IN THIS ISSUE
REASONS TO RUN SLOW
TRAINING SCHEDULE
2015 BRIDGE RUN UPDATE
IS STRETCHING FOR RUNNERS PASSE' ?
TIPS FOR IMPROVING FOCUS
Routes and Photos

UP COMING EVENTS

   



18 July
HEMOPHELIA FDN 5K
Quiet Waters

19 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS
Upper Marlboro

8 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL
HALF MARATHON & 10K
Truman Pkwy

29 Aug
CRUMPTON VFD 5K
Crumpton, Md

12 Sept
FARMING FOR HUNGER
Prince Frederick

12 Sept
FEED ANNAPOLIS
Navy-Marine Stadium

13 Sept
GRAND PEOPLE CHASE
Adamstown, MD

19 Sept
Women's Wellness 5k
Millersville, MD

20 Sept
KTS Memorial 5k
Kent Island

26 Sept
Glen Burnie Improvement Assoc 5k
Glen Burnie, MD

26 Sept
VINEYARD DASH 5K
Lanyard, MD

26 Sept
RIDGEWAY E.S. 5K
Millersville , MD

27 Sept
ANNAPOLIS RUN 4 SHELTER
Quiet Waters

3 Oct
PASS IT FORWARD 5K
Millerville, MD

3 Oct
AUX VOLUNTEER FD 5K/10K
Crofton, MD



PORT  A   POT  Donation
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 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

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REASONS TO RUN 
S-L-O-W
  
RonandBeau

 

Running is hard. If you're targeting a goal-whether it's entering your first race or qualifying for Boston-you spend a lot of time pushing your limits. So when it comes time to run easy, you happily succumb to your inner plodder, right? Nope. "Not running slow enough on easy days is probably the number-one error runners make," says Greg McMillan, M.S., an exercise physiologist and running coach in Flagstaff, Arizona.

 

Consciously or not, many runners push too hard on easy runs and miss out on their varied benefits-like time to heal, for one. Demanding workouts like speedwork and long runs put a great deal of stress on muscles, and "any time there's a stress, you have to allow some recovery time for those tissues to rebuild," McMillan says. Time spent going easy also builds your fitness base and staves off burnout. "Easy runs allow you to focus on enjoying the run and your surroundings," says Michael Sachs, Ph.D., a sports psychologist at Temple University.


More: 5 Phases to Speed Up Your Running Recovery Follow these simple rules to properly chill out before your next big workout.

Rule #1: Run Slow Often

It's easy: Seventy percent of your weekly mileage should be easy miles. Depending on your age and fitness level, your muscles need 30 to 60 hours to recover from a hard effort, says McMillan. (Long, slow runs lasting 1.5 to 2.5 times longer than your average weekday run count as hard efforts due to their duration.) Running super slow and relaxed for one to three days after tough workouts gets blood flowing to muscles, which flushes away broken-down proteins, delivers new proteins to rebuild damaged tissue, and carries carbohydrates to replenish depleted stores in muscle cells. "That gentle exercise bathes muscles in the good stuff they need and removes all the bad stuff caused by the prior training," McMillan says. "And running as part of your recovery makes your body say, 'Oh, I'm still getting this stress-I better build this tissue even stronger.'"

 

Rule #2: Heed Your Watch-or Listen to Your Body It's easy: If you're notoriously bad at going slow enough, plug your easy-run pace into your watch and abide by the beep-at least until you firmly establish how slow should feel. If you're training for a 5K, aim for a pace just over two minutes slower than goal race pace; if your target event is a marathon, run about one to two minutes slower. But it is possible to run without an eye (or ear) on the time.

 

"For me, it comes down to the perception of the run being easy," says McMillan.

 

"Could I go farther or faster with no problem?" Running based on feel rather than time allows for variations in weather, wind, and terrain. 

 

"The body doesn't know pace, it only knows intensity and duration," McMillan says. "Tuning in to that is really important."

 
Rule #3: Stick With It

It's easy: For those who get bored or frustrated with lumbering along, you might wonder why you can't just skip easy runs and do something else-like rest or cross-train. It's simple, really. "The more you run, the better you'll be," says McMillan. "That's why most runners run as much as they can." Easy runs build your fitness base. They condition your musculoskeletal system to adapt to stress, which allows your body to handle greater mileage, and they help your cardiovascular and respiratory systems become more efficient. "You grow more of the capillary beds that deliver oxygen," says McMillan, "and stimulate more of the mitochondria that produce energy within muscle cells." 

 

So if you're serious about improving as a runner, run consistently-unless you're injury-prone, says Mike Hamberger, M.A., a coach in Washington, D.C. For the often injured, he says, "recovery jogs can become stressful workouts, not because they're doing the wrong pace, but because every time they run they're causing excessive stress on the body." Such runners should mimic running on easy days, through aqua-jogging or running-specific strength training.

 

The excuse: Running slow is so boring!

 

The solution: Engage your brain. Listen to music, a podcast or audio book, or make a point of noticing new details along old routes.

 


The excuse: Someone might see me puttering along!
The solution: Get over it. "You're running for yourself, not for other people," Sachs says. If you still can't bear it, change your route.

The excuse: Must. Pass. Them.
The solution: Overcome your competitive drive by hitting the treadmill. Or focus on running your own pace no matter what-good practice for race day

 

 

  Fatigue is voluntary.

 

  You are an 'experiment of one' 

   

2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE

HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 This Tuesday is speed work at AHS Track - 7 x 800 YASSO's; depending on heat index. Same as Intervals - .  KEEP THEM CONSISTENT. 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

2nd    -16 MILES - 70% Effort. 

"Time on your feet"

This week is a small increase in effort but I want you to pick up the pace the last two miles before the 2 MILE STOP, then use the last 2 miles (and 'the three bears) to recovery at a moderate jog. 

 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

2015 BRIDGE RUN

REGISTRATION BLOCK #3 - OPENS MAY 2ND!

 

Our Registration Process - Decoded! 

 

If we have managed to confuse you with our registration process - we are sorry!  Given the demand of the event, we are using a "block" registration process again this year.  Full details about pricing, registration dates and other details are located on our website.  Upcoming registration events are as follows  

  1. If you signed up for our wait list for online registration, you should have received your first email with instructions on Wednesday of this week. Please make sure you check your spam folder if you don't see the email with instructions and make sure you read the instructions carefully.  WAIT LIST REGISTRATION OPENS SATURDAY @ 8AM
  2. If you did not receive an email this week with early registration instructions, you are not on the wait list.  
  3. If you are not on the Wait List, General Registration opens at 12pm EST. To register on Saturday, CLICK HERE

Registration is expected to sell out quickly so set a reminder to register as soon as your category opens!  

 

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS

 Week #185, 18 July 2015
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 

"We walk away from our dreams, afraid we may fail, or worse, afraid we may succeed" - William Forrester

 

 

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM
 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

   
THANKS to DEREK AMMONS for his donation to the Port A Pot. Derek has been the most consistent donor for a long time.
 

  

 NOTE:
 We have 8 months of Port-A-Pot covered. 

We had another good group 8 for a Rosaryville tune-up one and two loop run last Friday 
   The 'depletion run' the next day, Saturday, was TOUGH 
Note that I did NOT call it a 'recovery run', which is a misnomer that can actually get you in trouble.  The body only knows duration and level of effort.  There is no 'flushing of lactic acid' with a run after a previous long or hard run.  The body just does not work that way. Any run is going to cause some degree of micro damage, which can accumulate while the runner 'thinks' he is recovering - result - you guessed it - injury; which a scratching of the head and "...but I was doing my recovery runs easy"
  There is a place for 'back-to-back' run of hard/easy or even easy/hard, long or short.  They give the body, and mind, a great incite of what lays ahead - running with a tired, depleted body (NOT just legs).  They should be planned with the same precision as your speed/track workouts, hill repeats, or LSD (Long Slow Distance) runs. 
Tomorrow, Tuesday, will be AHS Track Repeats -6:30pm .  GIT 'ER DONE !!

I will be doing Rosaryville possibly Wednesday, more likely Friday to mark the course for Sunday's run.  Let me know if you want to join me - even if you plan to run Sunday.
   We still need about 5 more volunteers to fill our the Aid Stations - a GREAT way to get in a loop or two and help 'newbies' reach their goal.

  Remember; ALL volunteers will receive a FREE entry to one ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS or BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM & 10K. 
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NOTE:  Tuesday Track Session tonight.at 6:30pm we will do AHS Track session.  Come out and join us.
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REMINDER that registration is open for  

ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS (10k, 10M, 25K, 50k), and  
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM and 10k.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED - GET AN DISCOUNTED ENTRY TO A FUTURE RACE. 

 

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    Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

 

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

IS STRETCHING FOR RUNNING PASSE' ?

Years ago, performing a battery of static, reach-and-hold type stretches before a run was not only in fashion but was considered by many to be essential for injury prevention.

More recently, runners have abandoned static stretching in favor of dynamic stretching, where the joints are slowly moved through their full ranges of motion in a series of exercises that mimic the separate motions of running. But some recent research now calls into question the efficacy of all stretching, regardless of type, for distance runners.

 

Can Stretching Prevent Injuries?

The primary reason why any athlete stretches before exercise is to decrease the risk of injury; but two recent, very thorough reviews found no evidence that stretching reduces injuries among runners.

A 2011 Cochrane review looked at six stretching trials involving 5,130 runners, while a 2013 Scandinavian paper published in the journal Sports Medicine culled data from four trials involving 4,812 participants across a range of sports, including runners. Both reviews found that while individual study results were somewhat inconclusive, the aggregate of the data was strong enough to conclude that stretching immediately before activity is not effective for reducing the incidence of injury.

 

The Scandinavian paper did find that a dynamic warm-up was effective for reducing injuries in about half the studies reviewed, but none of those studies involved runners. There is also other supporting evidence that shows that a dynamic, sport-specific warm-up can reduce injuries in sports involving speed, power and agility, so if you are a short distance runner or sprinter, don't skip the warm-up. These findings do not seem to apply to distance runners, though, because their injuries largely tend to be caused by overtraining and are seldom the result of the acute trauma that a warm-up or dynamic stretching can help prevent

 

Stretching Makes You Run Slower

If stretching before a run provides no injury prevention benefit, what about performance? Up to a certain point, a longer muscle is a more powerful muscle, so it stands to reason that stretching to lengthen the muscles prior to a run might improve performance. Here again, recent research has found just the opposite to be true.


Writing for the American College of Sports Medicine in a 2014 paper titled, "The Effects of Stretching On Performance," researchers found that performing either static or PNF (assisted, "contract-relax") stretching immediately prior to exercise led to worse performance for both distance runners and sprinters. Dynamic stretching fared better, actually improving performance among speed and power athletes, but there is no conclusive evidence to date about whether it helps or hinders endurance sport performance.

 

Why Stretch at All, Then?

Since stretching immediately before a run hampers performance and doesn't prevent injury, it would seem there's no good reason to ever stretch. But what this new evidence ignores are the very positive benefits of a regular, long-term stretching program. Indeed, research has found a long-term, regular stretching regimen can improve performance, and there are other benefits to consider as well.

 

In its most recent position paper on exercise guidance, the American College of Sports Medicine states that flexibility training is essential for maintaining or improving joint flexibility and range of motion, and this becomes increasingly important as we age. In order to stay limber and agile, the ACSM recommends stretching at least two or three times per week. And it doesn't seem to matter which type of stretching you prefer--the research indicates that you can get nearly the same benefit from static, PNF or dynamic stretching.

 

Because your muscles must be thoroughly warmed up prior to any type of stretching, the perfect time to incorporate your flexibility training is immediately following your easy runs. For static or PNF stretching, hold each stretch at the point of tension--but not pain--between 10 and 30 seconds. Relax and repeat up to three times.

 

For dynamic stretching, the ACSM advises that you incorporate slow movements that involve "a gradual transition from one body position to another, and a progressive increase in reach and range of motion as the movement is repeated several times."  

 

TIPS FOR IMPROVING FOCUS

 

Laser-like focus is a hallmark of champions in sport, and a strong mental focus in the late stages of a race gives a competitor a winning edge. Mental focus, like fitness, can be trained. Here are five tips to train your attention and improve your focus:

 

1. Use self-talk.

The internal monologue set in motion during races has a powerful influence on performance. A recent study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise showed that positive self-talk increased time to exhaustion. The signals our bodies use to determine when we've had enough are complicated-they are not just governed by our muscles but also determined subjectively by our brains. Pick a mantra such as "feeling good" or "smooth and strong," and repeat it at regular intervals during a workout or competition to help tap into that last bit of energy needed for a PR.

 

2.Do five more.

 Athletes must build mental circuitry much the way they lift weights in the gym to get strong. Work through frustration, build mental stamina and stretch your limits by asking yourself to do "five more." This can be five more minutes of concentrated effort at the end of hard workout, five more reps, five more math problems, or five more minutes on a challenging task. The goal is to train your attention and enhance your power of concentration.

3. Open Awareness
Another kind of focus achieved through meditation is referred to as open awareness. The brain circuitry for managing attention and open awareness is the same circuitry we use for managing distressing emotions. Bringing your mind back to a state of open awareness as other thoughts intrude trains your brain to ignore negative cues and setbacks that can occur while racing. Start with five minutes of meditation a day and build from there.

4. Fuel right.

Sugar and caffeine in regular doses keep the brain fueled and able to focus. In fact, caffeine may be the only legal and effective performance-enhancing supplement in endurance sports. Caffeine acts a stimulant, resulting in feelings of alertness and pleasure. It also decreases the brain's perception of physical exhaustion. Make sure that while stretching your limits of mental focus you keep the brain sharp and properly fueled.


5. Embrace the fight.

The best competitors love the fight as much as they love the finish. Focus on how tough you are when faced with a challenge. Visualize how you will handle any setback and embrace the opportunity to fight the good fight, knowing that the difficult stretches make the accomplishment all the more satisfying.


ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/maps

 

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003