IN THIS ISSUE
EXACTLY WHY DO YOU RUN?
MARYLAND MILLION 5K
HOW TO MAKE CRAZY WORK FOR YOU
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
LEARN HOW TO RUN SLOW
VINEYARD DASH 5K - WINE!
2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE
Routes and Photos
UP COMING EVENTS

Sun 4 Sep
GRAND NATL PEOPLE CHASE 5K
Adamstown, MD

Sat 10 Sep
STRUGGLE 4 REAL
Glen Burnie

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sat 15 Oct
MARYLAND MILLION 5K
Laurel Race Track
Laurel MD
Details/Reg

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

EXACTLY WHY DO YOU RUN?


RonandBeau
 
 


 
 
 


  
At some point, all of you have heard me ask you "make sure you know WHY you are doing this".  Training for a marathon - or longer - is not something to undertake on a whim, or because a friend is, or to lose weight.  You have also had someone ask you "why you are doing this?"  You have probably heard my standard response when I am asked that question; "some people collect stamps".  It is somewhat trite but easier to go into  because during a long run there comes a point when the psychological separation between "me" and "everything else" becomes blurred - the metaphysical equivalent of "a oneness with nature".
  
  At this point in your training, it is a good time to read this article - and reaffirm to yourself WHY you are doing this. 
  The article below, captures that concept I struggle to explain - to non-runners, and you.  Now not all of "us"  struggle with the ravages of severe depression as Danielle, the author of this article, but we ALL can, and do, have "things" going on in our lives that can (are) benefited by running.
 
   
 

MARYLAND MILLION 5K
Participants will burst from the starting gate and run down the homestretch through the finish line in front of the grandstand(due to uneven terrain, strollers and pets are not permitted on this course). All participants are welcome to join us at the winner's circle for awards and post-race refreshments. Come experience this fun and unique race! 


HOW TO MAKE BEING A
'CRAZY RUNNER'
WORK FOR YOU

David Roche wrote in Trail Runner a great article appropro to some of you .

Many of us are crazy. And that is O.K.
Running is a grueling, mostly solitary pursuit that requires a strange type of persistent motivation. For a serious runner, that motivation needs to survive terrible injuries, catastrophic failures and life-threatening nipple chafing. While trail running does have a lot of rainbows and butterflies, it also has its fair share of lightning strikes and monsters.

What type of person persists when others move onto a kinder hobby, like knitting or Netflixing? In my coaching experience, those of us who decide to be lifelong runners make up a strong-willed herd of free-range wackos.

Being full-blown looney tunes about running has its positives. It allows us to accomplish amazing things when others would have stopped many years and up to two intact nipples ago.
But it also has its downsides. We can think too much, overanalyze things and even sabotage our health and happiness. We all know of runners whose obsession has had tragic consequences, encompassing everything from shorter-term injuries and discontentedness to longer-term, life-altering issues like overtrainingeating disorders and depression. The same thing that makes us great and fulfilled can make us unhealthy (and hurt our performance).

It's essential to lift any stigma associated with this way of thinking so we can confront our crazy and try to keep the benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls. Here are two questions to ask yourself every day to make sure you keep your relationship with running healthy and happy.
 
1. Think long-term.
How can I make myself a happy and healthy runner three years from now?
In running, daily decisions determine long-term health. It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking solely about a workout later in the week, or a race a few months away, instead of thinking more about the adventures in years to come.
Short-term planning like this causes people to run through injuries, do workouts they don't want to and ultimately develop a purely results-oriented perspective that rarely leads to long-term fulfillment.

I recommend the three-year plan. 
Whenever you make running-related decisions, ask yourself whether it will make you better in three years. With this perspective, you won't push through injuries, worry too much about missing a workout or overtrain.
When I met Corrine Malcolm in 2014, she was coming off a series of major injuries as she transitioned from elite biathlete to elite trail runner. We sat down and made a three-year plan together, with a focus on long-term development over immediate trail-running success.
At first, we kept Corrine's mileage lower than we could have, and the workouts weren't quite as tough. The goal was solely health and running-specific aerobic development. She probably sacrificed just a bit of her potential in 2015 due to the conservative approach.
Then, in 2016, she reaped the rewards of long-term thinking. A year ahead of schedule, Corrine won the US 50 Mile Trail Championships by prioritizing consistency over short-term success. Most importantly, using this approach, we are both excited to see where running takes her in another three years.
 
2. Keep perspective.
What does running mean to me and why?
On our fridge, my wife and I use Post-It Note reminders. While our to-do list and grocery needs change constantly, our running goals always stay the same. That Post-It just says, "Fudge it. It doesn't matter. So have fun and enjoy the process." (Actually, it doesn't say "fudge," but you get the idea.)
Across the elite athletes I coach, I have found that those who have had the "Fudge It" moment in their running careers generally have a healthier relationship with running. We all run for a lot of different reasons, all of which can be valid. But at the end of the day, it only has the meaning you give it. So sit down and choose the meaning it has for you.
Clare Gallagher, who won the Leadville Trail 100 over the weekend, put it wonderfully in a recent interview. When asked about her thinking when running 100 miles for the first time, she said, "My main goal was to remember not to take myself too seriously. Climate change matters and democracy matters. Community and family matter. This doesn't matter."
Not being overly serious allowed Clare to smile her way to the second-fastest time in the history of the race.
So learn to strategically embrace your running crazy. By lifting the stigma and asking yourself the big questions, you can maximize your trail joy, as well as your performance.
 

Registration is NOW open for the  10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
 

CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd








 
CLICK HERE to register

OUR SPONSORS
 
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SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #240, 3 SEPT 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

Everyone has excuses - good ones - 'winning' is when you become better than your excuses'
TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 5 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).

THANKS - to Terri Brown for her donation to the Port a Pot
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NOTE:  Just a heads up to anyone that runs on Chesterfield road. The County is going to be closing Chesterfield Road between Hawkins Road and St. Stephen's Church Road to repair/replace the small bridge on that section of road. The latest news says the closing will not happen until after the REN FAIR until next January. Don't worry, I'm sure we will find a way to cross - can't deny getting to run that hill. 
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 
  LEARN HOW TO
RUN SLOW


The key to running fast is learning to run slow. I have said that so often that it's practically my version of a coaching campaign slogan. Make Aerobic Development Great Again!
But what does it mean, and how do you do it? Of all the questions I get, these are probably the most common. People struggle to define how fast their everyday, non-workout runs should be. Sad!
And these questions are the most important ones you will ask in your running career. There are countless stories of athletes who learned to slow down, which kept them healthy, which allowed them to run more, which made them faster.

For example, every runner in Boulder has seen the Japanese Olympic team doing their training camps on the surrounding trails. Most of the time, they are running at a pace similar to a sedated sloth. But sometimes, they are running like antelopes on amphetamines. This polarization of training is necessary for higher volume, which is necessary for training and racing breakthroughs. 

Slow runs give us a chance to appreciate the sights and sounds of the trail.
The easiest way to pinpoint your everyday pace is through a heart-rate monitor. The classic formula for less experienced runners is 180 minus age as a cap on your heart rate during most runs.

However, that formula is crude and controversial. (It'll be too fast for elites and experienced runners, and sometimes too slow for people just getting started). Most of us use perceived exertion to determine our running speeds anyway.

So for most of us, running easy and slowly enough is a mystery. Here are five tips to make sure you run slow enough on your easy days.
 
1. Run conversationally with friends
If you can hold a conversation about Donald Trump's Twitter feed without gasping for air, then you are probably running easy enough. My rule is three complete sentences at a time.
 
2. Run conversationally with your dog
Dog jogs are a great way to control speed. Also, the biggest advantage of all-dogs can't talk about human politics!
 
 
3. Do the breath test
If you don't have a friend or a dog, you would make a good main character in a sad country song. But there is still a way to see if your breathing is controlled.
I am a solo runner, and I use the breath test. If I can hold my breath for five steps mid-run without changing my pace, then I know my heart rate is controlled enough.
 
4. Make photography your workout
As runners, we get a unique perspective on the world that most people never even think about. Use that perspective to take photos!
Try to take one photo each run and post it on your social media. Looking for that perfect photo opportunity will have you relaxed and exploring new places. Stopping to take the photo will ensure you aren't chasing your fastest time or a Strava segment. And posting the photo will help dilute all of the political posts on Facebook. Wins all around!
 
5. Wear your slow shoes
We all have that one pair of shoes that are rock solid but with limited upside, sitting neglected in the corner. If you put those on, you won't have the urge to hammer an easy run.
 
Putting it all together, keep most of your runs easy. In general, less experienced runners should only run hard one to two days per week, and more experienced runners can run hard one to three days per week. The rest of the time, try to practice slow running as much as possible.

REMEMBER - You are an experiment of one :-) 

 
VINEYARD DASH 5K
10 SEPT 2016
For the past 6 years, the Layton family has welcomed participants to run in the Vineyard Dash 5k. Layton's Chance Vineyard & Winery in Vienna, MD will host the 7th Vineyard Dash September 10th, 2016. For the Layton family, the race combines three passions: their pristine farm and vineyard, their hobby of running, and of course the delicious wines. The Layton family has developed a passion for running that spans 3 generations and want to share their running trail and their wines with you.
But deeper than the Layton's love for running is their connection to Dorchester County. The Vineyard Dash 5K will be benefitting the IronClub Maryland which supports the only full length IRONMAN triathlon in the Mid-Atlantic region coming up in October in Cambridge, MD.
The Vineyard Dash 5k is an off road-race through the 15 acres of vineyards on the property. It is the kick-off for the 7th Annual Harvest Festival which feature hayrides, pony rides, grape stomping competition, live music, and all day family fun! Following the race, all racers over 21 will receive a complimentary glass of wine. Every racer will receive a free t-shirt, goodie bag, and free admission into the 7th Annual Harvest Festival.
The Vineyard Dash 5K is September 10, 2016 at 10 am. Registration is $35. The 7th Annual Harvest Festival will immediately follow the race from 11 am to 6 pm.
4225 New Bridge Road Vienna, MD 21869

 

2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

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