IN THIS ISSUE
NEW REBOK SURVEY SHOWS HOW MUCH TIME WE SPEND EXERCISING
HOW TO TRICK YOURSELF INTO A HARDER WORKOUT
THE CASE FOR THE 1 MIN WORKOUT
Routes and Photos
THE LATEST WORD ON COMPRESSION WEAR
2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
UP COMING EVENTS

Sat 21 May
REIG SCHOOL 5k
Bowie, Md

Sat 4 Jun
ArCCR 5k, 10k
Quiet Waters 

July 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK
Details/ Register

Sat 24 Sep
GBIA 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

   

NEW REBOK SURVEY SHOWS WE SPEND - LESS THAN 1% OF OUR LIFETIME EXERCISING
RonandBeau

Hate exercising? Most of us do. While the rush of endorphins that hits after you collapse on a treadmill is nice, it's often not enough of an incentive to go back to the gym (or the running track, or your bike) for another go. Instead, you might want to veg out with your iPad or make the most of you time here on earth eating that burger monstrosity which has a calorie count higher than the number of steps you've ever taken in a single day. But while we'd like to continue living in blissful ignorance about our exercise habits until the new year rolls around again, a new study has made it impossible to sit up (counts as exercise!) and not take notice of how little time we devote to physical fitness.
The study was funded by Reebok and conducted by Censuswide, which looked at how we're all spending the approximate 25,915 days (an average of 71 years) that many of us will live. And the results are sobering. According to the survey, which studied more than 9,000 people around the globe, we spend less than one percent of our lives devoting time to physical fitness (approximately 180 days), while spending more than 41 percent of it (10,625 days) staring at screens, and 29.7 percent of our lives sitting down. That's approximately 7,709 days of just sitting, and while it doesn't sound so bad (although many of us would probably prefer to spend more of that time laying down) it's definitely something that could contribute to both lower life expectancy as well as a lower quality of life. And if you're reading this and thinking "I'll definitely put that on my resolutions list," you should know that the average human breaks a New Year's resolution less than three months after setting it.
It's unlikely that any of us are going to take Reebok's suggestions and run around the world or climb Mount Everest, but the results are a gentle reminder that you might want to buy a new pair of running shoes and at least try to make it outside to take a nice walk every couple of days. After all, the sense of self-satisfaction you'll get from knowing you did something to make yourself a little healthier might actually spur you to do more. Or it may just give you enough of a lift that you'll live just a little longer anyway. As long as you don't reward your hard work with a double bacon cheeseburger. 
 HOW TO TRICK YOURSELF INTO A HARDER WORKOUT 

It's no secret that fitness is a mental game. Now there's research that suggests even overweight, sedentary adults can trick themselves into working harder in the gym.
study in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercisefound that if you work out in short intervals as opposed to long stretches, it will feel easier, even if you're doing the same amount of work overall.
This type of high intensity interval training, commonly referred to as HIIT, has been on the rise in the fitness world. Researchers have proven the benefits of short, intense bursts of exercise: they can burn more fat, increase levels of fitness, improve blood pressure and increase muscle activity.
There seems to be an interval-training sweet spot, the new study suggests. In it, researchers observed unfit and overweight adults as they did two types of exercise: heavy continuous exercise without a break, and three different intervals of exercise during which they rested for 30 seconds on and off, then 60 seconds on and off and 120 seconds on and off. The exercisers reported thinking that the 120-second trial would be the hardest, and they indeed perceived that shorter bursts were easier, in spite of the fact that they were all the same intensity. Short intervals of one minute or less may be a way to trick yourself into working harder, simply because it may seem easier, the researchers conclude.


THE CASE FOR THE 1 MIN WORKOUT
There's a lot of talk in the exercise world about high intensity interval training (HIIT) lately, which is exactly what it sounds like - alternating episodes of exercise with periods of less intensive activity or recovery. It's not an new idea, although many gyms, trainers and some experts are touting it as if it's a new phenomenon. Professional and elite athletes have been using interval training for nearly a century to maintain their peak performance with the least wear and tear on their bodies. And it's baked in to workouts like SoulCycle, Cross Fit and many group classes at gyms.
But the concept of HIIT is gaining more momentum lately thanks to research that's starting to show that such regimens can actually have the same health benefits as continuous, longer workouts-even if the intervals of exercise add up to as little a 60 seconds of burn. 
 Of course, that doesn't mean people are working hard for 1 minute in a whole day. It's about alternating within a workout.

In the latest study, published in PLOS One, exercise scientists led by Martin Gibala, chair of kinesiology at McMaster University, who has spent the last several years documenting the health benefits of interval training, found that as little as one minute of intensive exercise could have the same health benefits for the heart, respiratory fitness and muscles as 45 minutes of more typical continuous exercise over three months.

Granted, those 60 seconds have to be at a sprint-like pace, as if you're being chased down by a tiger and fueled by adrenaline. But it's just 60 seconds. "I think there is good evidence that shows you can see comparable benefits despite the fact that intervals require less total exercise and reduced time commitment," says Gibala.

The key in how little you can get away with, however, depends on how hard you push yourself during those short bursts of activity. "The extent of reduction in total exercise and time commitment is related to how hard you're willing to push yourself," he says.
It's also probably related to interspersing the high intensity activity with periods of less vigorous exercise and recovery. It's not just a matter of pushing for one minute and being done. In the study, the people in the interval group rode stationary bikes for two minutes to warm up, then pushed themselves to ride as fast as they could for 20 seconds, then rode more slowly for two minutes and repeated this pattern two more times for a total of 10 minutes.

And the beauty of interval training, as studies like Giabala's are starting to show, is that no matter how you incorporate it, you will reap rewards.
If you're sedentary and starting to walk regularly, for example, pushing yourself to walk as fast as you can for a few blocks or past several neighbors' mailboxes, then resuming your more moderate pace, and alternating this a few times might allow you to shorten your walks so you don't have to spend, say 30 minutes walking, but only 10 or 15 minutes to get the same benefits.

Similarly, many popular exercise and training programs also incorporate the idea of less is more to keep you fit - cycling classes that push you over mountains and then allow you to coast along flats or rowing classes that switch between all-out rowing and more measured activity are all examples of interval training.

So if you're already a gym rat or take long runs or swim miles in the pool, should you switch the way you work out? "The best exercise is the one you like because you are more likely to stick with it over time," says Gibala. "If you enjoy continuous exercise and hate the discomfort that goes along with interval training, even though it might be effective and time efficient, then you're unlikely to sustain it long term, so you're better off staying with your current program."
But given the growing data showing the health benefits of interval training, there's a more debate among exercise experts and public health officials about whether they should be encouraging or promoting interval options to people. While it may not be right for some, for others, the brief periods of exertion might be worth the time savings. Some studies show that despite the discomfort of the intensive periods of activity, some people felt it was a fair trade off for not having to exercise as long.

Plus, it seems that interval training could be safe for people of all fitness levels, as long as they adjust for what intensive and all-out physical activity means for them, In Gibala's study, the people who participated weren't very fit to begin with, and didn't exercise much. But the group that did the one minute of all-out exercise did show similar improvements in their fitness as the people who spent 45 minutes in continuous moderate intensity activity. And presumably, as they got more fit, they could push themselves harder to reach more vigorous levels of activity during the high intensity bouts. So you don't have to be in shape to benefit from interval training. And if you don't have time to devote to lengthy workouts, it might be an easy way to get started to become more physically active.
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
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SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS
 
 Week #226, 121May 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 When Ben Moore addressed his Marathon Training group the first year I was there, he said:
""Here's how you run a marathon.
      Step 1: You start running.
      Step 2: There is no step 2 until they put the medal around your neck" 
TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 
 
ALERT - WE have 3 months of Port A Pot coverage left.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am still struggling with the ischeal tuburosity hamstring tendon tear (yes, it WAS a tear, not a strain )  - or otherwise known as the 'sitz bone'.  It was not showing much improvement - at least the improvement I thought it should be showing.  I finally yielded and  got an appointment with my old friend and Moore's Marine's grad, Dr Bill Tham.  Bill specializes in pain management. When I went into his office, he chuckled and said he was usually seeing someone I referred to him, rather than myself.  We talked about the genesis of the injury and decided to try a cortisone shot initially. I think he put in about a pint.  
Next, I will evaluate the progress over the next week with some light 'testing'.  If it is still aggravating me, the next step would likely be a prototherapy (sp?).  Like cortisone, an injection is made directly into the compromised tissue - and surrounding tissue.  The injection consists of a sugar type solution that has shown to inhibit inflammation (like cortisone) but has additional properties that draws nutrients and healing proteins to the sight.
  I was feeling a little depressed at this RonBeau rain run
protracted recovery - and the loss of fitness. Basically, feeling sorry for myself, so I took Beau for a run in the rain at AHS trails.  That helped a LOT.
  Stay tuned - and be careful out there. 

(Let me know if I missed anyone's accomplishment.  We don't often get much recognition but it is nice to see your name in a newsletter to fellow runners.)
 
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The days are getting longer which means more time to get a TRACK SESSION in before it turns dark.  We should start looking at getting our speed work session done. 
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

THE LATEST WORD ON COMPRESSION WEAR

 
New research published in the latest European Journal of Applied Physiology casts doubts on the physiological benefits of compression clothing - often used by cyclists to aid training - but has found an improvement in athletes' perceived recovery.
Researchers in Australia tested eight highly trained field hockey players and measured blood lactate, inflammation levels and perceived recovery. The athletes were put through two match simulations, four weeks apart. After one simulation the players wore compression shorts, and after the other loose trousers, for 24 hours post exercise.
The researchers regularly blood tested the athletes for lactate and inflammation indictors, and noted that levels were "significantly elevated" after both matches. However, the compression shorts appeared to make little difference relative to the loose trousers.
Researchers also questioned the athletes on perceived recovery and noted a significant improvement, and reduced muscle soreness.
Compression clothing such as socks and shorts is a favourite of athletes because it's believed to aid recovery by boosting blood flow and flushing toxins out of hard-working muscles. Its physiological effectiveness has always been subject to debate. 
Earlier this year, researchers from the Department of Sport Science at the University of Wuppertal, Germany, conducted a review of original academic research papers and found little improvement in athletic performance related to compression wear.
 o.


2016 TRAINING SCHEDULE

coming soon HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 As the days continue to be dark early and start to get colder - and wetter; our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up in early 2016, like DISNEY; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Registration is NOW open for the  St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k -and-
10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
PRICES ARE GOING UP!
 
Prices are going up for the 2016 Across the Bay 10k and the 
2016 St. Michaels Running Festival.
 
CLICK HERE to register for the Bridge Race before prices go up on January 2nd
 
CLICK HERE to register for the St. Michaels half marathon or 5k before prices go up January 4th
 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd
St. Michaels
5k
$40
$45
January 4th
St. Michaels
Half Marathon
$80
$90
January 4th
 

CLICK HERE to register

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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003