IN THIS ISSUE
FIVE QUESTIONS ON TRAIL RACE SELECTION
TRANS ROCKIES ENTRY
WORKOUTS
KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES
BRIDGE RUN 10K SIGN UP
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING SCHEDULE
MY NO '1' GOAL FOR EACH OF YOU
Routes and Photos

UP COMING EVENTS

   



Sat 31 May
Quarterfield E.S. 5k
B&A Trail

Sat 7 June
Beltsville E.S. 5k
Beltsville MD

Sat 7 June
ArcCCR 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 15 June
TRUXTON KIDS TRI
Truxton Park

Sun 22 June
ADJUST FIRST 5k, 10k
Kent Island

Sat 12 July
MD SWIM FOR LIFE
Chestertown, MD

19 July
HEMOPHELIA FDN 5k
Quiet Waters

Sun 20 July
ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS
10K, 10M, 25K, 50K
Details/Register HERE

Sat 9 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL
HALF MARATHON, 10K
Truman Parkway
DETAILS/REGISTER


The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

DETAILS HERE

KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
dETAILS/REGISTER here
                            

FIVE QUESTIONS ON TRAIL RACE SELECTION?
RonandBeau

 

A while back 'Michael Strzelecki asked me to address some questions he and other beginner and novice trail runners were asking.  He sends me the questions and posts the responses to the Facebook group Patapsco Trail Junkies.  Here is the first group of five.  Please pass on any observations, lessons learned you might have.

 

Group 1 (Race Selection and Training)

 

Q1 - What are some local races that you would recommend for someone who wants to try their first trail ultra?

 "Local" means something different to everyone. I usually think of 3 to 4 hours drive so I can get there for Packet Pick up, get situated in hotel, campsite and get familiar with the Start area.  MID MD/ROCKBURN 50k, ROSARYVILLE 10K,10M,25K,50K TRAIL RUNS, HAT 50K, VETERAN'S 50K (also Rosaryville), DC NORTH FACE 50k  are all well organized, low to moderate technical terrain run. There are other low key 'Fat Ass' (very low key) trail runs springing up in the area.

You want your first trail ultra to be a good experience - "you will never have another FIRST ultra" :-).  If you are not a good climber, look to one of the Rosaryville runs.  If you want a lot of company, pick HAT or NORTH FACE.  The best thing you can do for yourself is to do lay out your parameters - cost, closeness, other running partners going, and research the course and past results.

Full disclosure, I am the Race Director for ROSARYVILLE TRAIL RUNS and specifically designed it for first time trail runners (at any distance), novices, or those more experienced looking for 'time on feet' training for an upcoming Fall 'A' race; with experienced trail runners at the Aid Stations.

 

Q2 - How is training for and running a trail 50K different than training for and running a road marathon?   Really, it need not be that much different.  If you are at/near marathon trained level, you just need to do some "specific need" training.  If your race is hilly - focus on hills; if single track - do some long runs on single track; if a rough/rocky terrain - you get the idea.  The basic workouts should include two or three short weekly runs at slightly over expected race pace, at least one long run, and at least one core/strength workout.  Track workouts should be scaled back - no more "eyeballs and teeth" sprints.  A pace about 1 1/2 min faster than expected race pace with gradually increasing reps is adequate. ex: 4 x 800 at 10min/mile for a 50k/50M pace of 12 min/mile, increase one 800 each week and alternate with one mile repeats.

** The difficulty for most (less experienced) runners is determining the best pace for them; which will be greatly different than their marathon pace - and is ALWAYS slower than they initially think.  Occasionally working in back to back long(er) runs is an excellent way to get used to running on tired legs - and to acclimate to the discomfort you will inevitably feel.  It is hard to grasp 'slow and steady' but that should be the mantra for your first trail ultra.

 

Q3 - How important is strength training and core workouts in trail running?

In a word - Critical. Even beyond what is needed for road marathons because you are using more, different muscles, in different ways when navigating trails.  There is much more movement in more directions with each step.  We have all seen the runner slouched over to one side - classic weak core.  The stronger your core, the less strain your major muscles have to exert to keep you upright, and, therefore, the longer they can last.  The stronger your propriosensory (small, stabilizing) muscles, the less work your major muscles have to contribute to balance, leaving more/longer effort toward forward - relentless- forward motion.

 

Q4 - What local trails would you recommend for (1) someone who prefers non-technical trail running; and (2) someone who prefers their trails more hilly and rocky (say within an hour or 90 minutes of Baltimore)?  Our own Patapsco Trails offer the widest variety of trails in the area.  Most bordering on moderatly technical.  HAT trails at Susquehana State Park are also in the moderate level.  Rosaryville is low technical but good single track. Broad Creek Trails (behind Annapolis High School) are short but technical.  SAVAGE Creek Park (near Elkhorn lake) go from non-technical to moderatly technical.  Venture out to Catotcin and AT Trail for more technical trails.  If anyone has other locations - let us all know.

 

Q5 - How many 50Ks should someone run before trying their first 50-miler?

 The first ultra I ever did was JFK 50 and I don't think a previous 50k would have made much difference.  However, the North Face 50k before the North Face 50M would be beneficial.  The difference between a 50k and a 50M is like the difference between a half marathon and a full marathon.  There is just no way to fully simulate those late miles but to just do it.  At that point, it is more mental preparedness/toughness than physical strength.(I won't even touch on the difference between a 50M and a 100M - think logarythmic :-) ) If you can find a 50k with similar conditions, and terrain as your target 50M - and you have time - go for it.  No 50k's before is okay, one prior 50k is good but more than one is not necessarily better.  Too many, too soon, before the 50M can be detrimental - put you in an overtrained, under recovered condition.  NOT what you want going into your first 50M.  Doing a 50k as a 'training run' is doable but only if you give yourself adequate recovery time after - and 'adequate' is a very individual thing each of us has to determine for ourselves.  You are an 'experiment of one' :-)

 
ENTRY FOR TRANS ROCKIES 3 DAY RUN
A member of our group has an entry for the TRANS ROCKIES 3 DAY RUN August 12- 16.  Tim Acton has a knee injury that will prevent him from doing this terrific run which presents a terrific opportunity for someone.  Tim can be reached at: timacton1@yahoo.com
 

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track Session

-   START 6:00pm   
 

  
Repeat last week. Up to 1 Mile Warm Up, then 4 x 800 at 80%, 1 Mile Cool Down.
 Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 6:30am 

 

This will be technically your second 11 Mile run.  This week take the Chesterfield Loop again for some hill work. Concentrate on your hydration, nutrition, salt intake.  Let me know how it goes.

 

 Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  

 

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 

 

Hope to see you at the track.     

 

 

KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

  

DON'T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR

KICS-KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

Did you run at the Get Pumped for Pets race March 9th? Are you doing Al's Run on March 29th? These are just TWO of the races included in the Kent Island Challenge Series!

The Kent Island Running Group (KIRG) is proud to introduce the brand new Kent Island Challenge Series (KICS) for 2014. Series consists of 8 local races. Compete with others to be eligible for end of year Age Group awards by completing any 6 of 8 races. Those completing all 8

races will be recognized as a KIRG IRON CRAB.   There is no cost to

participate in the Series but you must pre-register at: www.kirg.org.

(Full details available there as well.) If you join the KIRG, you can save $5 on registration to all of the series races!

 

Races included in the series:

1.            Get Pumped for Pets 5K/10K - March 9th

2.            Al's Run 5 miles - March 29th

3.            Kent Island Full and Half Metric Marathon-        April 13th

4.            Connor'sMiles 5K/10K/10M - May 10th

5.            Rosaryville 10K/10M/25K/50K - July 20th

6.            Ben Moore Memorial 10K and Half Marathon- August 9th

7.            Run 4 Shelter 5K/10K and Half Marathon- September 13th

8.            Jingle Bell 5K/10K- December 13th

 

 

 

 

  
 
BRIDGE RUN 10K

IS CLOSED OUT!

HOWEVER, VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED SO SIGN UP AND YOU CAN STILL HAVE THE THRILL OF THE BRIDGE.

 

 Click here to add your name.

 

 

OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



Spring/Summer Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
 Week #128, 31 MAY 2014
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25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

 
Pain and effort are just two different perspectives on the same sensation" -Matt Fitzgerald 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

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NOTE:

We get a nice 50% discount for the TRUMAN PORT A POT, which means $50 per month. 

 

Another great day for Saturday's run; 64  to 73 degrees, 44% humidity. The HHHH (Hot, Humid, Hazy, Hilly) days are coming.  We will be going to 6:30am START from TPkwy this week to take advantage of the earlier sunrise and avoid some of the mid-morning heat.  The weather forecast looks terrific.  We will be doing the Chesterfield loop again.

 

 I got the following input from John Curley about last week's article on 'fitness loss' -

"Thanks for the info...I really appreciate your running messages, especially this one with a discussion on fitness loss during periods of non-running.  I can use that now. I 

would add to your Changes to your body for the new runners to get plenty of sleep....as I've learned lack of sleep for an extended period of time will cause exercise fatigue, increased blood pressure, and other things I'm sure...."

 

Jim Le Clare finished the Massanutten 100 Mile Run last weekend.  MMT is considered the hardest trail run on the East coast and is the only East coast qualifier for many of the harder western ultras.   It was a llllong 35 hours for Jim. 

OK .. so basically I ran a 50 miler (12 hours) .. and then .. well .. not so much of a run .. but instead a challange to stay ahead of the cut offs. Stomach went south right around 50 mile point .. or more like 45 mile point. Maybe it was the Advil I took or too much water (and food) early on .. or type of food .. but whatever it was .. it got me. Through the next almost 24 hours .. I often thought of our group, and different running scenarios where we would be out on the course long after the first place finishers have packed up, ie  Barb at HS40 getting across the finish at the end and Ron with recent 50K, etc etc (mostly thinking .. because it took too much effort to talk).  Met some good aid station captains .. one at mile 70 that kicked me out of the chair .. not to be confused with the one at mile 63 that kicked me off the cot  .. mile 70 was probably the more interesting being that it was maybe 2 AM or 3 AM and pitch dark (in valley with trees) with long climb back to top on Mountain, that was more of a team effort to get me away from bonfire and moving along. After mile 70 .. I could no longer afford to lose time at aid stations so had to be in and out with reasonable efficiency.  At mile 80 I met up with Gary Kipling .. first 70 year old to finish MMT100 (turned 70 this year) .. he gave me his diluted smoothy that he would sip very small portions of when his stomach would give out. That smoothy did the trick .. took me about 1 hour to drink small oz bottle .. but it stayed down, and it was one of the only two small bottles Gary had between the aid stations, so Gary gave up his hydration to help out.  Mile 85 (or something like that) Aid station .. one of the volunteers (Dave Yeakel) went ahead to road crossing 4 or so miles up the trail to have some sweat tea for me to try .. he said that worked for him .. very small amount .. little at a time. Dan Lahman (HS40 race director) .. gave me his better head lamp .. somewhere in the night .. we ran through a ton of water and very slippery .. so the better headlamp helped greatly to see rocks ahead. 
so -- glad to have key qualifier done -- will stick with our running group and the shorter runs (sub 100s) for a while and maybe one 100 a year is plenty."


Tom Corby, Kathleen Madden, and Barb Hamilton went up to York Pa. for the BOB POTTS MARATHON:
"

 We really enjoyed the Bob Potts marathon yesterday. The weather was perfect and the course was beautiful and relaxing. No hills, no technical trails, and lots of nice scenery. About 75% of the course was under tree shade and all but two miles was on packed gravel which was easy on the feet. The path was wide enough that we could go three abreast most of the way. They had water stops every two miles which were very well staffed and the people were wonderful. Nearly all of the course was alongside railroad tracks so it was a straight out and back. Lots of farms, nice country homes and old style train stations. Even though it's a relatively short drive to York, Pa. (< 90 minutes), we went the night before since the race started at 6AM. We ran an easy 5hrs 34min using this as training for the upcoming 70 miler in England. This was a small race and not at all crowded. It also happens to be a Boston qualifier even though they did not use any timing chips - just a start gun and a clock at the finish. Speaking of the finish, it ended on the York College athletic field where we entered and did a half lap around the track to a cheering crowd as they called out our names. Very cool! Barb, Leenie and I agreed this was about as pleasant a marathon as we'd ever run (although Leenie had a bit of leg cramping). Definitely on the list again for next year. 

Tom"

 

 

   Here is the link to register for the full year's training:  MOORE'S MARINE's

 

 BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM and 10k 9 AUG.

 

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Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

  

ANOTHER FOOT STRIKE STUDY - IS HEEL STRIKE BETTER?

 

Usain Bolt doesn't worry about his running economy. He powers off his forefeet to generate as much speed as possible for just 10 to 20 seconds, then he gets to stop and recover. Oxygen use doesn't concern him.
On the other hand, marathoners strive for a high economy - that is, low oxygen consumption - because their event lasts for three to five hours, or more. Studies have shown that 80 to 90 percent of midpack marathoners land on their heels. Presumably the body naturally chooses heel-landings to ensure good running economy.
 

HEEL STRIKE STUDY 

 

2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING PROGRAM
If you are looking to do any long 
Ben Moore logo
distance run - Marathon, 50k, 50 Mile or even longer - YOU NEED A PLAN  Join others with the same goals - even targeting the same race.
 
MY NUMBER "1" GOAL FOR EACH OF YOU

If I could sum up the the most important lesson I want you to learn, it would be LISTEN TO YOUR BODY. It is like one of your kids who will keep turning up the volume on their pleas until you respond to them. ACT EARLY and you can avoid something that will impact your training.  ASK QUESTIONS. There is a lot of experience in your fellow runners and LOTS of proven self-imposed remedies that can save you a lot of doctor's bills.  A rule of thumb I use is if a injury/soreness is to do something about it right away - ice, self-massage. If it persists more than a couple of runs, alter your running to reduce the stress on the injury; do a bike instead of a run, for example. If it does not show improvement in about a week - get help.  To me that means getting a massage; trigger point therapy and/or deep tissue is great because they can isolate the injury and help identify the root cause.  I think chiropractic adjustment is extremely valueable to runners. No one has perfect body mechanics and symmetry. Running for multiple hours will magnify ANY slight anomaly to the point of discomfort. High arches, low arches, leg length difference, muscle imbalance, are just a few of the things you will never notice in day to day activities but at the end of a 20 mile run - you WILL know.  Also, massage specialists and chiropractors tend to be much more attuned to runners than MD's.  Their first response is not going to be 'don't run' and 'take these pain-killers' and 'come back in two weeks'.  Now there are SOME things that may get to the point needing a specialist in orthopedics, like torn cartiladge in the knee, but you will know a lot more about the injury and what has worked and not worked before you get to that point.


- I got a few questions about Yasso 800's and how they relate to marathon pace. The problem is you are trying to "think" too much :-)  Yasso 800's are not scientifically derived.  Believe me, Bart Yasso, editor-at-large for Runners World, is NOT a scientificaly oriented guy :-) Bart came on Yasso 800's kind of serendipiditiously.  He noticed that his marathon times, (2:50-ish) always closely matched the times he was doing his 800 repeats for his track workouts. He gathered info from runners across the country, real fast and real slow and found there was a correlation. He has had elite runners use the method with good consistency. I've pesonally used it over the last few years and, sometimes it is right on (I mean to the second) and sometimes it is way off.  On the 'way off' times I know there has always been some other factor involved - illness, injury prior to race, race day conditions, etc.  The math comes out that 4 min 800's is an 8 min/mile pace - much faster than the 9 min/mile for a 4 hr-ish marathon. The key is that the 4 min 800's are building up your bodies capacity to hold a faster pace longer - which is why I stress doing them consistently and gradually adding reps. By the time you build up to 10 reps of 4 min 800's, a 9 min/mile pace will be comfortable enough to hold for 26.2 miles.  Remember, you should finish the last 800 feeling like you could do ONE MORE. In other words, these are NOT "too exhaustion" intervals like we did in school for 400 meter races or 1 mile races. You will see that by doing the Yasso's consistently, your long run pace will start being a little quicker and a little more comfortable.

 

 

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ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.