IN THIS ISSUE
PMB - Post Marathon Blues
WORKOUTS
KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES
Routes and Photos
BRIDGE RUN 10K -IN THE BOOKS
AGING UP
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING SCHEDULE

UP COMING EVENTS

   



Sat 8 Nov
RUN$$WELL 5k
Denton, Md

Sat 15 Nov
Howard County Autism 5k
Centenial Lake, Md

Sat 22 Nov
SPAN TURKEY TROT 5k
Kinder Park

Wed 26 Nov
AACC TURKEY TROT
AACCollege

Thur 27 Nov
STRUT STUFF TURKEY TROT 5K
Prince Frederick, Md

Sat 6 Dec
REINDEER RUN 5k
Edgewater, Md


The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

DETAILS HERE

KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
dETAILS/REGISTER here
                           


PMB
(Post Marathon Blues) 
FOR OUR MCM and NYC
MARATHONERS 
                               
RonandBeau

  

  Some 43,000 runners hit the streets this past Sunday.  I know some of you were part of it.   By Monday, those runners started their recovery, not just physically but emotionally as well - it's only natural to feel a sense of letdown or emptiness after a long-awaited momentous event. Here's a tip, runners: what got you through training will also help carry you through the post-marathon blues - careful planning.  According to sports psychologists, trainers and professional runners, an episode of mild depression is fairly common in the aftermath of a major event, especially one that you've spent a considerable amount of time and energy planning for. I understand brides have postnuptial depression after their wedding day. - not that I would know; but according to sports psychologist Dr. Jack Lesyk, director of the Ohio Center for Sport Psychology:

Some of the disappointment of the post-event letdown can be alleviated by knowing that it's normal and to expect it. For months, your life has been organized around this singular goal. Now, suddenly it's over and the disciplined, intensive efforts are no longer required.

This is the time to pause, reflect and enjoy other aspects of life that may have been neglected during intensive training. Sleep late; spend more time with family and friends. Do things you wanted to do but sacrificed for your training. Plan ahead so that when the big event is over, you don't face a vacuum of too much time.

The key is avoiding too much empty downtime. Starting up a new project with new goals can help. Runner's World magazine suggests that making even simple plans after the marathon can be useful.

That plan doesn't have to culminate in another marathon, or even another race, but it should contain some meaningful goals, such as maintaining a specific weekly mileage or just making sure you run a certain number of days every week. Of course, it's important to be flexible with your goals to avoid injury. But after running a marathon, you're at a very high fitness level, and with the right training focus you can make the most of it.

Whatever you do, make sure you take the time to savor your major accomplishment. And give your body some time to heal.

 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  

 

 

 Fatigue is voluntary.


  You are an 'experiment of one' 

 

 

ULTRA RUNNER SURVEY
 
A friend from the VHTRC daughter is doing a survey of ultra runners for her class.  She is looking at the correlation of birth sequence to participation in ultra events.  Very interesting.  Please help her out.

PORT  A   POT  Donation
We need your donation.

 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

I can now accept credit card donations; with secure, receipt verification.

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track is back on 'track'.

 

-   START 6:00pm   

  
   Maintaining track, or any speed work, after you have completed your goal race - and over the winter; is extremely tough.  It is also probably the single most important thing you can do to improve - endurance or speed. Make an effort to MAKE A PLAN and GET SOMEONE TO PARTNER WITH.

Keep it simple.  4x 800's mixed with 3 x 1 Mile repeats every couple of weeks.  Be sure to work hard to stay consistent and steady. Always do 1 Mile EASY Cool Down. Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 7:00am 

for another couple of weeks then back to 7am  

 

 When you are ready to get back on the roads for some longer runs - don't overdo it.  10 Miles is a good maintenance distance.  Once a month or so, throw in a 16 Mile run - just to avoid getting in rut.


 

Always Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  

  

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 

  

Hope to see you at the track.     

  

  

KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

  

DON'T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR

KICS-KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

Did you run at the Get Pumped for Pets race March 9th? Are you doing Al's Run on March 29th? These are just TWO of the races included in the Kent Island Challenge Series!

The Kent Island Running Group (KIRG) is proud to introduce the brand new Kent Island Challenge Series (KICS) for 2014. Series consists of 8 local races. Compete with others to be eligible for end of year Age Group awards by completing any 6 of 8 races. Those completing all 8

races will be recognized as a KIRG IRON CRAB.   There is no cost to

participate in the Series but you must pre-register at: www.kirg.org.

(Full details available there as well.) If you join the KIRG, you can save $5 on registration to all of the series races!

 

Races included in the series:

x1.            Get Pumped for Pets 5K/10K - March 9th

x2.            Al's Run 5 miles - March 29th

x3.            Kent Island Full and Half Metric Marathon-        April 13th

x4.            Connor'sMiles 5K/10K/10M - May 10th

x5.            Rosaryville 10K/10M/25K/50K - July 20th

x6.            Ben Moore Memorial 10K and Half Marathon- August 9th

x7.            Run 4 Shelter 5K/10K and Half Marathon- September 13th

8.            Jingle Bell 5K/10K- December 13th

 

 

  
 
ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.

 
OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



Fall/Winter Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
 Week #151, 15 November 2014
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

"We runners talk about having fun but I don't think anybody believes us. We talk about discipline and endurance, we take care, we exercise caution, we watch our diets and monitor our pace. We are ascetics who talk, unconvincingly, of the bracing enjoyment of self-abuse."
 Peter Sagal

 

TRUMAN START TIME WILL BE 7:00AM

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

*********************************************************  

Welcome to Mark Hamilton to our group!


 

****************************************************************  

 THANKS to Rae Jean Goodman, Jaimie Brown, Tom Corby and Paula Lyons for their donation to the Port A Pot. We now have FIVE months covered. 
 

NOTE:

  IF WE WANT TO CONTINUE HAVING THE PORT-A-POT, THERE WILL HAVE TO BE MORE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE GROUP. 
 
One months donation for 12 of our runners is not much to ask for the convenience we all enjoy.  Please do your part.

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***ANNOUNCEMENT*******

Willie and Laura Gumula have offered to host our Annual Marathon Party.  It will be a potluck on Sunday 16 November at 4pm.  The address is 564 Pinedale DR Annapolis MD 21401; about the 1/2 mile point on Pinedale.

-----SPOUSES WELCOME-------

Please RSVP to me and Willie at willieandlaurag@yahoo.com

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CONGRATULATIONS to Jane Meyer on completing her FIRST Ultra at the Rosaryville 50k!

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NEW YORK MARATHON Race Report from Tom Corby:

 

"So sorry I'm late in communicating to you about the details of the race last Sunday. This was a very hectic week. Below is synopsis of race day. Everything went very well and I was happy with the outcome. The only thing that would've been better is if you were there too!

 

  The first step was for all of us to get to the Staten Island Ferry Terminal in lower Manhattan on race day morning. I took the subway, as did most runners, to get there. Can't do this if you're claustrophobic because the subway cars were packed like sardines. The Ferry Terminal was completely taken over by the race that morning. Before entering, all of our belongings were sniffed by German Shepherds for any kind of explosives. Each Ferry departed the terminal with 4,000 runners and was flanked on each side by Coast Guard gun boats for the whole ride to Staten Island. Arriving at Staten Island, we were herded onto waiting buses which you could only board if you had a race bib. After a 40 minute ride, we got to the Start Village. Immediately upon getting off the buses, every runner was electronically "wanded" by a cop. If carrying energy gels, which most of us were, we had to pull them out and show them to the cops so they could see them in their original packaging. Gels transferred to bottles or other containers were taken away. After all that, we were finally let in to the starting village. There were 10 - 12 helicopters hovering over the starting village the entire time we were in there. Cops everywhere.

 

  The winds were a steady 25mph with some gusts up to 40mph. Some of that was broken up by buildings along the route but it was full blast on all the bridge crossings and in the more open areas. The temps were in the low to mid 40's, but with the wind chill factor it never got out of the 30's. I was wearing a black thermal beanie with a billed hat on top. I had cinched up the billed hat as tight as I could get it but it still blew off in one of the gusts and flew in the air 20 yards behind me. I had no chance to retrieve it because instantly there were several hundred people between me and the hat. Even for the elite runners, this was the slowest NYC Marathon in 20 years because of the wind.

 

This was by far the most crowded race from start to finish I've been in. It was elbow to elbow for the whole 26 miles. Also, it was a hugely international. It was actually a rarity to hear English being spoken among runners during the race. There were two primary hazards throughout the route. Almost every runner wore some "throw away" clothes for the first few miles. As the clothes got thrown off to the side, the wind blew them right back onto the course and other runners would trip on them. The other hazard was spectators trying to cross the street. They almost always got hit by a runner. I even clipped a woman who walked right in front of me.

 

The race started on Staten Island and immediately went over the Verrazano bridge into Brooklyn. From there we went through Queens and then into the Bronx. Next was a short trip through Harlem, then into the heart of Manhattan and finally into Central Park for the finish. An awesome tour of New York. No real steep hills but a lot of long gradual up hills that seemed to never end. This was especially true for the 59th street bridge. The run through Central Park was beautiful and it was neat running to a finish line with grandstands full of people on either side. When I crossed the line it was announced there were still 20,000 runners behind us! After crossing the finish line was probably the worst part of the race. Once you stopped running, the wind blew the cold into you very quickly. They gave us all space blankets, but a number of runners began to get hypothermic within a few minutes. Thankfully they had an excellent medical staff including a lot of "spotters" whose sole job was to spot people beginning to look bad. Anyone looking suspiciously hypothermic was taken out of line and given extra blankets with the more severe cases being whisked off in a golf cart to the medical tent. Because of the extreme security in Central Park, we had to walk about 2 miles beyond the finish before we could exit the park. They did give us all a bag of recovery drinks and some food before this long walk and that helped. All in all it was a tremendous experience. There were cheering fans along the entire route and in some cases it seemed like they were 10 deep on each side.

 

Apart from the race, we had a great time in New York. Since we got there on Friday, Paula and I had one bit of bonus entertainment - we got to walk around Times Square on Halloween night and see some phenomenal costumes and freight makeup. Got lucky with the timing of that this year as well as the weather on Friday night. Now getting ready for the Bay Bridge race tomorrow. Looking forward to some rest and then getting back on the trails this winter. 

Tom

 

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      Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

  

BRIDGE RUN 10K - IN THE BOOKS

 

The ACROSS THE BRIDGE 10K on Sunday was the first time in eight years runners got to cross the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.  From all reports, it was a huge success and all the concerns were unfounded.  Getting 18,000 people to the START and back across the bridge from the FINISH was a herculean effort.  I was asked to coordinate the Wheelchair Division on behalf of the MARYLAND ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR PHYSICAL FITNESS, of which I am a member.  I also was tasked with certifying the course.
The certification involved coordinating with the MDTA to ride my bike across the bridge while it was closed for maintenance.  After the course was layed out, it took four months to find a time to certify it.  That opportunity came last Thursday - at 10pm.  So with a police escort and support vehicle, I  completed the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Trifecta - I have now RAN across it (during the early events), SWAM under it (with the BAY SWIM), and RIDEN across it.   I am the only person to ever have done that - A nice bit of trivia.
I  re-rode the course at 2am race morning - certification requires two measurements - and then spent time at the FINISH Timing Tent where I saw many of you finish.
What I would like to do is get those of you who did the race to send a Race Report and describe how the day went for you, expectations, and highlights of being 188 ft above the Bay.
LOOKING FORWARD TO HEARING YOUR REPORTS.

 
 

 

 


AGING UP - IT MAY NOT HELP

 Runners 50 years and older represent one of the fastest-growing age groups participating in the increasingly popular events. As the total number of runners finishing marathons in the U.S. doubled to 518,000 in the 20 years ended in 2011, the number of finishers age 50 and older nearly tripled to 92,200, or about 18% of the total, according to Running USA, an industry-funded research group

 

 

 

"Only those who test the distance will know how far they can go."  

 

 Fatigue is voluntary.

 
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING PROGRAM
If you are looking to do any long 
Ben Moore logo
distance run - Marathon, 50k, 50 Mile or even longer - YOU NEED A PLAN  Join others with the same goals - even targeting the same race.
 

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003