IN THIS ISSUE
WHAT CAN RUNNERS LEARN FROM AN OLD SKELTONION PLAN FAILS.
KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES
BRIDGE RUN 10K SIGN UP
Routes and Photos
tRENDS IN RUNNING-WHO KNEW
HOW OFTEN TO RACE DURING MARATHON TRAINING
WORKOUTS
2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING SCHEDULE

UP COMING EVENTS

   



Sat 9 Aug
BEN MOORE MEMORIAL
HALF MARATHON, 10K
Truman Parkway
DETAILS/REGISTER

Sat 6 Sep
FARMING FOR HUNGER 5K
Prince Frederick, Md

Sat 6 Sep
RUN AWAKE 5k
Quiet Waters

Sat 6 Sep
FARMING FOR HUNGER
Prince Frederick

13 Sep
FEED ANNAPOLIS 5M
Navy Stadium

Sat 20 Sep
RUN FOR LIFE 5K
Crownsville, Md

Sat 27 Sep
Glen Burnie Assoc 5k
Glen Burnie, Md

Sat 27 Sep
Charles County HOSPICE 5k
Waldorf, MD


Sat 27 Sep
RIDGEWAY E.S 5K
Millersville, Md

Sun 28 Sep
ANNAPOLIS RUN 4 SHELTER 
HALF MARATHON, 5K
Quiet Waters, Md

Sun 28 Sep
TRI 4 THE CHESAPEAKE & DUATHLON
Edgewater, Md

Sun 28 Sep
KELLY T SHIVELY 5K
Kent Island

Sat 4 Oct
Arundel VFD 5k
Crofton, MD

Sun 5 Oct
ADJUST FIRST 5K/10K
Kent Island

Sat 25 Oct
GRACE POINTE 5k
Millersville, Md

Sun 26 Oct
ZOMBIE RUN 5k
La Plata, Md

Sun 2 Nov
RIPLEY RACE 5k
Navy Stadium


The KENT ISLAND RUNNING GROUP now has our own website; check it out

DETAILS HERE

KENT ISLAND 
CHALLENGE SERIES
NO CHARGE
dETAILS/REGISTER here
                            

THE OLD GUARD - AND THE NEW GUARD
                                 
RonandBeau

 

Here is an article by Erol Jones from Ultrarunning Magazine.  Erol and I started doing ultras about the same time.  He went totally 'native' and did only trail runs.  I continued to do both but our views and recollections are very similar.

 

By now it's old news to many about that fateful day in August of 1974 when Gordy Ainsleigh's horse wound up lame and he decided to take to the trails on foot against the mounted riders of the Tevis Cup 100 in California's Sierras. He completed the 100-mile trail course with nary any fuel or fancy hydration in 23 hours and 42 minutes, giving rise to the sport that we now know as trail ultrarunning and the Western States 100. At the time Gordy was running the Sierras I was taking to road running and marathoning with a vengeance. Six years later I would embark on my first trail race, never to really return to road running.

There was no real science of trail running back then. The sport was in its infancy, even in the mid-'80s most everything was trial and error. ERG and Gator Ade were just coming into existence as electrolyte replacements for football players, and those in conjunction with Coke, Seven-Up and Ginger ale were the sports drinks. Snickers, Pay Day and Milky Way bars were the energy bars of the time. It was Gordy who gave me my first Snickers bar to stave off bonking during a run at Western States in the '80s. Aunt Jemima syrup bottles and various rubbing alcohol bottles or others with an ergonomic shape were our "hand-helds" for many years.

No one could even spell hydration pack back then and vests were something you wore with a suit or as part of hunting attire. LED flashlights light up the trails at night now like a major freeway, but back then it was the conventional home flashlight that guided us through the dark. Now GPS's determine precise location and how far, high or fast one has run, plus heart rate data and calories consumed (I can't wait for the models that measure fat vs carb burning...) and they're on every other wrist. All we had were sun dials (ok, that's a bit of hyperbole).

But back then you didn't know about GPS unless you worked for NASA, and you only had a cell phone if your name was Cannon, Kojack or Mannix (the older readers know who they were), or if you worked for the police, FBI or CIA.

There were five 100-mile races every year and when the numbers hit 15 or so we thought that was a cornucopia of events. Most runners across the country knew one another by name, as well as their times run at different distances. If you didn't run the event held in your area you paced or crewed someone who was, or you worked the event, that's the way it was. Ultrarunning has become a business of sorts now with some directors putting on multiple events every year. And there are gateway event holders, like the North Face Endurance Challenge who help newbies transition from road to trails, and up to the ultra distances.

Errol and Tropical John at the start of the 1994 Western States.

Now there are over one hundred 100-mile events that one can choose from and if you don't sign up the day that some of these events come online, you can't get into that particular race, not to even mention the proliferation of "lotteries." But now at least there's always an ultra that one can run on any other weekend, that's both the good and the bad of it. In days of yore you sent a self-addressed stamped envelope with your request for entry to the race director and waited for acceptance and your results came the same way - "snail mail" as they now call it.

During the running boom of the '70s and eighties some of us transitioning from marathoning on the roads to trail ultras carried over our flair, such as it was. Three-inch-inseam split shorts, can you dig it? But back then many of the pioneers were still wearing cut off blue jeans, corduroy, field pants or nylon gym shorts from the '60s and '70s, replete with white dress shirts with holes cut into them to facilitate venting and air flow. No micro fiber shorts or shirts, no compression shorts, socks or tops, no running vests, skirts (ok, I'll admit that's a real improvement in the sport) or lycra-like yoga outfits (ditto.)

The sport and the science of ultrarunning were in the developing stages and while most felt the sport would survive, none were certain and we never envisioned it blossoming the way that it has. We were characterized as the lunatic fringe by some in the media and when the sport or its participants received press outside of UltraRunning magazine or the occasional Runner's World article it was about someone or some group who was at the extreme end of the ultrarunning community. The Divine Madness Ultrarunning group, based in Colorado at the time, was thought of by some as a cult group, and Bare Foot Ted McDonald was the only chronicled shoeless ultrarunner in the '80s - his approach was viewed as crazy, not a craze, as has been the case with the Taramahura-inspired barefoot and minimalist shoe fad.

We had some intelligent and favorable accounts of Western States 100 through Wide World of Sports, and a sensible but rare article would crop up in print in the New York Times, but little else. In this new millennium you can find articles on a frequent basis about the sport or it's participants in the local paper (to the extent those still exist...). Ultrarunners are on talk shows and television commercials, there's a plethora of ultrarunning books and medical studies on a wide range of things related to the sport are conducted and debated regularly. Not to mention the ultrarunning websites and blogs.

One of the things I've always relished about the sport of ultrarunning is the accepting nature of those associated with it, and that is something that hasn't changed. One's sexual proclivity, ethnicity, gender, social, political, financial or educational status has never been a barrier, nor a stepping stone towards acceptance in ultrarunning. Ultrarunning tends to strip all of that away and reveal the true essence of a person's character, and for that I love it.

But this old codger does have some questions for the newbies - shoes range from Hoka's to minimalist and everything in between - seemingly contradictory footwear technologies all claiming to be the "only way," what gives? Some runners wear tutus, capes and court jester caps in events, when did those become part of trail running apparel? I thought there were other venues for super-heroes and ballerinas, inquiring old minds want to know. When did GU, Cliff bar and Vespa wrappers become part of the trail flora and fauna, and does anyone except old-schoolers or runners fulfilling volunteer "requirements" work aid stations?

 

Change comes to everything in life and the old have to accept and make way for the new but there's something to be said for the pioneers of the sport and the trails that they blazed and traditions set. One thing remains consistent in trail running and that is the challenge associated with it and the beauty and serenity of many of the locations where events are held. The sharing and interaction with nature still enthralls most and the opportunity to disengage from the monotony and grind of the everyday world are still it's greatest appeal. There's room for everyone in this extreme endeavor and there's no end in sight. Its a sport where the back-of-thepackers get to rub elbows with the Ellie Greenwoods and Sage Canadays. It's a beautiful and special sport, one worth ranting about in this and forthcoming articles. Until then, enjoy the trails and stay tuned.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

 

 

  You are an 'experiment of one' :-)

 
KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

  

DON'T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR

KICS-KENT ISLAND CHALLENGE SERIES

Did you run at the Get Pumped for Pets race March 9th? Are you doing Al's Run on March 29th? These are just TWO of the races included in the Kent Island Challenge Series!

The Kent Island Running Group (KIRG) is proud to introduce the brand new Kent Island Challenge Series (KICS) for 2014. Series consists of 8 local races. Compete with others to be eligible for end of year Age Group awards by completing any 6 of 8 races. Those completing all 8

races will be recognized as a KIRG IRON CRAB.   There is no cost to

participate in the Series but you must pre-register at: www.kirg.org.

(Full details available there as well.) If you join the KIRG, you can save $5 on registration to all of the series races!

 

Races included in the series:

1.            Get Pumped for Pets 5K/10K - March 9th

2.            Al's Run 5 miles - March 29th

3.            Kent Island Full and Half Metric Marathon-        April 13th

4.            Connor'sMiles 5K/10K/10M - May 10th

5.            Rosaryville 10K/10M/25K/50K - July 20th

6.            Ben Moore Memorial 10K and Half Marathon- August 9th

7.            Run 4 Shelter 5K/10K and Half Marathon- September 13th

8.            Jingle Bell 5K/10K- December 13th

 

 

 

 

  
 
PORT  A   POT  Donation
We need your donation.

 If you have not made a donation in a while, please consider doing so. The Port A Pot is maintained by donations from you

NOTE:

I can now accept credit card donations; with secure, receipt verification.

BRIDGE RUN 10K

IS CLOSED OUT!

HOWEVER, VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED SO SIGN UP AND YOU CAN STILL HAVE THE THRILL OF THE BRIDGE.

 

 Click here to add your name.

 

 

ROUTES and PHOTOS

Tom Nelson has constructed a site to show our routes and water stop locations for the long run coming up each week.  You can indicate your intention to run and see who else is planning on showing up - one more incentive for getting there. Check back to the following website later in the week for the latest info on water support:

TRUMAN ROUTES

 

NOTE:  Steve has added a rotating photo feature to the web page. I have sent him some photos but if you have any you like, send them to Steve at: steve.carton@retrievalsystems.com  Take a look.

 
OUR SPONSORS
 
bluepoint cat



Spring/Summer Moore's Marines Long Distance Training
***
Kent Island Running CLUB
***
Peninsula Pacers Running CLUB
 Week #137, 9 AUGUST 2014
============================
25 YEARS OF MOORE'S MARINE'S

 

30 Years of MOORE'S MARINES 

Every run, I stop at some point in my run for a few minutes, look around, and enjoy the surroundings. I'm reminded of why I do this and why I love it so much.
Anita Ortiz 

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Note: If you have an article, link, tip, race accomplishment or milestone to pass on to the group, please let me know. Use Annapolis Trail Runners Facebook Group to share tips and questions directly with everyone in the group.

 

 ********************************************  

LATE NOTE:  Willie Gumula was in an accident on his motorcycle yesterday. Head on collision with a car on Rt424. The car crossed the mid-line hit Willie and kept going.  He has a broken foot and injured finger but is okay and recovering at home.  He intends to be cheering BEN MOORE runners from his porch so be sure to wave to him as you go by on Pinedale.  Get well soon, Willie.  We are thinking of you.

 

 

NOTE:

We get a nice 50% discount for the TRUMAN PORT A POT, which means $50 per month. 
  

NOTE: VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR BEN MOORE MEMORIAL RUN -Complimentary Entry for a friend this year or apply it to next year 

 

Better conditions for last Saturday's run.  The forecast 80% chance of rain did not happen - dry all the way.   YOU ALWAYS SHOW UP :-).  It was an excellent opportunity to work on your marathon pace (for the last few miles).  This is the point in the training that Sandy Kirkland  had been having trouble 'fading' during toward the end of her long runs.  She doubled her Endurolytes and had a great run.   All of you should be working  to find that 'magic mix' that works best for you.  I know John and others are working on increasing their fluid intake, and associated salt/electrolyte intake to stave off cramps.

 

You should be well into your experimentation with different energy gels and endurance fluids; or fine tuning what you already know works for you.  It boils down to finding what combination of electrolytes, protein, carbohydrates, sugar, amino acids, sugars, and flavoring works best for your system - and tastes good enough that you will actually consume it 

 

When you have a 'breakthrough', share it with the rest of us!  Everyone will benefit.

 

   It is not an easy process - a lot of trial and error - but when you hit that 'magic mix', the birds will sing louder, the breeze will get cooler, and your feet will float over the ground.......Well, it will be a great feeling, anyway :-)   But it does not end there.  As you get stronger, run longer, run faster; you will need to continually fine tune your 'magic mix', but the increment changes will be smaller.  This is happening for Jane Meyer who has been having 'best ever' performances lately; running more and quicker miles than ever.

 

Every run is different.   Every runner is different.

 
    Here is the link to register for the full year's training:  MOORE'S MARINE's

 

 BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HM and 10k 9 AUG.

 

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Tom Nelson has diligently collected GPS maps of the many routes we use from Truman.  Here is a link to his excellent Runningahead routes:  Click here for:  

MOORE's MARINES RUN ROUTES

 

EVERY RUNNER IS AN EXPERIMENT OF ONE - EVERY RUN IS A NEW ADVENTURE

 

  

RUNNING BEN MOORE MEMORIAL HALF MARATHON

 I chose this timeframe and distance for the race to pay tribute to LCOL Ben Moore with some care.  It fits in a good place for those training for a fall marathon - MCM - to evaluate their progress.  Think if it as a mid-season tempo run test - with a Finishers medal.

  If you are doing Ben Moore instead of the scheduled 18 mile run don't think you will be behind in your training.  There are two approaches to running Ben Moore HM.

Run Ben Moore hard, thinking about hydration and nutrition and you will find doing the 18 mile run the following week to be more satisfying and productive; and maybe quicker.

  The other option is to run the first 10 miles at marathon pace, then pick up the pace and run the last 3 miles hard, as close to 5k  pace you can.

 

   If you do the 18 mile run, do it at a comfortable pace; that is relaxed.  The first of the each progressively longer run is getting used to more time on your feet.  The Ben Moore run is to get you more comfortable running longer distances at a quicker pace.

  You are at a critical point in your training.  Think about how each run fits in making you stronger, and smarter for meeting your goal.


 

HOW OFTEN TO RACE DURING MARATHON TRAINING

Racing-whether to race at all and how often-during a marathon preparatory period is a controversial topic among the coaching community. Roughly one-third of coaches are proponents of executing a marathon build-up similar to that of a 5K, with six to eight primary races leading up to the goal event. Another half believe that racing should be kept to an absolute minimum while preparing for this unique distance. The remaining handful of coaches implement a theory of based on two key factors:

1. How fit are you at the beginning of your marathon preparation?

2. How much racing did you do prior to your marathon build-up?

 

Whether you are on the "crash-course" 8- to 10-week marathon build-up or a more extended traditional 14- to 16-week plan, marathoners generally fall into two categories of fitness: those who are fit at the start of marathon training, and those who aren't. The fit folks have usually just finished a racing season, and, a month into their marathon preparation, become as fit or fitter than they were during their previous cycle.

 

Fit-at-the-start-of-training runners should race less frequently during the marathon build-up-1 to 2 times max-because over-racing during the ramp-up can put these athletes at a higher risk for being stale on race day. It seems like a paradox, but racing too frequently can make you overly fatigued and therefore not well prepared for marathon day. 

Conversely, should you fall into the category of the athlete who missed the previous season, or who competed infrequently during the previous year, you can race aggressively and frequently racing during the marathon build-up.

 

When runners have multiple seasons or years during which they do little racing, the skills associated with competition can dull. Racing hones a variety of skills and prepares the body for the physical and mental rigors of the toughest of events. Keep racing frequency to fewer than four races in the 11- to 12-week period leading up to your goal marathon, even for those who prefer more rather than fewer competitions.

 

There's a happy meeting point between those who prefer racing more often in their marathon build-up and those who prefer to go hermit and avoid the trap of "week-in, week-out racing." That happy medium is the practice race. These two versions will allow you to establish a competitive environment during your marathon program without undermining your training.

 

1. The Practice Half

Roughly 5 to 6 weeks before your target marathon, run a half marathon. Before the half, jog 3 to 4 miles easy to warm up. When the race starts, run the first 10 miles at goal marathon pace. No matter how good you feel, it's critical to maintain your target marathon rhythm for those opening 10 miles. One you arrive at the 10-mile mark, if you're feeling good, run the final 5K as a harder effort.

 

If you're struggling to maintain marathon tempo-this is fairly common during the bulk of marathon prep-simply stick with your target marathon rhythm. It's worth noting that many athletes have run personal bests in the half marathon while taking this approach during marathon preparation.

 

2. The Finish-With-a-Shorter-Economy Race

Another "trick of the trade" is to complete a shorter race, such as an 8K or 10K, at the tail end of one of your marathon long runs. Simply time your long run so that you have 3 to 6 miles remaining when you arrive at the start line of the shorter race. This is an excellent way to simulate a faster finish to the marathon as well-a skill that many struggle with.

 

How often a marathoner should race-if at all-during the build-up for the big day depends on a variety of factors, including recent racing history and the runner's mental state. Plan your marathon prep wisely, making sure to allow your body plenty of rest and recovery time between harder efforts. This includes racing. Train aggressively and intelligently to prepare well for race day. 

 

 

This Weeks WORKOUTS 

 

 Tuesdays/Wednesday AHS Track Session

The track is being resurfaced at AHS so you can use Pinedale Drive - exactly 1 mile in length and marked every 1/4 mile with light traffic.

 

-   START 6:00pm   
 

  
 Repeat of last weeks Track Workout. Up to 1 Mile Warm Up, then 3 x 1200 (3 laps) recover then do 4 x 100's, all at 80%, do not go harder, even if you feel you can.  The idea is for that level of intensity to become easier to handle.  You will go harder- trust me :-) then 1 Mile Cool Down.
 Steady - Steady - Steady - Relax

 

 Give me some feedback on how it goes.

 Remember, it is about gradual progression that will make you faster WITHOUT getting injured.  If you walk off the track or step off the treadmill feeling like you could have done more - you did just the right amount.  Patience is the hardest lesson runners learn.

  

During the Warm up do some Knee lifts on one curve and Butt-kicks on the other curve, and jog the straight-aways. THIS is IMPORTANT. 

   

Saturday Run 

***START AT 6:30am 


 

If you are NOT doing Ben Moore Memorial Half Marathon, the schedule calls for a 18 mile run  Run steady, on the easy side.  This is for 'time on feet' and to practice your hydration and nutrition plans. 

Concentrate on staying relaxed, your hydration, nutrition, salt intake.  Let me know how it goes.

 

 Keep thinking - "easy, relaxed, smooth stride and breathing". THINK RUN TALL.  Keep  taking "mental notes" on where you need nutrition, salt tabs, etc.  


 

  

   Sunday Trail Run- 8:00am - 5 Mile loop; starting from the AHS football parking lot. This has been less formal do it is best to check.    - Join our Facebook Group "Annapolis Trail Runners" and get details and share tips and questions directly with other members of the Group. 


 

Hope to see you at the track.     


 


 

2014 MOORE'S MARINES TRAINING PROGRAM
If you are looking to do any long 
Ben Moore logo
distance run - Marathon, 50k, 50 Mile or even longer - YOU NEED A PLAN  Join others with the same goals - even targeting the same race.
 

 

 Stay Healthy;   

Ron

  BLUEPOINTTIMING.com 

   c: 410-570-0003