IN THIS ISSUE
PAIN IS TEMPORARY
SURVEY OF RUNNERS PET PEEVES
STUDY: BRAIN STIMULATION CAN IMPROVE RUNNING PERFORMANCE
2017 TRAINING SCHEDULE
KIRG TRAINING PLANS
Routes and Photos
JOKE OF THE WEEK
RUNNING BY TIME OR DISTANCE
GENERAL INFORMATION
UNDERSTANDING GLYCOGEN
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 14 Oct
St Mary's Ryken 5k
Leonardstown, Md

Sat 21 Oct
MYOSITIS 5K
Centennial lake, Md

Sun 22 Oct
J.P. HOME 5K
Laplata, Md

Sat 28 Oct
QUARTERFIELD ES 5K
B&A Marley Station

Sat 28 Oct
SMILES by the BAY
Bay City, Md

Sun 5 Nov
GET IT TOGETHER
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 11 Nov
RUN 4 the WELL
Ridgely, Md

Sun 19 Nov
EDGE FDN 5k
Kent Island

Thur 23 Nov
ECHO Turkey Trot
Prince Frederick

Thur 23 Nov
CC YMCA Turkey Trot
Ridgely, Md

Sat 2 Dec
EDGEWATER FITNESS
Edgewater, Md

Sat 2 Dec
KENT ISLAND JINGLE BELL
Kent Island, Md

Sat 2 Dec
DENTON REINDEER RUN
Denton, Md

Sun 3 Dec
YMCA TURKEY TROT 5k/10k
CAMP LETTS, Mayo

Sat 16 Dec
JINGLE BELL RUN
Piney Orchard, Md


 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

PAIN -IS-TEMPORARY

RonandBeau
For those heading out for Marine Corps Marathon or any of the other area marathons - remember - "Pain is temporary- Pride is forever" is more than just a catchy phrase. 
 
WHY are YOU going to make it?
 
-Because YOU have spent the last five months preparing for this - you ARE ready.  TRUST your training.
-Because Lunch Hour means RUNNING six miles.
-Because no matter what it takes you WILL make it up Iwo Jima hill.
-Because you have committed yourself to do this - and that means something.
- Because you ARE a bit insane.
-Because you are realizing a DREAM that will be with you FOREVER.
-Because THERE WILL ONLY BE ONE FIRST MARATHON IN YOUR LIFE and THAT means something too.   
 
"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  
 
 Fatigue is voluntary.
 
Pay attention to your post race recovery.  Drink extra water for the next two days while your body rehydrates.  Take a Succeed tablet a couple of times and/or use extra salt on your meals.  Use Advil for the sore/stiff muscles and do some light stretching. Get a massage, if you can, but don't expect it to take away all of the soreness. You did a lot of deep damage to your muscles. DO NOT run until today/Wednesday at the earliest!  No problem if you don't run for the entire week.  Just do some walking, easy biking to get the blood flowing.  If you decide to run this weekend do so with ZERO expectations for time.

 
 fatigue is voluntary.
   
 
DIFFERENT RACES, DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT EVERYTHING.
 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far t
hey can go."   

SURVEY OF RUNNER'S
PET PEEVES
YOURS?
There are so many amazing aspects about running to enjoy. However, even the happiest runners have their pet peeves and bad habits. Reebok wanted to find out what exactly irks us the most.
The brand surveyed Americans, ages 16-44, who exercise weekly and run on a daily basis. In the process, they discovered some pretty funny statistics. For example, 46 percent of runners surveyed don't shower before they meet up with friends.
Reebok also compiled a list of top 10 running pet peeves. Among the list, there were two answers that annoyed the majority of runners. Over three-quarters of respondents said they hate when other runners make it difficult to pass. And 71 percent of those asked get aggravated when people run too close to them.
The answers were not all bad though. Only 6 percent said that they prefer to ignore others when running. So at least most runners agree-a nod or a wave is the way to go.
Find out what the rest of the running pet peeves were in the gallery below.
 
Study - Brain Stimulation Can Improve Running Performance
Research by the University of Kent into the effects of brain stimulation on athletes' performance has demonstrated that it is an effective way to improve endurance.
The findings are expected to advance our understanding of the brain's role in endurance exercise, how it can alter the physical limits of performance in healthy people and add further evidence to the debate on the use of legal methods to enhance performance in competition.
The research, which was conducted by Dr Lex Mauger and colleagues at Kent's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences (SSES), set out to investigate how endurance limits are a matter for the mind as well as the body.
By testing cycling time to task failure (TTF) in a group of 12 active participants in a placebo controlled study, Dr Mauger discovered that stimulating the brain by passing a mild electrical current (transcranial direct current stimulation or tDCS) over the scalp to stimulate it increased the activity of the area associated with muscle contraction. This decreased perception of effort and increased the length of time participants could cycle for.
The team explained this is because the exercise felt less effortful following stimulation. tDCS has been used to enhance endurance performance but how it achieved this was previously unknown and this study has helped identify the mechanisms.
Bilateral extracephalic transcranial direct current stimulation improves endurance performance in healthy individuals (Dr Luca Angius, Dr Lex Mauger, Dr James Hopker, and Professor Samule Marcora, University of Kent, with Professor Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation, Division of Cognitive Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Dr Emiliano Santarnecch, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA) is published in the journal Brain Stimulation.

 

2017 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Kent Island Running Group is planning a new race! Mark your calendar for the inaugural Solstice Stomp 5K through Cascia Vineyards, planned for June 24 at 6:30pm. This unique evening race will wind through the lush vineyard, and the amazing after party features free wine tastings and live music in a picturesque waterfront setting. To register, go to https://www.kirg.org/solsticestomp/

 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

JOKE OF THE WEEK
I PASSED A COUPLE HOLING HANDS WHILE RUNNING.....IT MADE ME HOPEFUL THAT ONE DAY I WILL MEET SOMEONE WHO WILL HATE THEM WITH ME
BWAHahaha !!!

PORT  A   POT  Donation
Winter/Spring Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #293, 21 OCT 2017
===========================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

  
"Success is not measured by what you accomplish but by the opposition you have encountered, and the courage with which you have maintained the struggle against overwhelming odds."    Orison Swett Marden 
  
RUNNING BY - 
TIME OR DISTANCE

If you get a group of running coaches in a room and ask them this question, a sequel to Fight Club will break out almost instantly.
In one corner, a coach played by shirtless Brad Pitt will advocate for time-based training. Coach Shirtless Pitt will say that that running by distance presents perverse incentives to run faster to finish the daily total, which can contribute to injury and burnout. Time-based running makes a runner less aware of pace feedback, avoiding the unnecessary stress of self-judgment from a GPS watch.

In the other corner, Coach Shirtless Edward Norton would say that races are almost always defined by distance, so training by time is not specific enough. When training for a trail marathon, for example, doing a three-hour long run can be a great peak long run if it's 20 miles. But if it's only 13 miles, it's probably not enough.
jogging-women.jpg

In the end, there is no wrong way to quantify training. My athletes do most long runs and weekend runs by distance, to gain distance-specific stress adaptations. During the week, we usually train by time, since many athletes are time-limited. And all intervals are in time, so that athletes aren't racing a GPS watch.
If you don't have a coach, the key is to know thyself. Do you stress about your pace? Then run by time. Do you love crunching numbers? Train by distance. Are you a runner of many different-possibly even split-personalities? Then mix it up based on your time constraints and training goals
.  


GENERAL INFORMATION
  TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM

==================================== 
CONGRATULATIONS - To SARAH GOODRIDGE BELL on completing IRONMAN MARYLAND - 2.4 Mile SWIM; 112 MILE BIKE; 26.2 MILE RUN - in the sun and wind of Easter Shore.   WELL DONE Sarah!!

--------------------------------------------------------------
THANKS!  To Derek Ammons for his donation to our Port A Pot.
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NOTE:  We are down to 7 months coverage for the TRUMAN PORT A POT -
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We have revived our TRACK SESSIONS JOIN US at AHS Track on Tuesday's at 5:30-ish.  If you want to take 30 secs/mile off your pace - Let me know.
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BACON RIDGE NATURE TRAILS

Michael Klasmeier of Trailwerks passed on that the layout and design for the final phase of construction for Bacon Ridge is being finalized. For phase 3, as we are calling it, we will be extending the trail system to connect to Farm Rd and Bacon Ridge Rd on the north end. We'll be connecting the middle-north and western-north portions of phase 2 to the Farm Rd area and lower beaver dam ridge, respectively. We expect to add approximately 12 more miles of trails to the system, including a loop at the corner of Chesterfield and St Stephen's Church.
 
Please let us know if you would like to hike in and check out the draft trail alignment we are working on. Much of it parallels the 2010 corridor suggested by Dan (with IMBA at the time) with a few major changes. The changes reflect our desire for more sustainable trail with less excavation on some steep slopes that will require less maintenance in the long run.
 
We are hoping to have a new map for submission to MET and SRLT in the coming weeks.


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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE\

 - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE
Understanding Glycogen, Your Body's High-Performance Fuel
Put 100 runners around a pre-race dinner table, and they won't agree on much. Training talk may cause shouting matches; shoe talk could cause friends to come to blows over terms like "drop" and "stack height." But one thing most would agree on is what to eat-a big pasta buffet.
Pasta has earned its vaunted place at pre-race meals everywhere because of its impact on glycogen. You have probably heard the term "glycogen" bandied about before, and you may have even used it yourself when ordering your pre-race meal.
I know that when I order at restaurants, I am implicitly saying, "I'll have the large glycogen pizza, please, with a side of glycogen breadsticks." But what is glycogen, and how can you use it to avoid the dreaded bonk?
 
The Basics
Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored in the liver and muscles that acts as a fuel source for exercise. Glycogen metabolism is the process by which these stored carbohydrates are used as fuel, involving many enzymes with chemical compositions that fill a quarter of a page. While the glycogen-to-fuel process is complex enough to fuel many PhD dissertations, the basic takeaway is that excess carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles, turning pasta into performance.
Among other things, the breakdown of glycogen is used in ATP synthesis, which is essentially how energy transfer happens in cells. Even though glycogen only accounts for a minimal amount of total stored energy in the body, lower-burning fat takes too long to go through the same process to fuel sustained moderate exercise, so at around 55 to 65 percent of VO2 max for most athletes, glycogen stores become essential to maintain performance levels (though exact intensity depends on many athlete-specific factors).
Think of fat and carbohydrate burning on a spectrum, with high-intensity efforts involving mostly carbohydrates and low-intensity efforts involving mostly fat. Both energy sources are important for running.
According to cycling expert Dr. Iñigo San Millán, at race pace, most athletes will burn two to three grams of carbohydrate per minute. Even at lower intensities, most athletes will burn one to two grams of carbohydrate a minute (though this rate can be adjusted with training). Most athletes store 300 to 500 grams of glycogen when fully fueled, equating to about 90 to 120 minutes of intense exercise.
Glycogen burns rapidly but is refilled at a drip, usually replenishing at a rate of two to five percent per hour after exercise. Empty glycogen stores can take a full day or more to restore.
Three ways glycogen is important for endurance athletes.
1. Glycogen fuels performance for most trail runners.
If your training and racing goes beyond low-level aerobic exercise, you will need to use glycogen to perform at your peak potential. According to a paper in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, chronically low glycogen stores in athletes can cause fatigue and even induce a "catabolic" state involving muscle breakdown by requiring the body to rely on proteins and amino acids for fuel. That is one reason why low energy availability over time may contribute to a reduction in performance, and even overtraining syndrome.
2. Glycogen re-synthesis can improve recovery.
As outlined by an article in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, because glycogen helps muscles recover and avoid cannibalizing themselves for fuel after high-intensity exercise, replenishing glycogen can preserve muscles and accelerate recovery. Topping off glycogen stores will help you get ready for another run sooner.
3. Training in a glycogen-depleted state can enhance some training adaptations and improve aerobic efficiency.
While the body generally needs glycogen to perform at a high level, it can be trained to use its glycogen stores more strategically. An article in the journal Sports Nutrition outlines how running in a glycogen-depleted state can enhance markers for adaptation to training and make the body better at burning fat. Some top ultrarunners like Zach Bitter and Jeff Browning take it one step further, using a low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) diet to train their body to burn mostly fat at relatively fast paces. However, LCHF diets are complex and controversial, and should be undertaken solely for training purposes when preparing for low-intensity events, at the advice of an expert.
 
How should you maximize glycogen fueling in your own training?
1. Train with adequate glycogen stores by eating carbohydrates in your daily diet.
Don't overthink things. Just prioritize a balanced diet rich in healthy carbohydrates like whole grains, along with plenty of good fat and rich protein. Since glycogen levels take many hours to fill up, what you ate yesterday is often more important than what you eat the morning of. Avoid food restriction and eat guided by hunger.
2. After runs, prioritize replenishing glycogen through carbohydrate intake.
After exercise, the body is aching to top off glycogen stores. Chocolate milk is often cited as a good post-run drink due to its mix of carbohydrates, protein and fat. While it's hard to think of a more delightful nutrition suggestion, any similarly carbohydrate-rich food will work.
3. During runs, replenish glycogen as you go.
As glycogen levels drop, so, too, does performance for most athletes. For runs long enough to begin burning stored glycogen (usually 60 to 90 minutes or longer), practice refueling as you go. For most athletes, 200 to 300 calories per hour of mostly carbohydrates-like gels or sports drink-is a safe bet, adjusting for body type and background.
4. You can't replenish glycogen as fast as you can burn it, so temper your effort level.
In events 90 to 120 minutes and below, if you start with full glycogen stores, you can pretty much go as hard as you'd like and avoid low-glycogen bonking. Over that, you need to pace yourself to avoid running on empty.
As a thought experiment, imagine that a typical athlete has about 360 grams of carbohydrates stored as glycogen, and can replenish 60 grams per hour while burning 180 grams per hour. With no carbs, the athlete goes two hours until bonking. Even with adequate carbs, the athlete will bonk in less than three hours. So the key is to reduce the amount of carbohydrates burned per hour by reducing intensity so the body can burn more fat. In other words, pace yourself to achieve the optimal fat-to-carbohydrate burn rate to avoid bonking.
My general glycogen-related pacing guideline is: you can go hard in events less than two hours, moderately hard in events two to three-and-a-half hours (glycogen can mostly be replenished at strong efforts), moderate for events three and a half to five hours (when fat burning becomes more important), easy/moderate up to eight hours and easy and conversational in anything over that.
5. Do some runs (including some longer runs) in a glycogen-depleted state.
You can use glycogen depletion as a tool to enhance training adaptations. An approach I use with some of the ultra athletes I coach is to do every third long run at very low intensity in a glycogen depleted state (no carbohydrates since the evening before), doing back-to-back long runs every month (even with normal fueling, this type of schedule causes glycogen depletion naturally) and doing short doubles on one or two workout days most weeks. However, to keep it simple, you can just do your daily morning run without breakfast occasionally. (Note: Dr. Stacy Sims, author of the book "Roar," indicates that glycogen depletion may be less useful-and possibly detrimental-for some female athletes due to hormonal shifts. Very few of the professional female athletes I coach aim for glycogen depletion in a structured way, though will sometimes do back-to-back long runs and doubles for other reasons.)
 
 
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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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