IN THIS ISSUE
RECOVERY RUNS - YES OR NO?
WORKOUTS
TEN RULES TO STAY INJURY FREE
Routes and Photos
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING SCHEDULE

UP COMING EVENTS

   

9 March
GET PUMPED FOR PETS 5k
Chester, MD
DETAILS/REGISTER

28 March
GREAT GOOSE CHASE 5K
Chestertown, MD

28 March
BOWIE SPRING 5K
Bowie Md

11 April
ARBOR DAY 5K
Ridgely, MD

11 April
CBT 5K for the BAY
Quiet Waters
Details/Register

12 April
Kent Island Full Metric Marathon (16.3miles) and Half-Metric Marathon (8.15 miles)
Stevensville, Kent Island
DETAILS/ REGISTER

18 April
HERITAGE FDN 5k
Severn, MD

19 April
Americas Vetdogs 5k/10k,
Stevensville, Kent Island
Details/Register

19 April
HOWARD CNTY CONSERVANCY 5K
Elkridge, MD

25 April
CAPE FUN RUN 5k
Cape St Claire, MD     

26 April
MILES for MELANOMA 5K
Kent Island H.S.

2 May
RUN 4 THE BAY 5K
Chesapeake Beach, MD

3 May
SPCA 5K
Quiet Waters

9 May
CONNORS SMILE 5K, 10M
Kent Island

16 May
METAvivor ADVENTURE RACE
Hillsmere, Annapolis, Md



KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
DETAILS/REGISTER here

CONGRATULATIONS to everyone who participated in the first KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES!!  The results from all participating races are being tabulated and will be announced soon.  STAY TUNED.

RECOVERY RUNS - YES or NO?                
RonandBeau

  

 One of the more popular justifications has been the idea that such runs help to clear excess lactic acid from your muscles. Since this idea has been disproved time and again (the fact is your body doesn't produce lactic acid, but clears it on its own within an hour after working out), there is little evidence that recovery runs promote muscle repair or any other healing-related benefits often attributed to these "easy" outings.

So if that's the case, why bother? Why not just take a rest day, or maybe cross-train? While there are programs that promote only focusing on a key few workouts per week and cross-training or resting on other days, most elite runners and most training plans for intermediate or advanced runners incorporate easy runs between the harder workouts. So what's the benefit? Why do such prescriptions exist in the absence of evidence supporting their use for the "usual" reasons?

 

Let's take a look at a motivation for continuing to use recovery runs in your training. So long as you keep them sufficiently short and easy, they can be a productive tool in your training kit. In fact, if you view them as providing some of the benefits below, you'll start thinking of them as "anticipation runs," helping you get ready not only for your next harder workout, but also to toe the starting line of your goal race as ready as possible.

 

Aerobic Development

The key determinant of performance at nearly any race distance above 400m is your aerobic strength. Any workout at nearly any effort or distance is going to help improve your aerobic fitness, and such improvements should be your number one priority. For beginners, the gains can be significant. For experienced runners, the gains may occur more at the margins-but the margins are eventually what matter the most.

Yes, you can achieve aerobic gains through cross-training. But the efficiency of such gains (benefits divided by the time spent) are much greater for running, and the principle of specificity applies, meaning the more time you spend on your primary activity, the better.

 

Running While Fatigued

Perhaps one of the most important racing skills you can develop (besides a sense of pacing) is the ability to run through late-race fatigue. Successfully doing so can make the difference between a pleasant race experience with a satisfactory result and a crash-and-burn. There are three skills that help with this capability, all of which can be developed through running on tired legs, which is usually the point of recovery runs:

  • Mental toughness. The act of getting out the door and putting one foot in front of the other-regardless of the pace-is a precursor to doing the same thing at a faster pace come race day. If you can't master the former, your confidence in the latter will suffer.
  • Recruiting alternate muscles. As your primary running muscles get fatigued through repetition, your body learns to make subtle adjustments in the "balance of strength" it applies to the running process. It thus taps into muscle fibers that may go neglected if you only run when you are completely fresh. If these muscles aren't developed ahead of race day, don't expect them to perform when you need them.
  • Maintaining good form: In spite of the need to recruit alternate muscles, it is still important to maintain good running form to keep your running economy (and therefore pace) high late in the race. Learning to do so can also help increase your injury resistance during tougher training runs, and the recovery run provides a more benign environment for doing so.
  • Calorie Burn
Given the importance of your weight in your race performance, every bit of calorie burn you can muster helps. Furthermore, the easy, low heart-rate pace at which you should be running your recovery outings helps (if only in a small way) teach the body to better utilize fat-an especially important attribute for marathon runners.

  

 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  

 

  Fatigue is voluntary.


  You are an 'experiment of one' 

   

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:00pm   

  
   Maintaining track, or any speed work, after you have completed your goal race - and over the winter; is extremely tough.  It is also probably the single most important thing you can do to improve - endurance or speed. Make an effort to MAKE A PLAN and GET SOMEONE TO PARTNER WITH.

Keep it simple.  4x 800's mixed with 3 x 1 Mile repeats every couple of weeks.  Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

for another couple of weeks then back to 7am  

 

 When you are ready to get back on the roads for some longer runs - don't overdo it.  10 Miles is a good maintenance distance.  Once a month or so, throw in a 16 Mile run - just to avoid getting in rut.


 

Always Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  

  

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

  

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



Fall/Winter Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
 Week #162, 31 JANUARY 2015
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

"The few who do are the envy of the many who only watch."

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM
 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

  
 NOTE:
 We have 8 months covered. 

 

  IF WE WANT TO CONTINUE HAVING THE PORT-A-POT, THERE WILL HAVE TO BE MORE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE GROUP. 
 
One months donation for 12 of our runners is not much to ask for the convenience we all enjoy.  Please do your part.
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We had a great Annual Membership Meeting for the Kent Island Running Group.  Trudy Humphries, Andy Lev, and the other Board members have done a great job forming an informative, close-knit group of runners - that now have their own programs and running 'family'. 
  EVERYONE is invited to submit questions, comments, anecdotes, photos, and race reports to share with ALL our group.
  I look forward to hearing from you.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------    This past Saturday's run ended up being a treadmill day.  It was cold but the one condition I treat VERY cautiously is when icey roads are called for.  I don't want any of you sliding into an accident on your way to Truman - nor do I like the idea of some bozo sliding into us on Rt 450. 
   This weekend is expected to be sunny but cold bracketed by cold, rainy/snowy days Friday and Sunday - so let's get er' done.  The following week brings the FROZEN HEART 50k, followed by Washington's BD Marathon, B&A Marathon or HAT 50k .
Defense Hwy Eagles
  
 

 

I  can't say it has been worse this winter so far but I have been feeling

especially  - how to say this scientifically? - 'blah'. The blizzard, and

 following deep freeze forced me to modify my winter maintenance training - less  cycling outside (and I now have ALL the cold weather gear!).   I was

 feeling  sorry for myself, feeling like my hard earned fitness was seeping away  like a leaky faucet, when someone confided in me that they were having trouble getting motivated to workout. Of course, I immediately went into 'coach mode' and relayed all the tips and mental techniques I have learned over the years, but all the 'tips' in the world don't make it easier. Winter doldrums have been the bane of runners for - ever, but since I always find it easier to find the 'glass half full',  there is an upside.

 

 Our biological make up naturally slows down during the winter. Kind of a primeval leftover of the hibernation syndrome.   Every Periodization schedule I have seen uses the winter months as the Maintenance or Base phase where intensity and volume are reduced significantly. So maybe

the blahs are our bodies way of countering those raging Type A urges to keep training like maniacs over the winter. ........whatever; they

still suck !  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

 

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

  

TEN Rules to Stay Injury Free

 
As I was putting this Update together, I came across an article by Amby Burfoot of Runner's World.  It is very timely and mirrors what you have (probably) grown tired of hearing me say.  I will follow up with the other 9 Rules in coming weeks - so you can focus on each one :-)
 

  

I. Know Your Limits


It's easy to get injured; anyone can do it. Just run too much. "I firmly believe that every runner has an injury threshold," says physical therapist and biomechanist Irene Davis, Ph.D., from the University of Delaware's Running Injury Clinic. "Your threshold could be at 10 miles a week, or 100, but once you exceed it, you get injured." Various studies have identified injury-thresholds at 11, 25, and 40 miles per week. Your threshold is waiting for you to discover it.

Of course, your goal is to avoid injury. Runner and

sports podiatrist Stephen Pribut, D.P.M., warns runners to beware the "terrible toos"-doing too much, too soon, too fast. Every research paper and every expert agrees that this-"training errors"-is the number one cause of self-inflicted running injuries. The body needs time to adapt from training changes and jumps in mileage or intensity. Muscles and joints need recovery time so they can recover and handle more training demands. If you rush that process, you could break down rather than build up.

Running experts have recognized this problem, and long ago devised an easy-to-use 10-percent rule: Build your weekly training mileage by no more than 10 percent per week. If you run 10 miles the first week, do just 11 miles the second week, 12 miles the third week, and so on.

Yet, there may be times when even a modest 10 percent increase proves too much. Biomechanist Reed Ferber, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the faculty of kinesiology and head of the Running Injury Clinic at the University of Calgary says that he sees a lot of newly injured runners during that third month of marathon training, when a popular 16-week Canadian program pushes the mileage hard. Meanwhile, his clinic's nine-month marathon program for first-timers increases mileage by just three percent per week. "We have a 97 percent success rate getting people through the entire program and to the marathon finish line," Ferber says.

ACTION PLAN
Be the Tortoise, not the Hare. Increase your weekly and monthly running totals gradually. Use the 10-percent rule as a general guideline, but realize that it might be too aggressive for you-especially if you are injury-prone. A five-percent or three-percent increase might be more appropriate. In addition to following a hard-day/easy-day approach, or more likely a hard/easy/easy pattern, many top runners use a system where they scale back their weekly mileage by 20 to 40 percent on a regular basis, maybe once a month. And remember that mileage isn't the only issue. Experts point out that an overly aggressive approach to hill running, intervals, trail running-indeed, any change in your training habits-can produce problems. Keeping a detailed training log can help you gauge your personal training threshold. Record your weekly mileage and how you feel after your runs. Look for patterns. For instance, you may notice that your knees ache only when you're logging more than 40 miles a week.

.Another major bugaboo: You used to run 30 miles a week, you got injured, now you want to get back to your old routine as quickly as possible. Don't. Take your time. The same applies to that upcoming race-if you missed some training time, don't accelerate the pace and distance of your remaining workouts in an effort to "catch up." Instead, adjust your goals as needed.   

 

I would add a caveat here that you should pay attention to your MENTAL limits as well as PHYSICAL limits.  It is possible to get psychologically exhausted BEFORE you reach your physical limits.  That could lead to a different kind of "injury", but no less hazardous to reaching your goals

 

 

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.

 
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING PROGRAM
If you are looking to do any long 
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distance run - Marathon, 50k, 50 Mile or even longer - YOU NEED A PLAN  Join others with the same goals - even targeting the same race.
2015 Edition coming soon.  Let me know if you are looking for a tailored training schedule.
 
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 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

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