could be the most important block of all. The mileage should all be comfortable, which doesn't necessarily mean slow. If you feel frisky, pick up the pace at the end of base-building runs.
2. Stride it out. Nate Jenkins, a 2:14 marathoner and Team USA runner, swears by the power of strides to build running efficiency and economy. "I personally use them after every run, and I recommend athletes use them two to four times per week," he says.
On strides, start relaxed and accelerate to the fastest pace you can sustain with smooth, comfortable form. Four to eight intervals of 20 seconds are enough to push you to a speed breakthrough.
3. Maintain your strength and flexibility. Keep doing the little things you started in the pre-season to avoid muscle imbalances that could lead to an injury.
4. Get to your fighting weight. With increasing mileage but no formal workouts, now is the time when it should be easiest to operate at a caloric deficit and lose weight without risking injury. As Dalzot says, "Stop complicating things!" Focus on eating whole foods and lots of vegetables and hydrating adequately.
 
Structuring Your Early-Season Week: The 3:2:1 Method
On the triathlon website Slowtwitch, the "BarryP Method" is spoken about in reverential tones. The man behind the method, Barry Pollock, is a former elite runner whose coaching methods have guided countless athletes to personal bests. Pollock created a system that distills running down to its simplest.
Here is how it works: Each week, do three shorter runs (the "1" in the 3:2:1); two medium runs, each twice as long as one of the shorter runs (the "2"); and one longer run that is three times as long as a shorter run (the "3"). Thus, if you're running 20 miles per week, you'd do three two-mile runs, two four-milers and one six-miler.
Barry explains why the method has resonated with runners and triathletes alike: "It's a good way to stay consistent on a weekly basis, while still getting in a variety of efforts throughout the week ... The six runs per week approach is preferable to running less frequently, as it provides a safer way to increase the total training volume while minimizing the risk of injury." Add some strides, increase your volume each week and you'll be ready for your best season yet. 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... GO!
 

2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Registration is NOW open for the  St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k -and-
10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
PRICES ARE GOING UP!
 
Prices are going up for the 2016 Across the Bay 10k and the 
2016 St. Michaels Running Festival.
 
CLICK HERE to register for the Bridge Race before prices go up on January 2nd
 
CLICK HERE to register for the St. Michaels half marathon or 5k before prices go up January 4th
 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd
St. Michaels
5k
$40
$45
January 4th
St. Michaels
Half Marathon
$80
$90
January 4th
 

CLICK HERE to register

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #228, 4 JUNE 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 
"You know a dream is like a river, ever changing as it flows.
And a dreamer's just a vessel that must follow where it goes.

Trying to learn from what's behind you and never knowing what's in store makes each day a constant battle just to stay between the shores.

And I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry.
Like a bird upon the wind, these waters are my sky.

I'll never reach my destination if I never try,
So I will sail my vessel 'til the river runs dry.

Too many times we stand aside and let the water slip away.
To what we put off 'til tomorrow has now become today.

So don't you sit upon the shore and say you're satisfied.
Choose to chance the rapids and dare to dance the tides."
 
Can you tell me the author?

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 6 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).
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NOTE:  The 2016 MARATHON, HALF MARATHON, and ULTRA Training Plans are posted - ta da.
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A SPECIAL THANKS to Jamie who sent a check to cover FOUR MONTHS of Port A Pot donations!!!

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In case you were not feeling inadequate enough, Tom Goodridge passed on the progress of his wife, Carla's latest adventure. Carla, 76 years young, owner of two knee and one hip replacements, is a week into her bike ride across the country.  She and her group are not taking the traditional East to West conventional route. Oh no, they are going diagonally 4200 miles from Georgia to Washington State.
  Currently they are in Kentucky.  There have been a couple of falls and a dog bite but they are making good progress.
  I have asked Tom to give us periodic updates.  Truly amazing.

Here is a photo of some of our KIRG contingent enjoying a Track Session at Kent Island H.S.
I have invited them to "experience" the 'Bears' with us one Saturday

Debi and I got a 'good' Rosaryville Loop in today (Wednesday) to test the hip.  Trails were muddier than expected but all w
ent well but a bit muggy.  Beau decided to take a cooling session in the creek. 


John Curley, Tom and Nancy Zorn, and I will be 'Crewing' for Jim Le Clare this weekend as he tackles the OLD DOMINION 100 MILE RUN near Woodstock VA.



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The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

FIVE REASONS YOU ARE NOT IMPROVING AS A RUNNER

 

There's no magic bullet when it comes to running. There's no "weird little trick" that will make you faster.
But don't despair! Here's the good news: There is so much that you can do to improve your running, and it's less complicated than you might think.
While there are myriad ways to tweak your running for improvement, most of them fit pretty neatly into five categories. These are: supplementary strength work, running volume, consistency, variation and the inevitable impact of nonrunning activities. While there is some overlap among each of these categories, it's ideal to try to address all five in some capacity if you want to get the most out of your training. Here are five common mishaps that can keep you from realizing your running potential:

1. You're only running.
Runners are a frequently injured bunch. Some studies show injury rates for runners as high as 60-65% annually! Running consistently is more than half the battle you have to fight to improve, but in order to do that you need toprevent injuries. You might be surprised to read that if you're only running - and not supplementing with any strength or core work - then you're not doing enough.

Running is a demanding and repetitive sport, and it can be hard on your body if you don't take the time to strengthen the muscles that support you. As you progress and start to get faster, there's a tendency for your aerobic fitness to outpace your structural fitness. That means you'll get faster before your body is ready to handle the extra speed, which can result in injury.
Since many of us have lifestyles that are largely sedentary outside of our workouts, our bodies aren't always prepared to handle the stress of running. And most of us don't have the time or energy to add endless hours of strength training to an overflowing schedule.

Fortunately, even a small amount of regular strength training improves our structural fitness and allows our bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles to support us and stay healthy while running.
Simple Solution: Perform 10-15 minutes of core work or strength exercises after each run.

2. You're not running enough.
While everyone has a sweet spot when it comes to mileage, running more miles does not have to mean more injuries. It's not higher mileage that's inherently risky - it's the periods when you're increasing mileage that pose risks.
While all runners need time off and have seasons where they'll train more heavily than others, the key is not to let your base mileage dip too low. While there is no exact number that's right for every individual, here's an example to illustrate this principle: If your high mileage weeks peak in the 40s, then it's beneficial to keep your lowest base mileage weeks in the 20s.

Runners who tend to get injured the most are the ones who stop and start often, or take frequent weeks or even months off. They are constantly in a cycle of trying to rebuild, which puts them at a greater risk for injury. If there is any magic bullet to running, it's that running more mileage, more consistently, will help you improve.
Simple Solution: Stay consistent with how many days you run each week, even when you're not training for something specific. It's all too easy to get off track when you start skipping runs on a regular basis.

3. Your training is inconsistent.
Inconsistency will thwart even the best intentions and can be your worst enemy when it comes to improving your running. Consistency, on the other hand, is your best friend. Because running is cumulative over months and years of training, consistency is what allows you to weave together a running career of which you can be proud.
Inconsistency can crop up in several areas, from mileage and number of runs per week to speed workouts. Sometimes it's due to an unavoidable overload in other areas of your life, but a lot of the time it's simply a result of losing focus or motivation or not following a quality training plan.
Stay consistent by focusing on the little things that motivate you to get out the door on a regular basis, whether it's a goal race, fundraising and training for a cause, catching up with a friend or just enjoying the energy that comes from starting your day with a run.
Simple Solution: Find a plan that works for you, and stick with it! A coach will provide the most personalized schedules, but there are plenty of great resources and training plans available to keep you on track.

4. You need more variation.
First consistency, now variation? Yes, you need them both. Although this may sound contradictory to the previous point, the key is knowing when to apply each principle. Here are some areas of running where you want variation:
  • Types of runs: Easy, moderate and hard running all have their place. If you want to keep improving, you don't want to run the same pace and distance every day.
  • Workouts: These will vary depending on what type of race you're training for. But over the course of a week, your workouts should include variety ranging from moderate tempo runs to difficult race-pace intervals.
  • Running surface: Many of us spend a lot of time on the roads, but the constant pounding can be tough on your body. Vary the surface you run on each week, and include some trails and softer surfaces. Your feet and legs will thank you.
  • Shoes: It's ideal to rotate among 2-3 types of shoes each week. This is yet another way to minimize the repetitive nature of running. You may want to try a lighter, more minimal shoe for speed sessions and a more supportive shoe for longer or recovery runs.
Simple Solution: Make each run have a purpose. When your run is supposed to be easy, don't be tempted to push too hard. And when you have a key workout, give it your all. Avoid constantly staying in that "too-hard-to-be-easy-but-too-easy-to-be-hard" zone that provides minimal benefit.

5. The rest of your life is holding you back.
The life of an elite runner is set up to provide the greatest possibility for improvement and success. They often run twice daily, get 8-plus hours of sleep along with a midday nap, have regular massages and bodywork - and spend hours on core and strength sessions in addition to their running. But that schedule is an impossibility for 99% of us.
There are lessons to be learned here, however. Even if we can't replicate their schedules, we can certainly incorporate some of their habits into our own training.
Here are several things that may be affecting your ability to improve:
  • Get enough sleep: This is your body's prime time for repair and recovery. If you're training hard, you aren't going to recover well if you don't get enough rest. Don't burn the candle at both ends.
  • Pay attention to your nutrition: Don't worry about what is the "best" diet. Simply focus on eating more real, whole foods. If you put your energy toward adding more fruits and vegetables into your diet and minimizing sugar and processed foods, you'll have a fantastic "whole-food" diet. This becomes increasingly important as your mileage builds.
  • Limit life stress: Build a schedule that works with your life. Try to plan your training and races in a way that works with your current schedule and reduces stress, rather than an idealized one. When major life events happen, let running be an outlet rather than an added stress.
  • Keep up with body maintenance: Maybe you can't get a massage every week like the elites do, but you can certainly book one on occasion and keep up with self-maintenance, like foam rolling, at home.
Simple Solution: Don't try to change too many things at once. Make simple, sustainable changes, like getting to bed 15 minutes earlier each week or adding more vegetables to one meal each day.
Don't let any of these reasons keep you from running your best. If you're looking to improve, addressing any (or all) of these options is a great place to start.


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Ron

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