IN THIS ISSUE
WHY DO WE SLOW DOWN WITH AGE?
HOW TO COPE IF YOU CAN'T RUN FOR A WEEK OF TWO
HAVE THAT EXTRA CUP OF COFFEE
2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE
YOU KNOW YOU ARE A TRAIL RUNNER IF.....
RUNNER'S HIGH - NOT DUE TO ENDORPHINS
ST MICHAELS RUNNING FESTIVAL
Routes and Photos
UP COMING EVENTS
   


2016
SCHEDULE
COMING
SOON



Why do we slow down with age?  What we can do about it.
RonandBeau
Two crucial factors affecting speed decline in the older runner are reduced stride length and an increase in the time the foot stays in contact with the ground. Hill sprints can off-set these negatives.

Here's how: Let's consider the action of the foot and ankle on foot strike and how this contributes to pushing the sprinter forward at maximum velocity. Running up a slight slope will emphasis a greater toe-up foot position (this is known as dorsiflexion) on foot strike. The runner can consciously work on holding their toes up when sprinting up the hill (and on the flat). This 'cocking' action will trigger a greater propulsive reaction on the part of the calf muscles on push-off into each stride. This can enhance stride length and reduce contact time when the sprinter does workouts on the level. To further explain: many runners (particularly of master age -"more mature" runners) will have been encouraged to run 'on their toes'. This is actually contrary to contemporary sprint training wisdom, as a high position on foot strike will invariably result in the sprinter's heel collapsing toward the track, losing vital milliseconds and more importantly propulsive power. With the foot up the ankle cannot collapse and more power will go to where it is needed - toward propelling the athlete forwards down the track.

Do: 4 x 60m runs at 90% effort concentrating on your foot strike and leg pull-through (see following). Use a hill with a slight gradient. Too steep an incline will negatively affect the dynamics of the sprint action.   Training tip:
Calf muscle and ankle strength and power are crucial for runners - irrespective of age - but these areas are often overlooked in training in favour of the quadriceps and glutes (thigh and butt) by coaches and athletes alike.
  1. Maximize sprint technique

    As noted above, perhaps the major nemesis of the master sprinter is a decline in stride length. This is particularly manifest in the action of the free leg as it leaves the running surface and its foot travels up beneath and behind the body to an in front of the body position in preparation for the next foot strike and stride. An older runners 'return/recovery phase' (as it is technically known) is much less dynamic than that of their younger counterparts and their heel may not get very close to their butt at all during their return/recovery phase.

    To optimize speed transference into the next running stride, the master runners lower leg needs to 'fold up' under their body toward their butt and be pulled through quickly and powerfully as a short lever. This relies on hip flexor strength in particular. Hill sprints can again assume an important function in speeding up the master runners return/recovery phase. The hill will create the need for an additional leg drive which by reaction can increase the speed of the free leg as it comes up and through to the next stride. Specific sprint drills are also important:
    1. Running emphasizing the return phase
      Set-up: cones placed at 40 and 60m on a running track
      How to perform: the sprinter builds up speed to the 40m mark and then sprints at near maximum speed for a further 20m while emphasising pulling their heel toward their butt and a dynamic pull-through on each stride
      Do: 4 to 6 runs with a full recovery between efforts
       
Leg cycling

Set-up: use a fence or wall for balance
How to perform: place your hand closest to the wall against it or on a barrier for support. Lift up onto the toes of your inside foot. Keep your chest elevated and look straight ahead. Cycle your leg in a running action under your hips. As with the previous drill concentrate on pulling the heel up high toward your butt, and pulling the leg through dynamically to a position forward of your hips. You then 'sweep' it back, down and round to complete the cycle. Speed should gradually be increased as exercise confidence develops.

Do: 3 x 20 reps with 1 minute's recovery between sets


FATIGUE IS VOLUNTARY.
   
 DIFFERENT RACES, DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT EVERYTHING.
 
  Fatigue is voluntary.
 
  You are an 'experiment of one' 
   
How to Cope if You Can't Run for a Week or Two During the Holidays

During the holiday season, reasons to take a break from your normal running routine pop up all over the place. From mandatory holiday parties that go late into the night filled with alcohol, sweet treats and greasy foods to days packed with travel where the only chance you have to exercise is walking from your car to a rest area on the side of the highway or sprinting through an airport to make a connecting flight, it's a busy time of year.
These are the realities that most runners face during the chaotic holiday season. As a result, there is no doubt that many of us will have to make some tough decisions when it comes to our training schedules.
But don't start researching how to make bib transfers in an upcoming race just yet. In fact, everything you've worked for up until now won't be completely lost if you have to miss a few weeks of training. According to Adam Lesser, a Road Runners Club of America certified coach, if you have a lifetime of aerobic development to pull from, there's no need to panic.
Lesser says if you aren't able to fit in a workout for a week, you should treat it as a "lost week" and resume training the following week at the same level you would have as if you didn't take any time off.
"Within 5 to 7 days you'll lose some fitness," Lesser says. "But not so much that it would force you to alter your schedule."
That's good news if you're only forced to take one week off. But that's not always the case for if you get bogged down by travel plans or infinite social requests. One week may turn into two weeks and before you know it, you have no idea where to begin training again. In this case, Lesser recommends adding a "transition" week to get back to previous training levels.
"Jumping right back into previous training levels can overstress your system," Lesser says. "This leaves you with the all-too-familiar case of the 'toos'-too hard, too much, too soon. Instead, take a few weeks to steadily progress back."
Lesser says the first week back, you should complete easier runs at your previous frequency, incorporating strides at the end of some of those runs. In the second week, you should start adding in a little more quality by including a tempo or interval workout. Lesser warns runners to be careful, though, when it comes to pace.
"As always, gradual progressions back from periods of inactivity require patience and consistency," Lesser says. "Keep the pace moderate, not on the faster end at first. After that transition period, you will be safe to resume training, assuming your body is responding well to the return to running."
Of course, the other option is to forgo a "transition period" and avoid losing any of the hard work you've already put in the books. Besides, that extra glass of eggnog and batch of cookies you devoured in one sitting will taste much better after a good work out anyway.




 
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FALL/WINTER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
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Kent Island Running CLUB
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Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
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Anne Arundel County STRIDERS

 Week #208, 2 JANUARY 2016
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25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

Vary your training, your running partners, and your environment. Only your imagination limits the ways you spice up your running routine.   
TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM 

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As we start planning our 2016 running goals we should take a moment to think back on 2015.  The low points as well as the high points, the new friends and running partners we met - and those who are now getting their miles in "on the other side".  
  I would like to take this opportunity to THANK EACH OF YOU, whether we were able to run together or if we put in hundreds of miles in each other's company.  If it is true that each of us are a some of all our experiences - then each of you are a part of me, and I am a part of you.  You are a part of my 'family' - weird uncles' and eccentric aunt's.
  I look forward to continuing to log miles, renewing old running partnerships, new adventures and "war stories" in 2016.

It is always hard to include everyone in an email or even a text, when setting up a "run date".  The Kent Island Running Group has found an phone app that makes contacting a number of individuals easy.  It's call "WHATSAPP" and can be found on the App Store for your phone.  All that is needed is to opt in with your cell phone number.   I am using it with KIRG and Debi, Angela, and I have used it to set up some runs at Rosaryville.  Check it out - and if you are interested, let me know and we can add you to the "Running Group".

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The long winter days are not a time to double-down on your training, nor is it time to let your hidden 'couch-potato' self emerge.  I have laid out a plan for 'maintenance training' in our THIS WEEK'S TRAINING SCHEDULE below
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Some of us have been looking for alternative locations for keeping our HILL REPEATS going over the winter.  The NAVAL ACADEMY BRIDGE may be a good choice.  What do you think?  Maybe meet at the Jonas Green parking lot on the east side, do a few repeats up -> down, then coffee?
LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED.
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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.
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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes: 
 Click here for:  
 
EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 
MORE ON  HAVING THAT EXTRA CUP OF COFFEE
  
A review of nine previous studies found that participants averaged a 24 percent boost in physical endurance after drinking several cups of coffee.

 
 

2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE

HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 As the days continue to be dark early and start to get colder - and wetter; our HILL and aTRACK sessions will take on a more maintenance focus.  Unless you have a GOAL Race coming up in early 2016, like DISNEY; it is important to continue doing a high intensity workout (HILL and/or TRACK) once a week.  It will make you faster for next years races.

Alternate 4 to 6 x 800 YASSO's  with 10 TRUMAN PAPA BEAR type HILL REPEATS - be sure to do these safely with plenty of light.

 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

Like keeping up with high intensity workouts, it is important to keep up with the long runs once a week.  Like track and hills will make you faster - keeping up the Long Slow runs will make you stronger.  You do not need to log 20 mile runs every week.  10 mile runs, with a bump to 15 miles every three weeks.  This will keep your BASE Building going and put you at a higher fitness level when you start the next Phase of Periodization Training.


 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

YOU KNOW YOU ARE A TRAIL RUNNER IF:  .....


This video was put together by a group of trail runners - obviously with a videocamera and lot of time.  VERY FUNNY
RUNNER'S HIGH - NOT DUE TO ENDORFINS
 According to a new study, a runner's high may be caused by a self-produced chemical which has similar impacts on the body as cannabis. 

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Registration is NOW open for the 5th Annual St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k!

                           
Registration is NOW open for the 5th Annual St. Michael's Running Festival Half Marathon and 5k! 
 
The event  provides the regions best opportunity for a new PR while you take in gorgeous waterfront views, the quaint downtown shops and a ridiculously flat course! Don't forget to stay after the run for live music and your complimentary drink. 
                                               
CLICK HERE to register

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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