IN THIS ISSUE
HOW QUICKLY DO YOU LOSE FITNESS- REALLY?
Routes and Photos
GENERAL INFORMATION
INCREASE YOUR BLOOD VOLUME-GET FASTER
WHY MEN DROP and WOMEN DON'T
2018 TRAINING SCHEDULE
JOKE OF THE WEEK
KIRG TRAINING PLANS
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 9 June
Paddle for 1st Responders
Leonardstown, Md

Sat 9 June
CROFTON 5k/10k
Crofton, Md

Sat 16 June
Stair Climbers Tunnel to Towers
Baltimore, Md

Sat 16 June
WE SALUTE HM/10K
Truman Parkway

Sun 17 June
TRUXTON KID's TRI
Truxton Park, Annapolis

Sat 23 June
SWIM FOR LIFE
Chestertown, Md

Sat 30 June
Bethany Christian 5k
Quiet Waters Park

Sun 8 July
METAvivor Adventure Race
Hillsmere, Annapolis Md

Sun 15 July
AACS Odenton Kid's Tri
Odenton, Md

Sun 22 July
Rosaryville 10k, 10M, 25k, 50k
Trail Runs
La Plata, Md

Sun 29 July
ANCHOR RUN
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 4 August
LCol Ben Moore Memorial HM/10K
Truman Parkway

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 26 May
LADY of STAR
Solomon's Island

Sat 26 May
LIFE IS GOOD
Leonardtown, Md

Sat 2 June
Sandy Point Paddle Board Race
Sandy Pt

Sat 2 June
Beltsville/Mushafa 5k
Beltsville, Md

Sat 9 June
Paddle for 1st Responders
Leonardstown, Md

Sat 9 June
CROFTON 5k/10k
Crofton, Md

Sat 16 June
Stair Climbers Tunnel to Towers
Baltimore, Md

Sat 16 June
WE SALUTE HM/10K
Truman Parkway

Sun 17 June
TRUXTON KID's TRI
Truxton Park, Annapolis

Sat 23 June
SWIM FOR LIFE
Chestertown, Md

Sat 30 June
Bethany Christian 5k
Quiet Waters Park

Sun 8 July
METAvivor Adventure Race
Hillsmere, Annapolis Md

Sun 15 July
AACS Odenton Kid's Tri
Odenton, Md

Sun 22 July
Rosaryville 10k, 10M, 25k, 50k
Trail Runs
La Plata, Md

Sun 29 July
ANCHOR RUN
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 4 August
LCol Ben Moore Memorial HM/10K
Truman Parkway

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

QUESTIONS ABOUT
PROPER
TRAIL RUNNING
APPAREL

RonandBeau
Q1 - Do you wear minimalist shoes or maximalist shoes (or something in between) and why?
  Wow!  Is the next question "boxers or briefs?" :-)
Tell me if you have heard this before, 'it depends'.
 I have minimalists for shorter, less technical trail runs; Five Fingers.  I NEVER use them on roads or bike trails.  Although I am a fan of the book "Born to Run", but I do think minimalist shoes are only for those willing to put in the time to adapt to them properly.  I really like the feel of the ground they give you; very solid and reassuring.  I don't like the intense stress they put on the calfs, or the time it takes to recover.
At the other end of the spectrum, I have HOKA 1's that I use for longer, moderate to low technical trail runs and road runs.  Initially, I liked the extra cushion on rocks (pointy AT rocks) and frozen mud; but eventually I got a sense of unbalance on rocks, like being on stilts.  I really like them for road runs.  They take much of the pounding stress out of running on asphalt.  My 'go to' shoes are mid-drop, zero-last, nuetral Asics (2050's model), Brooks,  and Under Armour.  I also have some MERRILL's mid-minimalist drop that I really like for mid-long moderate technical runs.  Yes, I keep all those shoes in play.  I keep track of the mileage on each pair to help guage wear and resilency.
 
Q2 - Blisters often make or break a race.  What socks do you recommend for preventing blisters in an ultra?
 
Another 'it depends'.  Sorry.  I do a lot of matching my socks to the shoes I am wearing for any particular run - not color matching, but how they fit.  I do not pay too much attention to brands.  The absolute key to preventing (or at least, minimizing) blisters is - fit. That means socks as well as shoes.  For example, my  Merrill's are a bit snug, so I wear a thinner pair of socks.  My Brooks and HOKA's have a little more forefoot room so thicker socks work. Actually, for longer runs, my preference is a pair of INIJA toe socks with another pair of thin socks over the top.  It really minimizes the friction.  Add a layer of Body Glide or BUTT BUTTER (chamois sauve for bikers) and I very rarely get blisters.  Of course, the calouses built up over 30 years helps.
 
Q3 - Hydration packs come in either bottles or bladders.  What are the benefits and drawbacks of each?
 
    I have probably tried them all.  For years, I did JFK 50 with a 60oz Camelback Waist.  I loved it but it chaffed by lower back, unless I cinched it up so tight I could barely breathe.  I still use it but shifted to a standard shoulder 70 oz Camelback which works great - except when the tube froze solid (corrected when I ran the tube under my shirt and armpit and out the jacket neck).   For shorter runs I use one or two handhelds; Camelback or Ultimate.  Last year I got the mid-size Ultimate two 16 oz bottle (in the front) vest.  I like being able to see how much fluid I have left in each bottle; as opposed to 'feeling' how much water is left in the bladder.  I also like being able to put an electrolyte mix in one bottle and plain water in the other. I do wish it had more and larger pockets.  It worked great for TRANS ROCKIES and I could add a bladder into the pocket on the back if carrying extra fluid was necessary.
  For bottles or bladders, a key element for me is the ease with which I can get fluid through the nipple.  I like the kind you squeeze with mouth and suck, vice the kind you have to pull a detent to open the flow.  I keep pinching my lip with the latter.   I also don't like the handhelds that you have to twist or pull to open.  Simple is always better, especially eight hours into a run or in the dark.
 
Q4 - What do you think is the best all-around pack for trail running?
 
 The one that works for you.  Camelback has a lot of varieties.  Ultimate is coming up with some very practical models designed and tested by some elite trail runners.  My advice is to figure out what is important to you - comfort, lots of pockets, easy fluid flow, etc. - and experiment.
 
Q5 - What is your personal favorite race shirt?
 
Hmmm?  Last year I took all the race shirts I have collected over the years and had blankets, afgans, pillows, and stadium blankets made out of them - 32 in all.  My point is that -everyone of them is my favorite.  This way I can look at them and let the memories flow about that particular race.  However - I put my HAWAII IRONMAN, Angeles Crest 100, Vermont 100 (denim shirt), TRANS ROCKIES 120 Mile/ 6 Day Run and my (first) 1984 JFK 50 shirts at the top. 
 
  You are an 'experiment of one' :-)

 
"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  
 
 Fatigue is voluntary.
 
  You are an 'experiment of one'
  
 
DIFFERENT RACES, DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT EVERYTHING.
 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far t
hey can go."   

CAN YOU ACCLIMATIZE
 TO HEAT?
Proactively acclimatizing to hot weather before standing on the start line of a toasty hundred mile race would seem like the most logical thing to do; however it may actually be of no greater importance than what you do to manage the heat on race day. Put another way, you could show up to a race maximally heat adapted and still succumb to heat related performance issues due to not taking steps in the moment to mitigate the effects of hot weather on the body's physiological processes. This reality is the mindset-calming equivalent of an ice cold can of Coke applied first to the neck, and then poured down the hatch.

For those of you, who are potentially facing triple digit temps to match a triple digit race distance, here are some things to consider to keep your 'A' goals from evaporating:

Premature Hammerheads Need Not Apply - Avoid the inclination to run the early, cooler miles faster than you otherwise would in an effort to "bank time" to make up for the inevitable slowing down during the midday heat. The pacing penalty for early withdrawal will likely find you bankrupt on energy with a large balance of miles still due. Instead, stay within your comfort zone, adjusting your effort as need be with the heat, and bide your time for the late afternoon and evening cooldown. If you have properly taken care of yourself from a pacing, fueling, hydrating and cooling perspective, time and temps will now be on your side and you will be able to pull the most rare and invigorating of 100-mile running tools from the kit: the closer's hammer.

This Ain't "Skinemax"... - There are a lot of filmographers in ultra these days, but even if you feel like you've sculpted a silver screen physique, keep covered up. You don't necessarily need to wear a bright white, full coverage sun protection kit like you often see the Badwater runners wearing, but going shirtless or wearing just a sports bra for hours on end in intense sun, even with every square inch of exposed skin smeared in sunscreen, will sneakily drain you of energy. Besides, less clothing equals diminished ability to accomplish perhaps the most important race day heat mitigation tactic...
If you know where this is on the Western States trail then you know that cooling waters are also nearby. 

...But It Is A Wet T-Shirt Contest - Get wet and stay wet. Every opportunity. No exceptions. Aid stations. Creeks. Carry an extra water bottle for sporadic spraying on the move. If you find yourself fixating on the seconds - or even minutes - you're spending dousing yourself and soaking your shirt thoroughly, visualize a juicy grape turning into a shriveled up raisin. That will likely be you if you skimp on the wetness. The effectiveness of this form of enhanced evaporative cooling cannot be overestimated. I am not aware of any scientific studies demonstrating that grapes are faster, but the anecdotal truth is definitely in the raisin pudding.

Ice Ice Baby - If you are fortunate enough to have ice provided at aid stations, utilize it. Put some cubes under your hat; in your sports bra. With so much blood flow near the surface, the neck is a great place for the slow, cooling melt of frozen water. I have a Buff I have cut open, folded a corner over and safety-pinned closed to create a pouch I can quickly stuff ice into and tie around my neck. There are likely now products on the market designed specifically for this purpose...but I had a Buff and safety pins (saved from race bib pinning, of course) to spare and it's fun to get creative.

Hydration In Moderation - When not heat acclimated it may seem sensible to think one way you can compensate is by drinking a ton of fluids, both plain water and electrolyte/carbohydrate drink mix. This can quickly lead to bloating and nausea as your body has not adapted to processing the higher volume of liquids. When your vehicle's temperature gauge starts to rise and the fluid levels are normal you don't attempt to alleviate the problem by overfilling the coolant and oil reservoirs; instead, you slow down and turn off the air conditioning. In other words, you reduce the level of stress being placed on the engine. The same rule applies to your body.
Salt In The Heat-Stress Wound - Ever notice that after those first few hot weather runs in the spring your clothing and/or skin is usually caked in salt crust? Eventually those sodium stains no longer appear as your body adapts by reducing the amount of salt lost through sweat. Maintaining ideal electrolyte balance is often tricky but when not heat acclimatized it is especially so, as simply taking in a lot more salt than you are used to can also lead to its own set of problems.

The water/electrolyte table presented by Karl King of Succeed S!Caps in the May 2007 issue of UltraRunning is still one of the best resources available. If the chart looks intimidating, that is simply because it mirrors the complexity of maintaining homeostasis, especially when pushing to extremes, both of distance and effort. Familiarizing yourself with the symptoms of various combinations of conditions can prove invaluable if it feels like a hyponatremic turd is about to hit the waterlogged fan, or vice versa.

Still not convinced that you can have a great hot weather performance without the benefits of strategic pre-race heat acclimatization? Rob Krar claims to have not done anything specific for heat adaptation before his Western States performances. He won the iconic race in 2014 and 2015. With highs in Auburn of 89 and 91, respectively, one could argue heat wasn't that great of a factor. In his debut in 2013 he finished second to repeat-winner and course record-holder Tim Olson. His time was 15:22. It was 102 degrees; the 10th fastest time on the course during the second hottest year. You can bet he mitigated like a master. It can be done.

 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

Spring/Summer Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
Week #312, 9 June 2018
===========================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

  
"The fearless are merely fearless. People who act in spite of their fear are truly brave." - working for your first marathon or ultra trail run - is brave."  
 
 
GENERAL INFORMATION

  
NOTE:  We are down to 3 months coverage for the TRUMAN PORT A POT -
-------------------------------------------------------------
 NOTE:  We were almost charge an 'abuse' fee for our Truman Port a Pot.  Apparently, the construction workers for the parking lot upgrades have been misusing it -a lot.
   So we have put a lock on the unit until construction is completed. For now, it is a key lock.  The key is wedged in the vent webbing under the roof lip on the right side. Please pass on to anyone else you know uses the unit.
==============================
 NOTE: The construction work putting in a traffic light on Truman Park way and moving the entrance to the Park N Ride is expected to be completed before the BEN MOORE MEMORIAL race, and will not change the course.

RUTLAND RD - Maintenance is ongoing to improve the flow of water from the pond to the stream.  If anyone knows the duration of work, let us know.
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BACON RIDGE NATURE TRAILS
 The Department BRNA (Bacon Ridge Nature Assoc) is continuing to work with MORE on a phase 3 of the multi-user trails.  After considerable review, onsite visits, and a number of challenges...it appears that phase 3 will constitute an additional 5 or so miles of new trail.  MORE has marked and mapped additional mileage for future consideration.  At this time, the facilitation of an archaeological review is being worked on to fine tune the route.  A full review of the area's cultural heritage will be great for future interpretation.  Ways to finance the cost of such a review are also being examined from various angles.  I can tell you after I took a hike, that the new section is beautiful, and will really showcase just how amazing BRNA is.  Details and paperwork in progress...so stay tuned.

We are hoping to have a new map for submission to MET and SRLT in the coming weeks.


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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE\

 - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE
YOU DO NEED TO KNOW YOUR 
SWEAT RATE

With the increasing temps expected to go even higher, quicker this summer, it is time for everyone to determe their Sweat Rate. 
 
 After the Eeewwwss and Yeccccks; it makes very good sense.   Everyone sweats at a different rate; some soak their shoes and socks and others 'glow', so when you ask 'how much should I drink' and I respond - - wait for it - -  IT DEPENDS, you will know why.  Actually conditions do not play as big a role in sweating as your body makeup does.  That's why some runners don't break a sweat until it's 70 degrees and others are dripping at 50 degrees.  To determine how much liquid to take during a run or race, you need to know your sweat rate, and that can vary between 1 and 4 quarts per hour. Weigh yourself nude before a timed training run, and then again after. One pound of weight loss equals 1 pint of water loss. Calculate your sweat rate and use this to determine your fluid needs during a run or race.  For example, if you lose 2 pounds during an hour run, that's 2 pints or 32 ounces. Thus, you need 8 ounces of water or sports beverage every 15 minutes. Remember, as little as 2 percent dehydration will have a negative effect on your race performance.

"
 

SO YOU'RE INJURED.
NOW WHAT?

Megan Roche wrote for Trail Runner about injuries.

 There's a saying that comedy is tragedy plus time. I would never wish injury on anyone, but perhaps injury plus time is just an opportunity to learn more about yourself and develop some comedic stories along the way.
You don't want the injury process to take too much time, though. The story doesn't need to feel like it's written by George R.R. Martin.
While time off can provide perspective, you get to a point where you have learned enough lessons and are ready to get back to the trails. These suggestions can hopefully go a long way in curing a case of the "What ifs," getting you back sooner and happier.

Advocate for yourself as a patient (kindly)
Doctors can be busy people. Some doctors see up to 30 patients a day and have as little as 10 minutes per patient. Like trail runners, doctors can take missteps, too. Outside of Dr. Paean, medical professionals are not infallible. If there's a diagnosis or timeline for recovery that doesn't seem right to you, kindly ask questions and seek to understand the rationale. If it still doesn't make sense, schedule a second opinion.

Given that medicine can be chaotic and appointments can take a long time to schedule, it's often beneficial to express your enthusiasm for running. Whether you are a professional or recreational runner, doctors love patients who are motivated to recover. Even expressing your love of running to the receptionist scheduling your appointment can mean the difference between having to wait four weeks and four days to get an MRI scheduled.
If you're going to research your own symptoms, be wary of Dr. Google, who is only board-certified in the field of OH MY GOD EVERY INJURY MEANS YOU ARE DONE FOREVER. Running message boards almost always have runners who never run again after suffering from IT (iliotibial) band issues, plantar fasciitis, talus fractures and hangnails. Conversely, what Google paints as a quad strain could actually be a femoral stress fracture. It's good to do research, but be mindful of the perspective you are getting.
If it's going to be a long haul, take some dedicated time fully off
Hard training is objectively hard on the body. Studies have shown that the endocrine system and the immune system can be compromised during periods of intense training. It's not surprising that many top runners take dedicated periods of time off each year. Often, that time off precedes a breakthrough.

Shalane Flanagan took 10 weeks off from running starting February of 2017 for a stress fracture before winning the 2017 New York City Marathon. Des Linden took time off from structured training in 2017 before winning the 2018 Boston Marathon. And most pros take an offseason where they don't do much of anything.
Cross training is great, but give your body some time to decompress first. Usually, a week or two is plenty, though everyone is different. Studies indicate you won't lose much fitness. Consider using the time off to get blood work to see if there are any underlying deficiencies that you can address while at rest.

An unplanned break can be tough to swallow. I've found that the first three days of a running break are the hardest as the body grapples with a change in routine and the brain deals with all the pent-up energy, like a puppy doing crate training to learn not to go to the bathroom in the house.
But with time, dedicated rest always seems to get better. New routines form and eventually the brain learns not to pee on itself.

Develop a cross training and physical therapy plan
Sit down with a coach, physical therapist or doctor and sketch out your cross-training plan once you've determined how much dedicated time you want off. Taking control of the time off can turn a passive struggle into an active training opportunity that will make you stronger when you return.
Anecdotally, I've seen athletes have success with high-RPM bike intervals (95-110 RPMs), which may prepare the body for the neuromuscular demands of running. A typical 3-day block would be:
Day 1: 10 min easy (95-100 rpm), 10-20 x 1 min fast (110 rpm)/1 min easy, 10 min easyDay 2: 10 min easy, 1/2/3/4/3/2/1 min fast with 1 min easy between each, 10 min easyDay 3: 30-60 min easy or rest
Depending on the injury, it can be helpful to layer in progressively more weight-bearing activities from there, progressing to the elliptical, the stair mill, Alter-Gravity Treadmill and finally to barefoot jogging on grass. Let pain be your guide-if you feel anything in the injury site, try a new activity (for most running injuries, swimming with a pull buoy between your legs is okay). And remember, physical therapy and correcting imbalances always has priority over hard aerobic training.

Running is not always dreamy in the return
During my recovery, I would fall asleep and have visions of myself prancing gracefully like a mountain goat covered in glitter (a mountain unicorn!). My first run back, however, was not mountaincorn-approved. Despite all my cross training, I felt horrible.
Don't get discouraged by your first runs back. Often, fitness is lurking, it's just running economythat is lacking. If you are patient with your return-to-run plan, things will gradually improve as your body adapts to the musculoskeletal stress of running impact and the neuromuscular demands of the running stride.
When will you be ready to return? That is highly dependent on the individual, so make sure your doctor approves of running before taking those first awkward-baby-gazelle steps. Even after getting the doctor approval, keep your runs extra short for 7-10 days and stop immediately if there is pain (some pain can be normal, but it's better to come back 99 percent too slowly than one percent too fast).

Running is just one part of your identity, not your whole identity
A few weeks before my injury, I jokingly asked my husband, "What do you think non-runners do with so much extra time?" Ironically, I answered my own question a few weeks later: they do awesome things.
Even when running is temporarily on hold, life has so many incredible things to offer. Go snuggle with a doggo, catch a sunrise or read a bestseller. If you are addicted to the dopamine hit from running, you can get dopamine in other ways too-invest more time into relationships, go out of your way to do nice things for others or crank up the rock 'n' roll.
When you do get back to running, you can have a deeper portfolio of things that make you happy. You might find out what lots of runners discover: the worst injuries can actually be the luckiest breaks.

2018 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

JOKE OF THE WEEK


HEY, WHO's BEEN
FOLLOWING ME? 
Kent Island Running Group is planning a new race! Mark your calendar for the inaugural Solstice Stomp 5K through Cascia Vineyards, planned for June 24 at 6:30pm. This unique evening race will wind through the lush vineyard, and the amazing after party features free wine tastings and live music in a picturesque waterfront setting. To register, go to https://www.kirg.org/solsticestomp/

 
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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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