IN THIS ISSUE
DO ENDURANCE ALTHLETES HAVE A HIGHER PAIN TOLERANCE
WORKOUTS
Routes and Photos
HOW TO BUILD YOUR PAIN THRESHOLD
IS YOUR PERSONALITY CAUSING YOUR INJURIES?

UP COMING EVENTS

   


22 March
WIPEOUT CANCER 5K
Piney Orchard, Md
DETAILS/REGISTER

28 March
GREAT GOOSE CHASE 5K
Chestertown, MD

28 March
BOWIE SPRING 5K
Bowie Md

4 April
ANNAPOLIS YOUTH 5K
Navy Marine Stadium

11 April
ARBOR DAY 5K
Ridgely, MD

11 April
CBT 5K for the BAY
Quiet Waters
Details/Register

12 April
Kent Island Full Metric Marathon (16.3miles) and Half-Metric Marathon (8.15 miles)
Stevensville, Kent Island
18 April
HERITAGE FDN 5k
Severn, MD
19 April
Americas Vetdogs 5k/10k,
Stevensville, Kent Island
Details/Register

19 April
HOWARD CNTY CONSERVANCY 5K
Elkridge, MD

25 April
CAPE FUN RUN 5k
Cape St Claire, MD     

26 April
MILES for MELANOMA 5K
Kent Island H.S.

2 May
RUN 4 THE BAY 5K
Chesapeake Beach, MD

3 May
SPCA 5K
Quiet Waters

9 May
CONNORS SMILE 5K, 10M
Kent Island

16 May
METAvivor ADVENTURE RACE
Hillsmere, Annapolis, Md



KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
DETAILS/REGISTER here


DO ENDURANCE ATHLETES HAVE A HIGHER PAIN TOLERANCE?              
RonandBeau

 

Why?" is a common question endurance athletes get from others about our sport. From an outsider's perspective, the challenges of training and racing appear to be rooted in misery and hurt. They think we must be crazy to do what we do.

Interestingly, it turns out that the reason others fail to understand our motivations may be rooted in the fact that endurance athletes experience pain and discomfort differently. Indeed, recent research suggests that endurance athletes have a higher pain threshold than the Average Joe.

 

In the study, published in the Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain, researchers recruited a group of endurance athletes and a group of non-athletes. Upon putting them through a battery of tests to measure things like pain tolerance, pain threshold and fear of pain, they found that the endurance athletes reported pain as less intense. They were also able to tolerate it for a longer period of time than their non-athlete counterparts.


Based on this study, we are left to wonder whether those who become endurance athletes are inherently more tolerant when it comes to pain or if it is the sport itself that bolsters pain threshold.

 

Another recent study out of Australia offers some insight. In testing a group of participants' pain tolerance before and after a six-week long aerobic training regimen, researchers found that those who took part in the exercise protocol showed significant increases in pain tolerance at the end of the month-and-a-half long study. This suggests that even relatively small amounts of exercise can bump up our threshold for pain.

Mike Jotautas, a triathlon coach in Louisville, Kentucky, regularly sees this phenomenon play out with the athletes he coaches. "I really think pain tolerance is something that is developed through training," he says. "Being an age group coach, you watch people who come from very little athletic experience and they go through this progression of experiencing pain and breaking through and learning their limits."

 

Indeed, whether you're a newbie or a pro, you must learn to embrace pain in order to participate in triathlon at any level. Even on the days when the weather is ideal, your equipment functions perfectly, and you're in top shape, the sport involves a certain amount of discomfort that must be endured over the long haul. If you wanted to avoid those types of experiences, you'd choose another hobby.

 

 


  Fatigue is voluntary. 

 

  You are an 'experiment of one' 

   

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:00pm   

  
   Maintaining track, or any speed work, after you have completed your goal race - and over the winter; is extremely tough.  It is also probably the single most important thing you can do to improve - endurance or speed. Make an effort to MAKE A PLAN and GET SOMEONE TO PARTNER WITH.

Keep it simple.  4x 800's mixed with 3 x 1 Mile repeats every couple of weeks.  Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

for another couple of weeks then back to 7am  

 

 When you are ready to get back on the roads for some longer runs - don't overdo it.  10 Miles is a good maintenance distance.  Once a month or so, throw in a 16 Mile run - just to avoid getting in rut.


 

Always Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  

  

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

  

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.

 
OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



Fall/Winter Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel STRIDERS

 Week #168, 14 MARCH 2015
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 "Anyone can give up. It's the easiest thing to do in the world. But to hold it together, to keep going, when everyone around you would understand if you quit. THAT is strength."   

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM
 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

  
 NOTE:
 We have 8 months of Port-A-Pot covered.

 

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  WELCOME to the Anne Arundel STRIDERS.  This is a growing and active group of runners doing group runs and races primarily in the Piney Orchard/Waugh Chapel area.  Spearheaded by Jennifer Ralston and Chris Williams, the group will put on the WIPEOUT CANCER 5k on 22 March in Piney Orchard - See Details to left.
   I look forward to sharing their comments, questions, photos, and anecdotes :-)
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Can spring be far off when the trails turn from snow and ice to mud?  I think not.  The temps were even starting to moderate,!  The postponement of SENECA 50k, curtailment of GW BIRTHDAY Marathon, and HASAWAHA 50k were anomalies.  HAT 50k is in two weeks.  Hopefully there will be opportunity for training runs at Rosaryville, Patapsco and AHS Trails soon but for now are ALL about the mud - but the temps were good :-)

  Except for a brief cold front later in the week, the weekend looks to nice - maybe shorts and long sleeves.

 

  REMINDER that registration is open for the METAvivor Adventure Race (kayak, bike, run); Annapolis Tri Club's TRI FOR THE ENVIRONMENT (1/2 mile SWIM, 10 Mile Bike, 5k Trail Run), ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS (10k, 10M, 25K, 50k), and BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM and 10k.

 


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    Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

 

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

   
How to Build Your Pain Threshold With Strategic Training  

 

Developing a higher pain threshold comes through strategic and varied training. Put simply, some workouts are going to stress you physically and mentally more than others. It is important to utilize these workouts in order to prepare yourself for the challenges of race day-but not to go overboard, which can lead to burnout.

More: 3 Tips to Avoid Triathlon Training Burnout 

Jotautas says there are two main types of workouts that can help build an athlete's pain tolerance. "First, you have workouts where you're training at a high intensity, like interval training, where you have a higher output for short repeats," he explains. "Then there are the long endurance workouts where you're out there for hours on end experiencing things like sitting on a bike saddle in a certain position for a long period of time, which can involve a lot of discomfort."

More: When to Push Past the Pain in Triathlon Training 

It is through these types of sessions that you not only realize your physical limits, but you also train your brain to allow your body to push harder. Jotautas often sees this in action when he does performance testing with new triathletes.

"When we have them on a bike or treadmill and ask them to push to their maximum, they don't have a frame of reference, so they will sometimes finish and feel like they could have gone harder," he says. "But when they come back to retest, they miraculously are able to summon up more strength and push harder because they know that pain threshold."

Overcoming non-injury related pain and discomfort in workouts and races is a skill that is developed over time. "It's all about learning your physical limits, and your mind has a lot of control in terms of how much you can push yourself," he adds. "If you can control that, you will be able to tolerate higher levels of intensity."

More: Push Your Anaerobic Threshold With PPTs 

Additionally, experience also offers the knowledge of what comes after a hard workout session or big race. That deep sense of satisfaction that many triathletes feel after pushing their bodies to the maximum is enough to get most to come back time and again. Knowing that you had the drive and discipline to keep moving forward even when it wasn't easy has a way of boosting the ego and making an athlete feel as though all that pain was well worth the effort.

 

 

 

Is Your Personality Causing Your Injuries?

 


If you keep getting injured, your personality might be to blame.

Researchers have discovered that personality type and injuries are linked. That means that even if you avoid overtraining, diligently warm up before every run and cross-train regularly, your personality could be the biggest, and possibly most overlooked, threat.

The prognosis isn't all bad. Evidence suggests you might have more control of your personality than previously thought, giving runners at risk for injury the chance to change course.


In a landmark study published in Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine in 2013, researchers found that novice runners who tested higher for Type-A personality traits were at a lower risk of sustaining a running injury than their Type-B counterparts.

Using the well-established Type-A Self-Rating Inventory (TASRI) test, the team of scientists at Aarhus University in Denmark divided people into two groups: those who exhibited a competitive, impatient and hyperactive personality (Type-A) and those who possessed a more relaxed, laid-back personality (Type-B). The Type-Bs were about 12 percent more likely to report that an injury had reduced their training volume for one week or more.

This finding was significant because it contradicted a 1990 study that found that competitive Type-A people were more prone to injury because they tended to ignore early warning signs and pushed through pain.

 

Luckily, Personalities Can Change

For you Type-B runners who are cursing your luck, don't go hanging up your shoes just yet. Other research suggests personality type can be changed. Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, wrote an in-depth review of nearly 20 studies that shows that personality is highly susceptible to our belief systems. Deck's synopsis: if you believe that your personality can change, it likely will.

 

The good news is that we can pick and choose which personality characteristics we'd like to work on, and leave the less desirable ones out. This is important because, while the Type-A personality was shown in the Denmark study to be associated with fewer musculoskeletal injuries, it has long been associated with higher risk of heart disease. A 2010 study conducted at the University of Murcia in Spain found that high levels of stress-a characteristic of the Type-A personality-was associated with a higher injury rate among professional athletes.

If we could pick and choose among personality traits that would minimize the risk of injury, the list might look something like this:

 

Desirable: Self-confidence, competitiveness, ambitiousness, autonomy

Undesirable: Impatience/time urgency, anxiety, hostility

 

Those who identify more with Type-B personality can use traditional goal-setting techniques to improve self-confidence and autonomy and to add some competitiveness to their running. Those who fall into the Type-A camp can reduce their risk by practicing stress-reduction techniques and learning to be more patient.

 

In either case, it's important to listen to your body.  

 

A 2009 study published in the journal Pain Practice showed that ultra-marathon runners felt pain at the same level as non-runners, but they tolerated much higher levels of pain for much longer. While this kind of mental toughness can be great for pushing your running to new levels, if taken too far, it can lead to a more serious injury. Follow smart training protocols and don't be afraid to take time off if necessary. There will always be another race to run.

 


 

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Ron

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