IN THIS ISSUE
ASSESS YOUR MENTAL HEALTH
YOU'VE MADE IT THROUGH 'PRE-SEASON', NOW FOR 'EARLY SEASON TRAINING PLAN'
Routes and Photos
EXERCISE MAY CUT RISK OF 13 TYPES OF CANCER
2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 4 Jun
ArCCR 5k, 10k
Quiet Waters 

Sun 5 Jun
Quarterfield E.S. 5k
B&A, Marley Station

Sun 19 Jun
SPCA 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 19 Jun
TRUXTON TRI
Truxton Park

Sat 25 Jun
STOP the BLEEDING 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 July
CHESTER RIVER SWIM
Chestertown, Md

Sun 17 July
AA COUNTY STRIDERS
KID's TRI
Piney Orchard

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 30 July
ANCHOR RUN 5k
Ft Meade, Md

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

Sat 10 Sep
SPLASH DASH 5K
Crumpton, Md

Sat 10 Sep
VINEYARD 5K
Lanyard, Md

Sat 10 Sep
PATRIOTS DAY 5K
Great Mills, Md

Sun 11 Sep
JUSTRYANIT KIDS TRI
Balt. Md

Sat 17 Sep
RUN 4 RESEARCH 5K
Solomon's Island, Md

Sat 17 Sep
PREGNANCY CLINIC 5K
Rockbridge, Md

Sat 24 Sep
GLEN BURNIE IMPROVEMENT ASSOC 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 24 Sep
RIDGEWAY DIGITAL DASH 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 25 Sep
KTS 5k
Kent Island

Sun 25 Sep
LIGHTHOUSE SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON & 5K
Quiet Waters

Sat 1 Oct
ARUNDEL VFD 5K/10K
Crownsville, Md

Sun 16 Oct
ORSO 5k
Millersville, Md

Sat 22 Oct
GRACE POINT CHURCH 5K
Millersville, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

 ASSESS YOUR
MENTAL FITNESS 

RonandBeau
 For athletes, , the body may be ready and willing to perform, but the mind... not so much. Self-doubt, nerves, uncertainty, frustration, distractions, hesitation, fear, intimidation - all of these are obstacles to accessing your full physical potential. The body that you work so hard to train can be derailed, in a moment, by a limitation in mental fitness. 

But what does "mental fitness" mean, really? The effortless integration of body and mind, working in harmony to produce a feeling of flow, of being in the elusive zone? Well, yes, that's a glorious experience when (if!) it happens, and working on your mental skills makes it much more likely that it will. But for most of us, mental fitness is most often about using your mind on your mind. It's about using images, feelings, thoughts, memories, actions, relationships, and words - including, perhaps, words from someone who believes in you - to clear the obstacles out of the way. 

Strengthening Your Mental Skills To develop a plan for strengthening the mental side of your game, you need to be honest with yourself. What are your mental and emotional strengths? Where do you struggle? Your self-awareness is crucial, and it's not just about selfassessment. It's about self-confrontation. Why? Because exploring your mental/emotional limitations and how they're affecting your experience on the bike... well, your ego may not like that process. If it feels threatened, it may try to hide some of the truth from you, or keep you away from the territory altogether. The strongest part of you - the part that wants you to grow and knows you can handle how it feels to really know your limitations - needs to override your ego. And if at first, you need some help with the process - from a friend, a family member, a coach, a sport psychology professional, or a psychotherapist - so be it. Sometimes others can see things about us that we can't - or won't. And sometimes others have just the right suggestion, if only we give them a chance. In this kind of work, it takes strength to feel and show vulnerability. And that just leads to more strength within. 

In taking stock of your mental fitness, first evaluate your proficiency (say, on a 1 to 10 scale) with the 5 Core Skills: * Goal-Setting: Do you have goals for your riding, training, and/or racing? Do you monitor your progress and modify your goals if need be? Is cycling in balance with the rest of your life? Do you overtrain? As management guru Peter Drucker taught, set goals that are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Timebound. Set not only outcome goals (eg., "Finish in the top 10,") but process goals as well (eg. "Keep good form and contact with the group on every climb.") Check in regularly to make sure your goals are still right for you. * Positive Self-Talk: Does the voice in your head sound like a good coach or a bad coach? Are you using your self-talk to help you perform at your best during challenging times? Or is it making it harder for you? Does it often compare you negatively with other people? You can learn to stop negative thoughts, to reduce the anxiety that fuels them, and to replace negative thoughts with the kinds of questions, counterstatements, affirmations, cue words, and positive actions that make your self-talk work for you, rather than against you. * 

Managing Emotions: Do you manage - and use - anger and aggression effectively? Have trouble sleeping before events? Do you ever hesitate or back off when you should attack or sprint? Ever get pre-race or pre-event jitters? How do you handle pressure? How do you handle the risk of falling on a trail run? Stress, anxiety, tension, nerves, fear: they're the most common bugaboos for amateur and professional athletes. Your positive self-talk and breathing techniques are tools you can use on the bike, and you can add in such tools as visualization as part of effective pre-event stress management. * Concentration: Can you stay focused when you want to? How quickly do you refocus when you get distracted? Do you know which one of the four focus styles is yours? It's critically important to know your top distractors and have a plan for what to do if they arise. And many athletes can tell you that it's wise to have a pre-event preparation routine that gets you to the start line focused. -

Communication. How well do you communicate with others. family, friends, teammates, coaches, competitors - from the heart? How well do you embrace and manage conflict? Then, assess your mastery of the more advanced skills: * How are you at managing your will and your limits - do you know when you're pushing too hard, and when you're not pushing hard enough? * Speaking of which, how much can you suffer? Can you always give everything to stay on a wheel, stay in a break, catch back on, ride solo to the finish? * Can you sustain your motivation for training, riding, or competing if anything threatens to dampen it? How do you respond when things don't go your way? And specifically, how skilled are you at recovering from injury and crashes? Write down all of the above skills and the score you're giving yourself for each. Make sure you're not being too hard or too easy on yourself. Most likely, if you work successfully on any skill that's a 7 or below, you'll see an impact on your riding. Developing a plan to do that work involves knitting together the steps that feel right to YOU.

YOU HAVE MADE IT THROUGH THE 'PRE-SEASON' NOW FOR
'EARLY SEASON TRAINING PLAN'
EARLY SEASON
You are ready to start your season when you feel injury free, mentally refreshed and possibly a pound or two heavier from pre-season ice cream.
There is a saying about successful running that aptly describes the early season: "You've gotta put the hay in the barn." In other words, you have to do the work, little by little, to reap the benefits, however unglamorous it may be. The early season is all about simplicity: Understand the best way to shovel the hay, and you'll be ready for your best season yet.
Goal: Build your durability, aerobic threshold and neuromuscular efficiency.
Duration: Four to 12 weeks. If you are building mileage for a longer race, it's important to spend more time in this phase. If you're in a rush to get to hard workouts and peak performances, the early season can be shorter.
 
Methods
Apply these four principles to fill your barn with the highest-quality hay:
1. Build your base. Start at 40 to 60 percent of your sustained weekly mileage from the middle of the previous season, emphasizing frequency of runs over length.
Howe cautions that runners should anticipate the soreness that may result after a proper off-season: "The return to running can make you feel like King Kong plodding along on the trail." After she gets over the initial sluggishness, Howe increases her mileage by no more than 10 percent per week until reaching her goal weekly mileage.
In general, the more miles you run per week, the faster you will race, so the early season could be the most important block of all. The mileage should all be comfortable, which doesn't necessarily mean slow. If you feel frisky, pick up the pace at the end of base-building runs.
2. Stride it out. Nate Jenkins, a 2:14 marathoner and Team USA runner, swears by the power of strides to build running efficiency and economy. "I personally use them after every run, and I recommend athletes use them two to four times per week," he says.
On strides, start relaxed and accelerate to the fastest pace you can sustain with smooth, comfortable form. Four to eight intervals of 20 seconds are enough to push you to a speed breakthrough.
3. Maintain your strength and flexibility. Keep doing the little things you started in the pre-season to avoid muscle imbalances that could lead to an injury.
4. Get to your fighting weight. With increasing mileage but no formal workouts, now is the time when it should be easiest to operate at a caloric deficit and lose weight without risking injury. As Dalzot says, "Stop complicating things!" Focus on eating whole foods and lots of vegetables and hydrating adequately.
 
Structuring Your Early-Season Week: The 3:2:1 Method
On the triathlon website Slowtwitch, the "BarryP Method" is spoken about in reverential tones. The man behind the method, Barry Pollock, is a former elite runner whose coaching methods have guided countless athletes to personal bests. Pollock created a system that distills running down to its simplest.
Here is how it works: Each week, do three shorter runs (the "1" in the 3:2:1); two medium runs, each twice as long as one of the shorter runs (the "2"); and one longer run that is three times as long as a shorter run (the "3"). Thus, if you're running 20 miles per week, you'd do three two-mile runs, two four-milers and one six-miler.
Barry explains why the method has resonated with runners and triathletes alike: "It's a good way to stay consistent on a weekly basis, while still getting in a variety of efforts throughout the week ... The six runs per week approach is preferable to running less frequently, as it provides a safer way to increase the total training volume while minimizing the risk of injury." Add some strides, increase your volume each week and you'll be ready for your best season yet. 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... GO!
 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
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SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #227, 28 May 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 
"Do not be desirous of having things done quickly. Do not look at small advantages. Desire to have things done quickly prevents their being done thoroughly. 
Looking at small advantages prevents great affairs from being accomplished." Confucius

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE now have 6 months of Port A Pot coverage left. (see below).
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NOTE:  The 2016 MARATHON, HALF MARATHON, and ULTRA Training Plans are posted - ta da.
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On a sadder NOTE - I got the following note from Moore's Marine's Grad, Jamie Brown
"A bit of news on my end - I got a new job and will be moving to CT. I will be back in town 17 JUN, so I may be out there for a last run on the bears.
I cannot thank you enough for all of your help getting me going with running. I have many fond memories of the group and my growth experience into the running culture.
I am so grateful for your guidance, advice and continued fun.
Thank you for everything.
Jamie
BTW - I am running CHI marathon this year with Bro and Sis, along with a few half marathons."

Many of us were there as Jamie sweated through a lot of summers and froze over a lot of winters while training and running on Truman/Defense Hwy.  He complained more than some but less than others, but he always showed up and met his marathon goal.  Even as his family and responsibilities grew - he always showed up.  I am sure I speak for all of out 'family' wishing him 'fair winds and following seas' - and the promise to come see us when he can. 
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A SPECIAL THANKS to Jamie who sent a check to cover FOUR MONTHS of Port A Pot donations!!!

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The cortisone shot seems to be working - sort of. It's still a little tenative but I'm doing some easy 'test' runs.  Leslie Kriewald passed on that she is dealing with the same problem and will be getting the therapy injections soon.  She promised to let me (us) know how it goes.  The more you know now could help you if you are ever faced with the same issue.  In running it's always deja' vu all over again.
   Barb Hamilton, Jim Le Clare, Beau and I went for run at AHS trails Saturday. Barb was sounding like a duck before we finished.  
Our fearless KIRG leader, Trudy Humphrey's and Alex also ventured out for a "run in the rain" on the Kent Island Cross Island Trail. 



Last week, I passed on that Bo Bland has completed the 

C&O 100 MILE RUN the  week before.  His father, and Moore's Marines Grad, Stu Bland, and mother were his crew.  If you have a curiosity what one looks like during and after a 100 mile run, Stu passed on these photos of Bo. 









(Let me know if I missed anyone's accomplishment.  We don't often get much recognition but it is nice to see your name in a newsletter to fellow runners.)
 
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The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

EXERCISE MAY CUT RISK OF 13 TYPES OF CANCER - YEP!

 
by Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Exercise may significantly reduce your risk for many types of cancer, including some of the most lethal forms of the disease, a large review suggests.
Working out for even a couple of hours a week appears to shrink the risk of breast, colon and lung cancer, said researchers who looked at 1.4 million adults.
"Those are three of the four major cancers that affect Americans today," said Marilie Gammon. She is a professor of epidemiology with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Public Health.
And fitness buffs, take heart -- your cancer risk appears to continue to decline as you rack up hours of physical activity, with no apparent upper plateau, said study lead author Steven Moore, an investigator with the U.S. National Cancer Institute.
"The more activity, the more the benefit," Moore said. "As people did more, their risk continued to lower."
It should be noted, however, that the study only found an association between exercise and reduced cancer risk; it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.
In the study, regular exercise wound up being linked to a reduced risk of 13 cancers in all, the researchers said. The others were leukemia, myeloma and cancers of the esophagus, liver, kidney, stomach, endometrium, rectum, bladder, and head and neck.
Current federal guidelines for exercise -- 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity -- are aimed at heart health but also serve well for cancer prevention, Moore said.
Moderate-intensity exercise involves pursuits such as brisk walking or tennis, while vigorous intensity exercise involves heart-pumping activities such as jogging orswimming laps, according to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
For this study, Moore and his colleagues focused on leisure-time physical activity performed outside work or household chores. "This is voluntary physical activity typically done to improve health," he said.
About half of all American adults don't meet the federal minimum recommendation for exercise, the study authors said in background information.
Prior research has linked exercise to reduced risk of breast and colon cancer, but no study has attempted to look at the effect of physical activity on many different types of cancer, Moore said.
The researchers pooled data from 12 U.S. and European studies to create a database of 1.4 million adults, aged 19 to 98. They then examined whether self-reported physical activity made a difference in risk of 26 cancers.
Exercise was associated with a reduced risk for half of the cancers considered by the investigators, and that reduction remained significant for nearly all, even after accounting for factors such as obesity and smoking history.
Overall, a higher level of physical activity was associated with a 7 percent lower risk of total cancer, the researchers reported.
The range of reduced risk ran from 42 percent for esophageal cancer to 10 percent forbreast cancer, the study authors said. For colon and lung cancer, risk was lowered 16 percent and 26 percent, respectively, the findings suggested.
"This suggests that physical activity may have a role to play in population-wide cancer prevention efforts," Moore said.
The findings were published online May 16 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.
No one is certain why exercise seems to help fend off cancer, Moore and Gammon said, but there are some leading theories.
Physical activity reduces levels of hormones, such as estrogen, that have been linked to different cancers, and helps control levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor, Moore said.
People who work out also tend to have lower levels of inflammation, Moore said. Their cells appear to be subject to less oxidative stress, and are more capable of repairing damaged DNA that might cause cancer, said Gammon, co-author of an editorial accompanying the study.
Gammon said she was most pleased with the 42 percent risk reduction found in esophageal cancer.
"That's pretty amazing, because it's a very deadly tumor," she said. "I think the average length of survival is 11 to 12 months after you're diagnosed."
Other very deadly cancers that appear to become less common with exercise include those of the liver, stomach, kidney, and head and neck, Gammon said.
"Having a strategy to help reduce risk of those cancers is very good, because your outlook is not optimal once you're diagnosed," she said.




2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon  HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 Our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Registration is NOW open for the  St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k -and-
10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
PRICES ARE GOING UP!
 
Prices are going up for the 2016 Across the Bay 10k and the 
2016 St. Michaels Running Festival.
 
CLICK HERE to register for the Bridge Race before prices go up on January 2nd
 
CLICK HERE to register for the St. Michaels half marathon or 5k before prices go up January 4th
 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd
St. Michaels
5k
$40
$45
January 4th
St. Michaels
Half Marathon
$80
$90
January 4th
 

CLICK HERE to register

PORT  A   POT  Donation
We need your donation.

 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

I can now accept credit card donations; with secure, receipt verification.

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003