IN THIS ISSUE
INSPIRATION COMES IN MANY FORMS
Routes and Photos
GETTING HIGH FOR ULTRA'S
RULE #10
WORKOUTS

UP COMING EVENTS

   

9 March
GET PUMPED FOR PETS 5k
Chester, MD
DETAILS/REGISTER

22 March
WIPEOUT CANCER 5K
Piney Orchard, Md
DETAILS/REGISTER

28 March
GREAT GOOSE CHASE 5K
Chestertown, MD

28 March
BOWIE SPRING 5K
Bowie Md

11 April
ARBOR DAY 5K
Ridgely, MD

11 April
CBT 5K for the BAY
Quiet Waters
Details/Register

12 April
Kent Island Full Metric Marathon (16.3miles) and Half-Metric Marathon (8.15 miles)
Stevensville, Kent Island
18 April
HERITAGE FDN 5k
Severn, MD
19 April
Americas Vetdogs 5k/10k,
Stevensville, Kent Island
Details/Register

19 April
HOWARD CNTY CONSERVANCY 5K
Elkridge, MD

25 April
CAPE FUN RUN 5k
Cape St Claire, MD     

26 April
MILES for MELANOMA 5K
Kent Island H.S.

2 May
RUN 4 THE BAY 5K
Chesapeake Beach, MD

3 May
SPCA 5K
Quiet Waters

9 May
CONNORS SMILE 5K, 10M
Kent Island

16 May
METAvivor ADVENTURE RACE
Hillsmere, Annapolis, Md



KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
DETAILS/REGISTER here


INSPIRATION COMES IN MANY FORMS AT UNEXPECTED TIMES             
RonandBeau
 

Dean Karnazes posted this article in ULTRARUNNER Magazine that touched me at a deep, deep level.  I have talked to all (most) of you about it at one time or another over the years - not always not as eloquently as those below     

The word inspiration has almost become cliché these days. It's so overused the true meaning has been diluted and cheapened. Yet there's no denying that the words others say to us can have the power to, well, inspire.

I'll never forget the World 24-Hour Championships in Seoul, Korea. The conditions were dreadful, hot and humid with appalling air quality. There were too few toilets on the course and many of the runners were becoming sick. The stench was overpowering.

By the 10-hour mark the U.S. team was falling apart, as was nearly every other team. Many of the runners audibly groaned as they stammered along, the medic tents increasingly filling with each lap.

I was approaching one of these medic tents when I noticed a fellow teammate, Roy Pirrung, sitting on the ground with one of his shoes off. Roy is a guy I greatly admire and perhaps the toughest motherf*er I've ever met (can I say that in UltraRunning magazine?). As I grew nearer, I saw what appeared to be a freshly lanced marble-sized blister on his toe that was oozing puss and blood. As I ran past him, face ashen and grimacing with agony, Roy looked up at me, too much of a gentleman to say the words aloud, and silently mouthed, "I love this sh*t!" Whenever I'm facing a rough patch, I reflect back on that stirring lip-sync.

 

Here are other words that have inspired some of our fellow endurance athletes:

 

Mike Arnstein "Stu Gleman is the founder of the Ancient Oaks 100, a small hardcore old school 100 with no frills. It's the kind of event where you just show up and see what you're made of, or not made of. It was my first 100-miler and I slept on his living room floor the day before the race. It was tough going and I DNF'd at mile 78. I was devastated. The next day he said to me, 'Mike, if you train really hard and believe in yourself, you could make history in the sport one day.'"

Mike's since gone on to finish more than 50 ultras, run a sub-2:30 marathon, finished eight Ironman races, broke 13 hours at the 100-mile distance and made the Top 10 alltime list in North America. 'Nough said.

 

Lisa Henson "It's not always easy being married to John Medinger, accomplished ultrarunner, Western States board member and former publisher of UltraRunning magazine. It's especially not easy when you're dragging during an ultra and John's crewing for you. At the 22-mile mark of a particularly brutal 50- miler I was flagging. Then I saw John and I was certain he was going to offer words of encouragement and empathy. Instead, he said, 'Can't you run any faster?'

I was so mad that I crushed the next 28 miles, setting a new 50-mile PR in the process. Sometimes the craziest things really inspire you to your best performance."

 

David Krupski "'It's on you.' Simple, empowering and completely direct. If you want to accomplish something, change something, whatever it is you want to do, it's on you-and you alone-to do everything necessary to reach your goal.

 

I'm drawn to ultrarunning because it's probably the 'fairest' sport out there. It's all about preparation/training... the harder we train, the better we do. I love the fact there are no "magic pills" in ultrarunning. It's all on you."

 

Rob Krar "I was driving across the vast desert on the way to Western States, listening to a podcast of Katie Lee, an Arizonian folk artist, writer and environmentalist. I'd been doing a lot of reflecting during the drive about the torrent of events that had transpired this past year, how my performance would be at States, and where the future would lead me. Katie started to speak about her love for the Colorado River and Glen Canyon before the dam was constructed. She concluded with, '... and, I mean, when a place talks back to you that's your place, and you'll know it right away.'

It was a defining moment for me and maybe hard to explain to others. I'd been trying to better understand what running means to me and why I do it. When I heard those words the hair on the back of my neck stood up. It was a revelation. It suddenly seemed so simple-I run to feel a connection to the earth and the peace it provides. When I run, the earth speaks back to me."

 

Michelle Barton "Last summer I was running the Sinister 7 100-miler and started unraveling at mile 82. By the 88-mile mark I could barely hold a decent jogging pace. There seemed no way I was going to make it; a DNF seemed inevitable. All hope was lost.

My running partner could sense my internal strife and discord. He assessed my condition and said, 'Michelle, I believe in you. His words were so sincere, so honest. He didn't say much, just that he believed in me. Heck, I thought, I'd done other 100-milers before. I'd finished Badwater. I knew what it took. Suddenly, I was infused with a renewed energy and vigor! I went on to finish the race in 29:20. Not my fastest, but at mile 88 I never thought I'd ever reach that finish line. What got me there was someone else believing in me when I had lost all belief in myself."

I hope these stories help to inspire a belief in yourself.

 


  Fatigue is voluntary. 

 

  You are an 'experiment of one' 

   

PORT  A   POT  Donation
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ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.

 
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Fall/Winter Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
***
Anne Arundel STRIDERS

 Week #166, 28 FEBRUARY 2015
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25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 'It's on you.' Simple, empowering and completely direct. If you want to accomplish something, -change something,-whatever it is you want to do, it's on you-and you alone-to do everything necessary to reach your goal."

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM
 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

  
 NOTE:
 We have 8 months of Port-A-Pot covered.

 

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  WELCOME to the Anne Arundel STRIDERS.  This is a growing and active group of runners doing group runs and races primarily in the Piney Orchard/Waugh Chapel area.  Spearheaded by Jennifer Ralston and Chris Williams, the group will put on the WIPEOUT CANCER 5k on 22 March in Piney Orchard - See Details to left.
   I look forward to sharing their comments, questions, photos, and anecdotes :-)
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Defense Hwy Eagles
 I can not remember as long a string of frigid running days as we have had this month.  However, I continue to hear about many of you still getting 'out there'.  Good for you - what does not freeze you solid, makes you stronger.  However, if you have opted for the treadmill or cross-training - good for you too.  The idea is to keep at it. Whatever it takes - just get 'er done.
   John Curley was one of the few who ventured down to St Mary's County for the FROZEN HEART 50k and reported the course was beautiful with about 30 bridges over streams but the temperatures and hard-packed snow trails turned it into a two loop (20 miles) run.  The race director said of the 165 signed up, 65 showed up and most opted for One or Two loops.  Jimmy Wilson did all three loops in just over 7 hrs - WELL DONE, Jimmy!!
   Lynn and I are heading to Sedona AZ for a reunion with my USNA Company Classmates - not JUST to get away from the cold.  I hope to do some trails 
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    Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

 

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

   
GETTING HIGH FOR ULTRA'S - AND I DON'T MEAN ALTITUDE
-or-
AND I THOUGHT I HAD HEARD IT ALL 

The grueling sport of ultramarathon has fostered a mingling of two seemingly opposite camps: endurance jocks and potheads.

"If you can find the right level, [marijuana] takes the stress out of running," says Avery Collins, a 22-year-old professional ultramarathoner. "And it's a postrace, post-run remedy."

The painkilling and nausea-reducing benefits of marijuana may make it especially tempting to ultramarathoners, who compete in races that can go far longer-and be much more withering-than the 26.2 miles of a marathon. Ultramarathon is one of the fastest-growing endurance sports; there were almost 1,300 races in the U.S. and Canada in 2014, up from 293 in 2004, according to UltraRunning Magazine.

Ultramarathons last anywhere from 30 to 200 miles, and typically crisscross mountainous terrain and rocky trails. Runners endure stomach cramps and intense pain in their muscles and joints. Competitors often quit after a sudden loss of motivation, matched with the boredom of running for upward of 24 hours straight.

"The person who is going to win an ultra is someone who can manage their pain, not puke and stay calm," said veteran runner Jenn Shelton. "Pot does all three of those things."

 

Shelton said she has trained with marijuana before, but she made a decision to never compete with the drug for ethical reasons, expressly because she believes it enhances performance.

The phenomenon isn't easily quantified, because even in Colorado, which legalized marijuana, ultra runners declined to go on the record with their marijuana use. But marijuana is a common topic on endurance-running blogs. Often debated is whether marijuana can improve performance, particularly because of its much-heralded capacity for blocking pain. The drug is now legal for medical use in 23 states plus the District of Columbia, and a sizable portion of legal medical users cite chronic pain as a reason.

 

"There's good science that suggests cannabinoids block the physical input of pain," said Dr. Lynn Webster, founder of the Lifetree Pain Clinic in Salt Lake City. Cancer patients have also used marijuana to treat nausea from chemotherapy. For distance runners, nausea can ruin a race, preventing them from ingesting needed calories and nutrients.


In a nod to the growing acceptance of marijuana as a recreational drug, the World Anti-Doping Agency in 2013 raised the allowable level of THC-the drug's active ingredient-to an amount that would trigger positive results only in athletes consuming marijuana in competition. That essentially gave the green light to marijuana usage during training, not to mention as a stress reliever the night before a race.

In competition, a WADA spokesman said that marijuana is banned for its perceived performance enhancement, and because its use violates the "spirit of sport."

USA Track & Field, which governs distance running in America, follows the WADA guideline. "Marijuana is on the banned list and should not be used by athletes at races," said Jill Geer, a representative with USATF. "We are unequivocal in that."

 

 

Rule #10 (of 10) to Stay Injury Free

Get Shoes That Fit

 

Running shoes have changed a lot over the years. They breathe better, are more likely to come in various widths, and are constructed from superior materials. Most important, there are far more shoes to choose from (racing, training, track, cross-country). There are even minimalist shoes designed to mimic barefoot running (although there's no scientific evidence that forgoing shoes decreases injury risk). This gives you more options. Of course, you still have to figure out which shoe will work best for you-not an easy task. "There's no single best shoe for every runner," says J. D. Denton, who has owned a Fleet Feet running store in Davis, California, for 14 years. Not only that, but it's impossible to say that shoe ABC will eliminate injury XYZ. Denton and his staff are careful to draw a line between giving medical advice and suggesting a top-notch shoe. "We're careful not to say, 'This shoe will cure your plantar fasciitis,'" Denton says. "Shoes aren't designed to cure injuries. Our goal is to make sure you get the shoe that fits and functions best on your feet."

 

Others are less cautious than Denton. They point out that while a given shoe isn't guaranteed to heal a given injury, the right shoe on the right runner can help. Verran says that he has been able to help patients overcome injuries by suggesting a better fit. "It happens all the time," Verran says. "It's a matter of finding the shoe that's right for a certain foot type."

 

ACTION PLAN

Don't expect shoes to correct an injury resulting from training error or muscular imbalance. However, when you need new shoes (replace them every 300 to 500 miles), go to a specialty store to get expert advice. As a general rule, buy less shoe rather than more shoe (unless you weigh 220 pounds or know you need the Monster Mash model). Studies show that shoes perform best when they fit best. Ask your shoe salesperson: "Why is this the best shoe for me?" If he or she can't provide a sound answer, find another store.

 

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:00pm   

  
   Maintaining track, or any speed work, after you have completed your goal race - and over the winter; is extremely tough.  It is also probably the single most important thing you can do to improve - endurance or speed. Make an effort to MAKE A PLAN and GET SOMEONE TO PARTNER WITH.

Keep it simple.  4x 800's mixed with 3 x 1 Mile repeats every couple of weeks.  Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

for another couple of weeks then back to 7am  

 

 When you are ready to get back on the roads for some longer runs - don't overdo it.  10 Miles is a good maintenance distance.  Once a month or so, throw in a 16 Mile run - just to avoid getting in rut.


 

Always Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  

  

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

  

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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