IN THIS ISSUE
IMPROVE YOUR POSTURE, IMPROVE PERFORMANCE
2015 BRIDGE RUN UPDATE
Routes and Photos
TIPS FOR IMPROVING FOCUS
EXERCISES TO IMPROVE POSTURE
TRAINING SCHEDULE

UP COMING EVENTS

   



18 July
HEMOPHELIA FDN 5K
Quiet Waters

19 July
ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K
TRAIL RUNS
Upper Marlboro

8 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL
HALF MARATHON & 10K
Truman Pkwy

29 Aug
CRUMPTON VFD 5K
Crumpton, Md

12 Sept
FARMING FOR HUNGER
Prince Frederick

12 Sept
FEED ANNAPOLIS
Navy-Marine Stadium

13 Sept
GRAND PEOPLE CHASE
Adamstown, MD

19 Sept
Women's Wellness 5k
Millersville, MD

20 Sept
KTS Memorial 5k
Kent Island

26 Sept
Glen Burnie Improvement Assoc 5k
Glen Burnie, MD

26 Sept
VINEYARD DASH 5K
Lanyard, MD

26 Sept
RIDGEWAY E.S. 5K
Millersville , MD

27 Sept
ANNAPOLIS RUN 4 SHELTER
Quiet Waters

3 Oct
PASS IT FORWARD 5K
Millerville, MD

3 Oct
AUX VOLUNTEER FD 5K/10K
Crofton, MD



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 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

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IMPROVE YOUR POSTURE
AND
IMPROVE YOUR PERFORMANCE
  
RonandBeau

 

Sit up straight!" "Don't hunch!"At some point or another, we've all been berated to keep good posture. Whether it's curling up in front of the TV or hunching over a desk, we spend a lot of time sitting and it's easy to let things, well, slip.

But posture is about more than just looking proper. "Good posture is the foundation for efficient running form," says Elinor Fish, a mindful-running coach and owner of Run Wild Retreats in Carbondale, Colorado. "If our posture is chronically out of alignment, whether sitting, standing, walking or running, then we're at risk for developing muscular weaknesses or imbalances that can lead to poor running form. "

For example, she says, too much sitting can lead to weakened gluteus muscles, forcing other muscle groups, like the quadriceps, to compensate. That can cause common injuries like knee pain, iliotibial band syndrome, hip-flexor pain and lower-back pain. Carolyn Parker, a certified trainer and the owner of the Ripple Effect gym in Carbondale, adds Achilles and calf pain and hamstring injury to the list.

"Poor posture correlates with an overall weakness in the body's kinetic chain," says Parker. "It causes a collapsed chest, which inhibits breathing. It also shortens our stride, because the larger muscles of our lower limbs take over for the ineffective postural muscles of the torso."

 

How it works

Posture is a whole-body affair, involving everything from our feet to our core. Though "core" is often taken to indicate the abdominal muscles, it in fact refers to all of the muscles that stabilize our torso, including the glutes and muscles in the lower back, upper back, chest and shoulders. The core is responsible for maintaining pelvic stability, and is thus at the heart of proper (or improper) body position. The pelvis, meanwhile, acts as a supportive base for the upper body, and is the key to properly transferring weight through the lower body to the knees, ankles and feet.

Spending just a few minutes a day focusing on certain typically weak muscles in the upper and lower back, shoulders, chest and hips can prevent injury and make for a more efficient and powerful stride.

 

How to maintain proper running posture

 

1. Keep an expansive upper body. One of the most common injuries from poor posture is called upper cross syndrome. The lower trapezius in the back and deep cervical flexors in the neck weaken, while the upper trapezius muscles and the chest's pectoral muscles tighten, drawing the shoulders forward and down.

How does this relate to running? Simply, it makes it hard to breath. Explains Fish, "Any forward flexion in the torso increases the chance of getting a cramp, because the diaphragm is pinched."

When running, practice rolling the shoulders back and down and standing tall. Keep your shoulders relaxed. Ultimately, they should dangle from the torso, but it may take some time to develop the strength to hold them back. Until then, make it a conscious effort. The Cuban Press exercise (see below) will help strengthen the upper back and draw the shoulders back into a normal position.

 

2. Lift legs from the core. 

The biggest legs are not necessarily the fastest. In running, speed comes from efficiency, and efficiency starts with engaging the core. According to Fish, that means the gluteus maximus and gluteus minimus, the body's strongest running muscles.

To activate the glutes during a run, Fish recommends tilting the pelvis backwards. "When your belly is tipped forward, your abs are not engaged, your back is swayed and you're in a less powerful position," she says. "It's actually more mechanical work to lift your leg."

When the pelvis is tilted back, though, the abs engage and less mechanical effort is needed to lift the leg. Fish likens it to throwing a baseball: try to throw using only your arm, and the ball won't go very far. Engage your trunk, and the ball will travel much farther.

 

3. Work with gravity, not against it. 

Stand up straight, with your body in proper alignment, and flex forward at the ankles. When you are about to fall on your face, step forward to catch yourself.

The motion should be reflexive. Running is simply falling and catching yourself, over and over again. The ankles should be flexed, the hips slightly forward and the glutes engaged. That way, gravity works for you, making the gait cycle more fluid and less strenuous. Note, though, that this forward-fall sort of gait will only be possible with shorter strides, and may take some adjustment.

 

  

 

  Fatigue is voluntary.

 

  You are an 'experiment of one' 

   

2015 BRIDGE RUN

REGISTRATION BLOCK #3 - OPENS MAY 2ND!

 

Our Registration Process - Decoded! 

 

If we have managed to confuse you with our registration process - we are sorry!  Given the demand of the event, we are using a "block" registration process again this year.  Full details about pricing, registration dates and other details are located on our website.  Upcoming registration events are as follows  

  1. If you signed up for our wait list for online registration, you should have received your first email with instructions on Wednesday of this week. Please make sure you check your spam folder if you don't see the email with instructions and make sure you read the instructions carefully.  WAIT LIST REGISTRATION OPENS SATURDAY @ 8AM
  2. If you did not receive an email this week with early registration instructions, you are not on the wait list.  
  3. If you are not on the Wait List, General Registration opens at 12pm EST. To register on Saturday, CLICK HERE

Registration is expected to sell out quickly so set a reminder to register as soon as your category opens!  

 

 

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES - 

http://www.runningahead.com/groups/truman/m

aps

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
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SPRING/SUMMER Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel County STRIDERS

 Week #184, 11 July 2015
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 

"Deeds will not be less valiant because they are unpraised"  Aragon

 

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM
 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

   
THANKS to Leslie kriewald for her donation to the Port A Pot
 

  

 NOTE:
 We have 8 months of Port-A-Pot covered. 

We had a group of 8 for a Rosaryville tune-up one or two loop run last Friday - enough to get used to the 'conga line' at the beginning of any trail run.
   The 'depletion run' the next day, Saturday, was TOUGH - fatigued but everything was symmetrical.  It was a good opportunity to identify those 'nics and dings' that are a nuisance now but could turn into something worse if not attended to.  BE FORWARNED.
  Tomorrow, Tuesday, will be Hill Repeats -6:30pm at Truman Parkway. UGH!

  Remember; ALL volunteers will receive a FREE entry to one ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS or BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM & 10K. 
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NOTE:  Tuesday Track Session tonight.at 6:30pm we will do AHS Track session.  Come out and join us.
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REMINDER that registration is open for  

ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS (10k, 10M, 25K, 50k), and  
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM and 10k.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED - GET AN DISCOUNTED ENTRY TO A FUTURE RACE. 

 

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    Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

 

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

TIPS FOR IMPROVING FOCUS

 

Laser-like focus is a hallmark of champions in sport, and a strong mental focus in the late stages of a race gives a competitor a winning edge. Mental focus, like fitness, can be trained. Here are five tips to train your attention and improve your focus:

 

1. Use self-talk.

The internal monologue set in motion during races has a powerful influence on performance. A recent study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise showed that positive self-talk increased time to exhaustion. The signals our bodies use to determine when we've had enough are complicated-they are not just governed by our muscles but also determined subjectively by our brains. Pick a mantra such as "feeling good" or "smooth and strong," and repeat it at regular intervals during a workout or competition to help tap into that last bit of energy needed for a PR.

 

2.Do five more.

 Athletes must build mental circuitry much the way they lift weights in the gym to get strong. Work through frustration, build mental stamina and stretch your limits by asking yourself to do "five more." This can be five more minutes of concentrated effort at the end of hard workout, five more reps, five more math problems, or five more minutes on a challenging task. The goal is to train your attention and enhance your power of concentration.

3. Open Awareness
Another kind of focus achieved through meditation is referred to as open awareness. The brain circuitry for managing attention and open awareness is the same circuitry we use for managing distressing emotions. Bringing your mind back to a state of open awareness as other thoughts intrude trains your brain to ignore negative cues and setbacks that can occur while racing. Start with five minutes of meditation a day and build from there.

4. Fuel right.

Sugar and caffeine in regular doses keep the brain fueled and able to focus. In fact, caffeine may be the only legal and effective performance-enhancing supplement in endurance sports. Caffeine acts a stimulant, resulting in feelings of alertness and pleasure. It also decreases the brain's perception of physical exhaustion. Make sure that while stretching your limits of mental focus you keep the brain sharp and properly fueled.


5. Embrace the fight.

The best competitors love the fight as much as they love the finish. Focus on how tough you are when faced with a challenge. Visualize how you will handle any setback and embrace the opportunity to fight the good fight, knowing that the difficult stretches make the accomplishment all the more satisfying.


FOUR EXERCISES TO IMPROVE POSTURE

 

 

1. Shoulder Opener and Scapular Stabilizer

What: Chest, shoulders

How: Take a five-foot piece of PVC pipe or similar object. Start with an awareness of how you are standing: gently lift your toes and rock your weight back, activating your quads, glutes and abdominals. Then, gripping the pipe close to the ends, lift it to chest height. Straighten your arms, pushing the pipe away from your chest. Pinch your shoulder blades and lift your chest. Now lift the pipe above your head, keeping your arms straight, and then lower the pipe until it touches the lower back, changing your grip as needed. Then reverse the movement, bringing the pipe back above your head and to chest height. Repeat two to three sets of eight to ten reps.

 

2. Cuban Press.

What: Upper back

How: Stand straight, with arms at your side. Pinch an imaginary pencil between your shoulder blades. Keeping your shoulder blades pinched, draw your arms up until your biceps are in line with your shoulders, with the elbow hinged and hands dangling towards the floor (your side, biceps and forearms should form three sides of a square). Rotate your forearms, so that your hands are pointing toward the ceiling (your biceps should still be in line with your shoulder). Slowly press your palms towards the ceiling, continuing until your shoulders start to lose their grip on the imaginary pencil. Then reverse, bringing your arms back down to your side, pinching your shoulder blades the entire time. Start with two sets of five reps. Perform each rep slowly. Don't use weights.

 

3. Reverse Wall Squat

What: Core, hips

How: Stand facing a wall, with your nose, knees and toes as close to the wall as possible. Your feet should be hip or shoulder length apart, your shoulder blades pinched, your chest thrust out and chin tucked slightly.

Spread your arms to either side for stability, and then slowly squat. Your nose, toes and knees should touch the wall the whole time. Squat until your quads are parallel to the ground, then come back up. Start with three sets of five reps. Don't use weights until you can get your quads parallel to the floor without falling over.

 

4. Plank

What: Core

How: Fish calls the plank the best all-around exercise for runners. Start with three sets of 10 seconds each. While holding the plank, keep your entire core clenched. What's important is not necessarily how long you hold it, but how intensely you activate your back, abs and hips. Allow several minutes to fully recovery between each set

 

 

2015 TRAINING SCHEDULE

HERE 

  

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:30pm   

 This Tuesday is a  TRUMAN PAPA/MOMMA BEAR HILL REPEATS SESSION 10; depending on heat index. Same as Intervals - .  KEEP THEM CONSISTENT. 

Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

 

    -16 MILES - 70% Effort. 

"Time on your feet"

This week is a small increase in effort but I want you to pick up the pace the last two miles before the 2 MILE STOP, then use the last 2 miles (and 'the three bears) to recovery at a moderate jog. 

 Remember to Record time, distance, HR, how you felt, humidity, temp for comparison later.

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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