IN THIS ISSUE
What have you LEARNED from running?
HOW TO COPE IF YOU CAN'T RUN FOR A WEEK OF TWO
2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE
ACROSS the BAY and ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
What NOT to do after your Marathon
Routes and Photos
UP COMING EVENTS
   


13 Feb
MID -MD  50k 
- near Patapsco; up to 5 laps
 
14 Feb
GW Birthday Marathon
 - Greenbelt, Md
10:00am Start

Sat 20 Feb
FROZEN HEART 50K
Details/ Register HRE

 
27 Feb
HASHAWAHA 50k
 - Westminster, Md

5  Mar -
 SENECA CREEEK 50k or Marathon
- Gaithersburg, Md

Sun 13 Mar
 Casey Jones SHAMROCK 5k
La Plata, MD

Sat 19 Mar
.CRUMPTON VFD 5k
Crumpton Md

Sat 19 Mar
BOWIE SPRING 5K
Bowie, Md

Sat 19 Mar
GRAND NATIONAL PEOPLE CHASE 5K
Adamstown, Md
 
Sat 2 Apr
PASS IT FORWARD
Millersville, Md

Sat 2 Apr
5k FOR THE BAY
Quiet Waters

Sat 9 Apr
ARBOR DAY 5K
Arbetoreum, Md

Sat 16 Apr
CAPE FUN RUN 5k
Arnold, Md

Sun 24 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS

Sat 6 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL 
HALF MARATHON & 10K w/RACEWALK

 
The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out
KIRG

What have you LEARNED FROM RUNNING
RonandBeau
   
There has been the usual discussions about running resolutions.  It is an easy flow for runners to tie their running goals for the year with New Year's resolutions.  I have picked up some observations over the years of making, breaking, and achieving goals/resolutions.
First; be realistic.  Resolving to run a 3 hour marathon if you have never ran a marathon or broken 4 hours, is not out of the question - eventually; but not very realistic for the shorter term.
Second; if you have a grand goal, break it into smaller peices.
Third; make a plan, with a timeline
Fourth; share your goal AND the plan.  You could be surprised to find someone else willing and ready to make the trip with you.
Next; share what you have learned from your running.  Here are some quotes from other runner's responding to that question.  I think you will see yourself, or someone you know, in the words - they could be coming from any one of you.
LET ME KNOW WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED FROM RUNNING?
  
"Running has taught me that I am in control... not those that are against me. Now, watch me collect my medals!"
 
"Today when I was running with my kids I was impressed with how far and how fast my daughter was running. After we finished our run I turned to her and said, "Nice job, Kenzie. That's your best run yet!" She turned to me and smiled. "You know why, Mommy? I kept telling myself while we ran, "I am not a quitter" over and over again." Apparently, running can even teach 5-year-olds important lessons about life!"
 
"Running has really taught me how important it is to keep yourself active. It requires a lot of self-motivation and determination. Running has taught me, that no matter how crazy your schedule is, that even a 5k a few times a week can really be beneficial to your health."
 
"Running is its own pain and reward. Practice can be very demanding but success, even a moderate one, can be very uplifting. I've had some of the most personally inspiring moments of my life from my running and as a direct result of my efforts. This year and last year have been very good for me this way."
 
"Running has taught me that I can do more than I have ever imagined. That many of my 'I could never do's' have turned into 'done dids'."
 
"Running has taught me that I feel better when I'm running. My last race, a 15K, fairly tough, trail race, taught me that I want to be running like the 73 year old lady who came in just behind me when I'm in my 70's."
 
"Running taught me that I'm impatient. it's taught me that running won't make you forget about someone. that breathing is important. and that positivity about it can infect others and encourage them to start running."
 
FATIGUE IS VOLUNTARY.
   
 DIFFERENT RACES, DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT EVERYTHING.
 
  Fatigue is voluntary.
 
  You are an 'experiment of one' 



How to Cope if You Can't Run for a Week or Two During the Holidays

During the holiday season, reasons to take a break from your normal running routine pop up all over the place. From mandatory holiday parties that go late into the night filled with alcohol, sweet treats and greasy foods to days packed with travel where the only chance you have to exercise is walking from your car to a rest area on the side of the highway or sprinting through an airport to make a connecting flight, it's a busy time of year.
These are the realities that most runners face during the chaotic holiday season. As a result, there is no doubt that many of us will have to make some tough decisions when it comes to our training schedules.
But don't start researching how to make bib transfers in an upcoming race just yet. In fact, everything you've worked for up until now won't be completely lost if you have to miss a few weeks of training. According to Adam Lesser, a Road Runners Club of America certified coach, if you have a lifetime of aerobic development to pull from, there's no need to panic.
Lesser says if you aren't able to fit in a workout for a week, you should treat it as a "lost week" and resume training the following week at the same level you would have as if you didn't take any time off.
"Within 5 to 7 days you'll lose some fitness," Lesser says. "But not so much that it would force you to alter your schedule."
That's good news if you're only forced to take one week off. But that's not always the case for if you get bogged down by travel plans or infinite social requests. One week may turn into two weeks and before you know it, you have no idea where to begin training again. In this case, Lesser recommends adding a "transition" week to get back to previous training levels.
"Jumping right back into previous training levels can overstress your system," Lesser says. "This leaves you with the all-too-familiar case of the 'toos'-too hard, too much, too soon. Instead, take a few weeks to steadily progress back."
Lesser says the first week back, you should complete easier runs at your previous frequency, incorporating strides at the end of some of those runs. In the second week, you should start adding in a little more quality by including a tempo or interval workout. Lesser warns runners to be careful, though, when it comes to pace.
"As always, gradual progressions back from periods of inactivity require patience and consistency," Lesser says. "Keep the pace moderate, not on the faster end at first. After that transition period, you will be safe to resume training, assuming your body is responding well to the return to running."
Of course, the other option is to forgo a "transition period" and avoid losing any of the hard work you've already put in the books. Besides, that extra glass of eggnog and batch of cookies you devoured in one sitting will taste much better after a good work out anyway.




 

2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE

HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 As the days continue to be dark early and start to get colder - and wetter; our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up in early 2016, like DISNEY; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

Registration is NOW open for the  St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k -and-
10K ACROSS the BAY

                           
PRICES ARE GOING UP!
 
Prices are going up for the 2016 Across the Bay 10k and the 
2016 St. Michaels Running Festival.
 
CLICK HERE to register for the Bridge Race before prices go up on January 2nd
 
CLICK HERE to register for the St. Michaels half marathon or 5k before prices go up January 4th
 
CURRENT PRICE
INCREASED PRICE
DATE OF INCREASE
Bay Bridge Run Entry
$60
$65
January 2nd
St. Michaels
5k
$40
$45
January 4th
St. Michaels
Half Marathon
$80
$90
January 4th
 

CLICK HERE to register

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



FALL/WINTER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS

 Week #209, 9 JANUARY 2016
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

"You are never too old to set a new GOAL or dream a new DREAM "
C.S. Lewis
TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 

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NOTE:  THANKS to Derek Ammons for his  donation to the Truman Port A Pot

It is always hard to include everyone in an email or even a text, when setting up a "run date".  The Kent Island Running Group has found an phone app that makes contacting a number of individuals easy.  It's call "WHATSAPP" and can be found on the App Store for your phone.  All that is needed is to opt in with your cell phone number.   I am using it with KIRG and Debi, Angela, and I have used it to set up some runs at Rosaryville.  Check it out - and if you are interested, let me know and we can add you to the "Running Group".

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The long winter days are not a time to double-down on your training, nor is it time to let your hidden 'couch-potato' self emerge.  I have laid out a plan for 'maintenance training' in our THIS WEEK'S TRAINING SCHEDULE below
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Some of us have been looking for alternative locations for keeping our HILL REPEATS going over the winter.  The NAVAL ACADEMY BRIDGE may be a good choice.  What do you think?  Maybe meet at the Jonas Green parking lot on the east side, do a few repeats up -> down, then coffee?
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 
WHAT -NOT- TO DO AFTER YOUR MARATHON
  
You just ran 26.2 miles, and sweet victory has washed over you. 
Maybe you beat your old PR or maybe you had to walk a few times. At this point you really could care less. 
You did it. You're alive. Where are the bagels?
But remember, your body has just undergone tremendous physical stress and, according to Dr. John Gallucci, a physical therapist and the medical coordinator for Major League Soccer, no amount of recovery carbs, deep tissue work or cool-down stretching can immediately undo it. In fact, most of these things will land you in even more trouble.
"The bottom line is you just ran a marathon," Gallucci says. "You're going to have muscle soreness. Right away, runners want to do things to decrease muscle soreness, but many of the actions they take actually lengthen the recovery process."
For the most efficient recovery, here are five things you want to avoid after crossing the finish line.

Don't Get a Post-Race Massage
Let's get the biggest heartbreaker out of the way first: You shouldn't get that complimentary deep-tissue massage offered at the end of the race. According to Gallucci, your muscles are completely broken down at this point and are actually bleeding. The last thing you want is to have someone working their hands into them, increasing blood flow to the area.
Instead, wait one to three days and stay away from deep-tissue work at first. Massages with light strokes are ideal. Also consider getting warmed up beforehand with heating pads or a bath. The same thing applies with cool-down stretching: It's best to wait until the next day when your muscles aren't as inflamed, then ease into it slowly.

Don't Go Out For a Victory Meal
Finishing a marathon is one of those bucket list life events that gives you free reign to eat whatever you want in massive quantities. Hey, you deserve it.
But even if you're feeling pretty good after your marathon (and ready to reward yourself for your hard work), your body will not be capable of breaking down a large amount of food and will be forced to expel it in one way or another (sorry for the visual). 
Stick to small snacks for the rest of the day, which will allow your body to digest everything it needs and use those nutrients to start you down the road to recovery. The good news? Scheduling your victory meal a few days later checks out with the doc. Whew!

Don't Do the Dramatic Finish Line Moment
Gallucci once had a patient come in after a race with a serious injury-but not from running. The runner's wife was so excited to congratulate her husband for accomplishing his goal that she ran right up to him and gave him a huge hug after he crossed the finish line. Unfortunately, this runner, like most, was extremely fatigued and hadn't quite caught his breath or balance. He collapsed on the pavement and shattered his kneecap. 
Lesson learned: Save the dramatics for a time when you're a little less clumsy. 

Don't Ignore Your Immune System 
When marathoners cross the finish line and start evaluating the damage, they're likely thinking about their muscles and joints. Chances are they aren't thinking about their immune system. But Gallucci points out that the old-fashioned immune system is actually one of the hardest hit parts of your body post-marathon. You are much more susceptible to illness after running for 26.2 miles.
Make it a point to get in a little extra fruit for the next few days, specifically any rich in Vitamin C, like oranges and grapefruit.

Don't Get Right Back To It
Many runners believe that a light jog a few days after finishing a marathon is a great way to keep the muscles loose and warm. Gallucci disagrees. 
"Take at least two to three weeks to recover before running again," he says. "Then start light jogging. Use that time to evaluate possibly injuries, like any strains or tendonitis." 
Trying to run again too quickly-even if it's just a light jog-often leads to a soft tissue strain because the muscle hasn't healed yet. Be patient and save yourself an even longer recovery period.

  

PORT  A   POT  Donation
We need your donation.

 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

I can now accept credit card donations; with secure, receipt verification.

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003